Eggs Are Good for You

A good proportion of most GPs’ consultations will involve some sort of conversation and advice about cholesterol.

It’s certainly one of the tests that patients ask for most. And yet many doctors and health professionals are still giving out incorrect advice when it comes to diet and cholesterol-lowering measures, and the public’s knowledge on the subject is poor at best.

This is concerning considering that research done many years ago quite definitively demonstrated that dietary cholesterol, from foods such as eggs and shellfish, has only a small and clinically insignificant effect on blood cholesterol. For most people, it’s the amount of saturated fat they eat that has a far greater impact on their cholesterol levels than eating foods that contain cholesterol, such as eggs and shellfish. Yet the advice so often still given is to cut down on cholesterol-containing foods, and as a result many people still believe that there are restrictions on the number of eggs  Continue reading

New York Making Healthier Playgrounds

There’s good news for school children in New York. The Child Safe Playing Fields Act, which took effect May 17, prohibits use of pesticides on playgrounds, athletic fields and all grassy areas in K-12 schools across the state.

This law represents major progress toward preventing children’s exposure to pesticides and the resulting health harms. Science clearly shows that during critical developmental windows, exposure to pesticides can cause long-term and irreversible damage for children’s health and cognitive development.

Schools in New York will transition to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices that do not use synthetic pesticides and rely on commonsense approaches to managing pests. Continue reading

Benefits of Bioidentical Progesterone

Question: What are the benefits of taking a progesterone supplement?

Dr. Brownstein’s Answer:

Progesterone is produced in the adrenal glands of men and women, as well as in women’s ovaries. During menstruation, it is the hormone that prepares the uterus for implantation of a fertilized egg. Progesterone also acts as a natural antidepressant and diuretic, helps to activate thyroid hormone, improves libido, protects against breast disease, and can even  Continue reading

Treatments for Dark under Eye Circles

One of the most frequently read and viewed articles from the Journal of Dermatologic Surgery, discusses the causes and treatments of dark under-eye circles.

Basically, they divided the reasons for these into three categories: pigment in the skin, blood vessels, and hollow troughs under the eyes.

Some of these are easily corrected while others are more difficult. Treatments range from topical medications and topical cosmeceutical products (such as Scientificskin.com eye cream) to lasers and soft tissue augmentation product such as Restylane and Juvederm.

Pigment in the epidermis is usually formed after minor irritation, hormones, or after procedures.  Continue reading

Treat Cancer with the Natural Cancer Fighters

Question: My daughter has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Because of her HER2 test result, she is being told that she needs a mastectomy then chemotherapy and a drug called Herceptin. Does she really need such long and harsh treatment?

Dr. Blaylock’s Answer:

The HER2/neu is an oncogene; that is, a tumor gene that makes breast cancers more aggressive and gives patients a poorer prognosis overall. This gene causes the tumor to secrete a growth factor and an enzyme called metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9).

These factors make breast cancers grow faster and become more likely to spread (metastasize),  Continue reading

Scientists Admit Sunlight Can Prevent Cancer

Since the 1980s, physicians and cancer groups have regularly warned the public against the potential health dangers of direct sunlight on skin. As a result, many people have stayed out of the sunlight completely, covered their limbs even in warm weather or slathered themselves with UV protection products, all in the interest of lowering their risk of melanomas.

However, more recent findings indicate that this kind of nearly vampiric avoidance of the sun may not benefit your cancer odds after all.

A 2009 study by a group of Leeds University researchers found that higher levels of Vitamin D were linked to improved skin cancer survival odds. Other studies have found  Continue reading

Invisible Health Threats that Surround Us

Almost all of us use electrical appliances and cell phones on a daily basis. Few people take a moment to stop and think about the side-effects of the electromagnetic fields that these appliances have on our health. Even fluorescent lights produce electromagnetic fields.

Electric blankets have been linked to childhood leukemia and miscarriages because of the fact that electromagnetic fields created by them are able to penetrate up to 7 inches into the body. People who are exposed to fluorescent light at home or in the workplace can experience feelings of reduced alertness which in turn can lead to feeling more tired than usual. This is because the electromagnetic fields which are emitted from these lights cause red blood cells to clump together. Continue reading

Molecule in Grapefruits Helps to Treat Arteriosclerosis, Hyper-Metabolism, and Even Diabetes

Israeli scientists may have discovered an effective new way to treat high cholesterol and diabetes naturally. Dr. Yaakov Nahmias from the Benin School of Engineering and Computer Science at Hebrew University and his colleagues have discovered that naringenin, a molecule in grapefruits that gives the fruit its bitter taste, can help to treat arteriosclerosis, hyper-metabolism, and even diabetes.

The study, which was recently published in the journal PLoS One, explains that when a highly-bioavailable “nano-complex” of naringenin is consumed just before a meal that is high in fat and sugar, it can reduce the development of bad cholesterol by roughly 42 percent, and actually increase insulin sensitivity by 64 percent.

