Memories Can now be Modified with New Mind-Altering Drug

Changing bad memories into good ones could be just a pill away, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Researchers from the University of Montreal in Canada say that metyrapone, a drug that blocks the “stress hormone” cortisol, also appears to alter patients’ memories and minimizing their recollection of negative events — but is this actually a good thing?

For their study, Marie-France Marin and her team evaluated the effects of metyrapone on a group of young men shown a slide show that documented the serious injury of a young girl. In it, the girl is building a birdhouse with her grandparents until a serious accident lands her in the emergency room.  Continue reading

Psych Drug Doctors pushing to implement Lithium in Drinking Water

Chlorine, fluoride, and the various other chemical poisons already added to the nation’s drinking water supplies are apparently not enough for the self-appointed experts whose insatiable lust to force-medicate the world is never satisfied. A recent report in The Daily offers credence to the insane notion that adding lithium, a drug currently used to treat mental disorders, to drinking water will be beneficial in helping to reduce suicide and violent crime rates.

Much like fluoride, lithium alters the brain’s normal production of serotonin and norepinephrine, which in turn artificially alters the way an individual, thinks and how he or she feels about a given situation. Lithium is literally a mind-altering, antidepressant chemical substance that those promoting it openly admit modifies brain function. And yet they purport that forcibly inducing these chemical changes on the unwitting populations of the world is a good and acceptable idea. Continue reading

Most Expensive Coffee Beans are harvested from Droppings of the Civet

Here’s something you probably didn’t know about coffee: The world’s most expensive coffee, kopi luwak (literally, “civet coffee”) is brewed from coffee beans that have been eaten and partially digested by the Asian palm civet, a catlike wild animal. The beans are harvested from the droppings of the civet and washed, and can be brewed into an aromatic coffee renowned for its low bitterness and excellent flavor.

According to coffee critic Chris Rubin, “The aroma is rich and strong, and the coffee is incredibly full bodied, almost syrupy. It’s thick with a hint of chocolate, and lingers on the tongue with a long, clean aftertaste.”

A pound of kopi luwak can cost anywhere from $100 to $3,000, and a single cup may cost as much as $80. Traditionally, the coffee was so rare because harvesters had to scour  Continue reading

Geomancy

Geomancy : is an ancient form of divination which involves either, the scattering of handfuls of soil, earth or other materials on the ground, or markings made in the earth or sand, in order to make ‘a range of dot configurations which can then be “read” by a seer’.

Geomancy, however in the 19th century began to be applied to the Chinese practice of feng shui, which literally means “wind and water”.  This is an ancient Chinese system of creating harmonious surroundings in order to ensure health, happiness and prosperity. The way in which this was done involved the geomantic or the feng shui master employing ‘a circular magnetic compass, called a luopan, which was marked off in rings containing data relating to astrology, directions, the elements, landscape forms, times of day, and so on. The aim was to locate a site where the energies or chi of the land and sky were brought  Continue reading

Vision not needed for Brain to Read

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem: The portion of the brain responsible for visual reading doesn’t require vision at all, according to a new study by researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and France.

Brain imaging studies of blind people as they read words in Braille show activity in precisely the same part of the brain that lights up when sighted readers read. The findings challenge the textbook notion that the brain is divided up into regions that are specialized for processing information coming in via one sense or another, the researchers say.

“The brain is not a sensory machine, although it often looks like one; it is a task machine,” said Dr. Amir Amedi of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, head of the team of researchers whose work on the topic is reported in the latest issue of Current Biology. Continue reading