Telemedicine Reporter – International Edition

Vanderbilt University’s Professor Thomas Abramo joins USTM Medical Advisory Board

Professor Thomas Abramo, M.D., Chief of the Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Director of the Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital Emergency Department, and Professor of Emergency Medicine  Continue reading

The Importance of Keeping a Clean Colon

It is unfortunate that American doctors have contended for decades that the number of bowel movements an individual has is unrelated to health. They have convinced most of us that they are correct. Most people think that they are not constipated if they are having one bowel movement a day. Yet, we eat three meals a day. Where are the other two meals going if they’re not being eliminated through the colon? The answer actually is somewhat frightening. The rest of the food that is not absorbed by the body as nutrients stays around the body in unlikely places — against the colon walls, in tissues and organs, in arteries — any place at all in the body can serve as a receptacle for uneliminated waste.

In ancient days, there were natural methods of maintaining a clean colon. For instance, Basti is the yogic tradition of natural cleansing of the lower intestines. It involves the controlled use of muscles to pull water up into the colon, and then, after churning the water around to dislodge old waste products, the water, and whatever it carries off with it, is expelled.

Dr. John Harvey Kellogg,  Continue reading

Dissecting Dyslexia: Linking Reading to Voice Recognition

New research: Dyslexic individuals have significant difficulty recognizing voices.

When people recognize voices, part of what helps make voice recognition accurate is noticing how people pronounce words differently. But individuals with dyslexia don’t experience this familiar language advantage, say researchers.

The likely reason: “phonological impairment.”

Tyler Perrachione with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology explains, “Even though all people who speak a language use the same words, they say those words just a little bit differently from one another–what is called ‘phonetics’ in linguistics.” Continue reading

New Findings on Therapeutic Hypothermia Following Cardiac Arrest in Children

Intravenous delivery of cold fluids to reduce body temperature quickly after a heart attack and improve neurologic outcomes may not be as effective in children as it is in adults, according to a study reported in Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. The article is available free online at www.liebertpub.com/ther

In adults, therapeutic hypothermia to minimize neurological complications caused by cardiac arrest can be achieved by rapidly infusing cold (4oC) intravenous fluid. However, this might not be the optimal approach in children. Alexis Topjian, Michael Hamid, Larissa Hutchins, and Vinay Nadkarni, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, studied the effect of the infusion rate on the temperature of the cold IV fluid in three simulated pediatric patients of different weights. They describe the study design and their results in the article entitled, “Can a Cold (4oC) IV Fluid Bolus to Induce Therapeutic Hypothermia Really Deliver 4oC to Children?”

“This is an important and timely contribution because it reinforces the point that children are not just small people Continue reading

The Only Treatment for Celiac is a Lifelong Gluten Free Diet

One or the most remarkable facts about celiac — the autoimmune reaction to the gluten in wheat, barley and rye — is the stunningly wide range of problems it can cause. The list of difficulties linked to celiac includes not only digestive discomfort but things like nerve damage, dementia, thyroid disorders, and diabetes and nutrient deficiencies. Celiac is a many-headed health monster.

Traditionally, the medical community has considered celiac to be a digestive disease. Symptoms like bloating, diarrhea, stomach pain and intestinal gas were believed to be the main signs that your body was experiencing physiological complications related to gluten. However, more recently, researchers have begun to recognize that gluten’s harmful effects are not always restricted to digestion. It is that fact that can make celiac such an insidious disease.

For example, if you began to unexpectedly suffer nerve damage and/or brain fog , chances are you wouldn’t initially suspect that the bread you eat every day might be the cause of your condition.  Continue reading

Telemedicine to Extend To All Parts of Globe if Doctors, Technologists Work Together

Telemedicine has been around in the U.S. for quite some time, but experts at the IEEE (News – Alert) have just announced that its “technologically ready to meet the growing demand” in developing nations and remote areas around the world, according to a press release posted at finance.yahoo.com.

But there’s a caveat. Widespread use of telemedicine will only happen if technologists and clinicians work together to ensure it can be used everywhere in the world, the story says. Towards this end, the IEEE will hold two conferences in Boston later this year.

According to BCC (News – Alert) Research as reported in the press release, the global telemedicine market is expected to grow “from $9.8 billion in 2010 to $23 billion in 2015,  Continue reading

Mental Disorders in Children are the Result of Vitamin D Deficiencies

A new study shows that children with psychosis and other severe mental health disorders also have twice as much vitamin D deficiency as children who are mentally healthy.

The study, presented to the American Psychiatric Association 2011 Annual Meeting in Honolulu in June by researchers from the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland showed that 21 percent of children with symptoms of severe psychiatric problems had vitamin D levels below what the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends.

That level compared with 14 percent of children who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, a population-based study Continue reading

Gladstone Scientist Converts Human Skin Cells into Functional Brain Cells

Breakthrough discovery is likely to advance medicine and human health

A scientist at the Gladstone Institutes has discovered a novel way to convert human skin cells into brain cells, advancing medicine and human health by offering new hope for regenerative medicine and personalized drug discovery and development.