Dr. Nahmias and his colleagues allege that naringenin in its natural form is not very easily absorbed by the body. So they developed what they say is an improved version on the substance, which is surrounded by a ring of sugar, called cyclodextrin, and that is 11 times more bioavailable than naringenin that comes straight from a grapefruit. Continue reading

Rare Type of Tree Bark to Relieve Serious Pain According to Study

A new study published in the journal Nature Chemistry provides new insight into the power of a rare type of tree bark to relieve serious pain. Scientists from the Scripps Research Institute (SRI) in Florida discovered that the bark of the Tabernaemontana divaricata plant, also known as crepe jasmine, contains a compound known as conolidine that appears to be just as effective at treating pain as morphine, but without all the harmful side effects.

Glenn Micalizio, an associate professor at the SRI Department of Chemistry, and his colleagues first had to figure out a way to synthesize conolidine in order to study it. Once they did, they discovered for the first time that conolidine is an effective alternative to traditional opioid analgesics. And because it does not cause nausea, constipation, breathing problems, and even death like morphine can, conolidine has great potential to become a natural replacement for this and other pain medications.

Not an opioid itself, conolidine remains a bit of a mystery. Researchers are not quite sure how the substance works to relieve both acute and inflammatory pain in a similar way as opioids do without acting upon the same cellular receptors.  Continue reading

Safest Sunscreen to Use is Nano Zinc Oxide

The debate about sunscreens rages on. Dermatologists advise slathering up every day. Nutritionists and holistic doctors advise sun exposure to get vitamin D. Some even say sunscreens cause cancer, and a disturbing study showed that people who used more commercial sunscreen had more melanoma.

Where is the truth? We might never know. Sunscreen manufacturers need to sell their product and natural sunscreen companies have little money for research. The FDA is mute and has never said that sunscreens prevent skin cancer. It is clear that commercial sunscreen ingredients (like oxybenzone and methoxycinnamate) are potent hormone disruptors and potential carcinogens. My advice is to never use these commercial sunscreens.

What should you do? Be judicious and safe. Get sun exposure. It is the best and most reliable source of vitamin D. But avoid sunburn, which damages the skin and may increase your risk of skin cancer. Avoid baking in the sun at midday, especially those first days of summer or your beach vacation. Gradually build your tan. Wear a hat to protect your face from sunburn.

If your kids are at camp or swimming  Continue reading

Energetic Medicine

If your feel fatigued, vaguely ill or worse, maybe your body voltage is low. A valid correlation between pH levels and voltages has been established. And a device to measure that voltage and recharge voltage levels has been created.

A Short History of Energetic Medicine

The most obvious is acupuncture. Needles inserted strategically at specific points along the body’s meridians to stimulate and restore what Chinese medicine calls chi energy. The meridians are charted flow lines of chi, which is the body’s electrical energy.

Another ancient medical practice,  Continue reading

Epazote

Parts used: leaf, whole plants, seeds

PROPERTIES AND ACTIONS
Main actions:

* Expels worms
* Kills parasites
* Kills the amoebas
* slightly laxative
* Kills bacteria
* Prevents ulcers
* Insect repellent

Other actions:
* Increases the transpiration Continue reading

The Benefits and Side Effects of Hibiscus Tea

People drink tea for a number of reasons, ranging from an affinity for the taste to an extra caffeine boost to a variety of health benefits. Tea is a popular drink across the world, and whether you’re drinking chai in India or Earl Gray in Britain, each tea has a unique flavor and essence. Jamaica flower tea is a hibiscus tea known for its popularity in Mexico.

Jamaica Flower Tea

Jamaica flower tea is an iced tea made from a flower called Jamaica (hibiscus sabdariffa). In Mexico, hibiscus blossoms are called Jamaica and Jamaica flower tea is called “Agua de Jamaica.” Made from a strong brew of hibiscus flower tea, Jamaica flower tea is a tart, flavorful red tea, often sweetened heavily with sugar.

Diuretic, Laxative or Digestive Supplement Continue reading

Fever is not Your Child’s Enemy but His Friend

It can be scary when your child’s forehead feels abnormally warm to the touch. So it’s only natural for parents to stress over how to treat a fever in their child. But your impulse to bring that fever down immediately with ibuprofen or acetaminophen may not be the best move, according to a new American Academy of Pediatrics clinical report, published in the journal Pediatrics. The reason: Your child’s fever is a physiologic mechanism that has beneficial effects in fighting infection, so reducing the fever may actually hamper healing.

The details: Even when a child has a mild fever, many parents want to administer antipyretics such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen, according to the report. That’s natural; we all want to be reassured by that “normal” 98.6 reading on the thermometer. But according to the AAP researchers, there is no evidence that fever itself worsens the course of an illness, or causes any long-term neurologic complications. “Thus, the primary goal…should be to improve the child’s overall comfort rather than focus on the normalization of body temperature,” the report says. Continue reading

Sleep Robbers

A midday doze doesn’t make you old. It makes you smart. A 2010 City University of New York study found that people who nap have sharper memories. But not just any nap will do: Use our guide to find your sweet spot.

10 Minutes

A quick fix: Napping for 10 minutes immediately wards off fatigue and boosts brainpower for at least 2 ½ hours, an Australian study found. A 5-minute nap? No help.

What your sleeping position says about your personality.

20 Minutes

Delayed benefits: Doubling down will improve your reaction time and performance on alphanumeric tasks. But not right away—it takes at least 35 minutes to shake off the postnap mental fog from “taking 20.” Continue reading