In a paper being published online today in the scientific journal Cell Stem Cell, Sheng Ding, PhD, reveals efficient and robust methods for transforming adult skin cells into neurons that are capable of transmitting brain signals, marking one of the first documented experiments for transforming an adult human’s skin cells into functioning brain cells.

“This work could have important ramifications  Continue reading

Antioxidants of Interest to Address Infertility, Erectile Dysfunction

A growing body of evidence suggests that antioxidants may have significant value in addressing infertility issues in both women and men, including erectile dysfunction, and researchers say that large, specific clinical studies are merited to determine how much they could help.

A new analysis, published online in the journal Pharmacological Research, noted that previous studies on the potential for antioxidants to help address this serious and growing problem have been inconclusive, but that other data indicates nutritional therapies may have significant potential.

The researchers also observed that infertility problems are often an early indicator of other degenerative disease issues such as atherosclerosis, high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. The same approaches that may help treat infertility  Continue reading

The Benefits of Sea Salts

Believe it or not, salt is good for your health! But why do we often hear our doctors advise us to stay away from salt or salt-treated foods? Yet we need salt to balance our diet. So are all salts the same? What really makes sea salt different from a regular salt? Let us take a closer look on the big difference between regular table salt and sea salt.

Our old table salt is highly refined, going through a process that removes the magnesium and trace minerals. Various additives are added, like aluminum compound to keep it dry. The natural iodine is destroyed during its refining process and only added back in the form of potassium iodide. As for sea salt, it is naturally dried under the heat of the sun. Therefore retains its natural iodine from the sea. It also means there is still large mineral content. With sea salt you don’t need to use too much of it since it has much stronger flavor than table salt.

According to Ayurveda doctors, sea salts are the most beneficial forms of salt because they don’t increase the sodium content of blood,  Continue reading

AAP Issues Consent for Pediatric Emergency Services

New recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) provide guidance when parental consent is not readily available or unnecessary, or when parental refusal of consent could harm the child. The Policy Statement, entitled “Consent for Emergency Medical Services for Children and Adolescents,” was reported online July 25 and will appear in the August issue of Pediatrics.

“Parental consent  Continue reading

Pasteurized Milk Found to Contain Painkillers, Antibiotics and Growth Hormones

A single glass of pasteurized milk can contain a toxic chemical cocktail of 20 painkillers, antibiotics, and growth hormones, new research has shown. Using a highly sensitive test, scientists found drug-related chemicals used to treat human illness not only in cow milk, but in goat and human breast milk as well. Among the chemicals were those found in painkillers and other anti-inflammatory drugs. Researchers theorize that some of the drugs and hormones observed are a result of growth hormones administered to cattle, as well as food contamination on the farm.

The Spanish-Moroccan team analysed 20 samples of cow’s milk bought in Spain and Morocco, with the team’s breakdown published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. In addition to containing drug-related chemicals such as niflumic acid, mefenamic acid and ketoprofen, the milk studied was found to contain the hormone 17-beta-estradiol. A form of the sex hormone oestrogen, Continue reading

Grape and Grape Extract Compounds Protect Against Alzheimer Progression

Researchers publishing the result of a study in the Journal of Alzheimer`s Disease found that eating grapes and supplementing with grape seed extract compounds help to prevent the development and progression of Alzheimer`s dementia. This devastating form of dementia is characterized by the accumulation of beta-protein clusters in the brain known as oligomers. A wealth of prior research studies concludes that excess oligomers poison neurons in the brain and cause memory loss associated with the disease. A number of different natural compounds, including grapes and grape extracts, provide a powerful protective shield against the progressive memory loss experienced with Alzheimer`s dementia.

Researchers wanted to follow up on prior studies showing that grape seed polyphenolic extract (GSPE) stops alpha-beta oligomers from being formed in test tube experiments. Using mice that have been bred to genetically develop Alzheimer`s disease, scientists set to determine the effect of grape polyphenols on cognitive decline. For a period of five months they added GSPE to a standard diet and tested the mice for signs of memory deterioration normally found in this line of transgenic animals.

After the five month period, researchers found that the mice had dramatically lowered levels of alpha beta-56, Continue reading

Could Patients Own Kidney Cells Cure Kidney Disease?

Reprogrammed kidney cells could make transplants and dialysis things of the past

  • Patients’ own kidney cells can be reprogrammed and used as therapy against kidney disease
  • Cells can easily be collected from the urine
  • 88,000 patients are waiting for a kidney transplant in the United States, and they wait for an average of 3 to 5 years

Washington, DC — Approximately 60 million people across the globe have chronic kidney disease, Continue reading

Yoga Boosts Stress-busting Hormone, Reduces Pain: York U Study

TORONTO-A new study by York University researchers finds that practicing yoga reduces the physical and psychological symptoms of chronic pain in women with fibromyalgia.

The study is the first to look at the effects of yoga on cortisol levels in women with fibromyalgia. The condition, which predominantly affects women, is characterized by chronic pain and fatigue; common symptoms include muscle stiffness, sleep disturbances, gastrointestinal discomfort, anxiety and depression.

Previous research has found that women with fibromyalgia have lower-than-average cortisol levels, which contribute to pain, fatigue and stress sensitivity.  Continue reading