Freshwater Breakthrough as Huge Aquifers Discovered Beneath Ocean Floor

aquifersHidden beneath the depths of the world’s oceans are large pockets of mostly fresh water that could serve as replacement water sources for the many land-based aquifers that are on the verge of drying up, a new study suggests. Discovered off the coasts of Australia, China, North America and South Africa, these massive underwater aquifers contain Continue reading

Natural Breakthrough May Put Brakes on Childhood Allergies

Studies have shown that there’s no more distressing sound to humans than a baby crying — and I believe it. As a parent, there’s nothing worse than watching our children suffer, particularly when they’re young and unable to communicate what’s ailing them.

But if an exciting new study out of Australia is correct, Continue reading

Huge Victory against Fluoride in Australia

Nearly 200,000 Australians have been released from the medical slavery that is artificial water fluoridation thanks to a major governmental policy change. The Liberal National Party (LNP) government of the Australian state of Queensland has not only cut $14 million of funding that had previously been used for fluoridation, but has also decided to allow local councils to decide for themselves whether or not to fluoridate, a move that has already prompted the northern city of Cairns to end its water fluoridation program. Continue reading

Vaccine Myths Unraveling: 600 Percent Increase in Number of Parents Refusing Vaccinations for their Children (Australia)

Parents across Australia are waking up in droves to the dangers of vaccines, as evidenced by new government figures showing a major uptick in the number of parents who are choosing not to vaccinate their children. According to the data, there has been a 600 percent increase in recent years in the number of informed vaccine opponents who Continue reading

Mobile Health around the Globe: What’s Happening in mHealth in Australia

Australia is currently moving towards a government initiated eHealth care system with secure electronic health records that can be accessed through mobile phones. A conference was held last November that laid the groundwork for this system. The government introduced an iPhone application that enables doctors to access a patient’s record through mobile phones no matter where the patient is located, Continue reading

L-Carnosine Magic Anti-Aging Bullet

Did You Know…

…  that an inexpensive nutritional supplement called L-Carnosine is being hailed as by integrative doctors—including Dr. Oz—as the possible “end of old age?”

The nutrient L-Carnosine may come closer to an anti-aging magic bullet than anything else yet discovered.  Continue reading

US Spends far more for Health Care than 12 Industrialized Nations, but Quality Varies

US spending linked to higher prices and greater use of medical technology, not more doctor visits or hospital stays

The United States spends more on health care Continue reading

Lower Levels of Sunlight Link to Allergy and Eczema

Sunshine may help to prevent allergies and eczema

Increased exposure to sunlight may reduce the risk of both food allergies and eczema in children, according to a new scientific study published this week.

Researchers from the European Centre for Environment & Human Health, along with several Australian institutions, have found that children living in areas with lower levels of sunlight are at greater risk of developing food allergies and the skin condition eczema, compared to those in areas with higher UV.

The research team used data from a study of Australian children and analysed how rates of food allergy, Continue reading

Bacopa May Help Prevent Alzheimer’s and Dementia

An extract of a little-known herb called Bacopa can dramatically increase your brain function and memory — and may even help prevent dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Its therapeutic use has its origins from traditional Ayurvedic medicine in India, where it has been used for its adaptogenic, tranquilizing and antioxidant properties.

Bacopa is a creeping perennial herb that can be found in Nepal, China, India, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Vietnam and some parts of the United States, including Hawaii, Florida and other Southern states. Bacopa (also called Bacopa monnieri or brahmi) thrives in wetlands, on muddy shores and around ponds or bog gardens.

Used in India for thousands of years for both traditional and medicinal purposes, Bacopa had a central role in religious consecration ceremonies for infants: The botanical was believed to open a gateway to intelligence for children.

Shamanic Memory

Researchers may first have been intrigued by Bacopa monnieri because of the effect they believed it had on ancient shamans, who reportedly used the herb to help them memorize epic poems.

Researchers theorized that perhaps Continue reading

Medicine Gets a Feel for the Orient

Acupuncture is being trialed in emergency rooms in Victorian hospitals.

AFTER more than 2500 years, traditional Chinese medicines and therapies are finding a place in the once-sceptical world of Western emergency departments and medical laboratories.

The Chinese Medicine department at RMIT’s School of Health Sciences, the largest provider of Chinese medicine studies in Australia, is collaborating with a range of Victorian hospitals to trial the use and benefits of ancient remedies such as acupuncture and ginseng.

Acupuncture has been trialled on patients suffering acute pain in emergency rooms at the Alfred, Northern, Epworth and Cabrini Hospitals, while ginseng – a root believed to increase stamina and quality of life since the 11th century – is being tested to relieve symptoms of chronic lung disease at Box Hill Hospital and Austin Health.

Professor Charlie Xue, Continue reading

How a Physician Cured Her Son’s Autism…

Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride has a full-time medical practice in the United Kingdom where she treats children and adults with autism, learning disabilities, neurological disorders, psychiatric disorders, immune disorders, and digestive problems.

Here, she shares her insights about Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS), which can make a child particularly prone to vaccine damage, and the GAPS Nutritional program; a natural treatment for autism, ADHD, dyslexia, dyspraxia, depression and schizophrenia.

Sources:

Natasha Campbell-McBride Interview Video Transcript

I’m thrilled to share this interview with you as Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride presents a truly fascinating and elegant description of the foundational conditions that contribute to autism, along with a pragmatic approach to help circumvent and stem the autism epidemic, which has been a perplexing puzzle for most of us.

Dr. Campbell is a medical doctor with a postgraduate degree in neurology. She worked as a neurologist and a neurosurgeon for several years before starting a family. When her first-born son was diagnosed autistic at the age of three, she was surprised to realize that her own profession had no answers… Continue reading

Telemedicine Finally Taking off in Rural Areas

The National Broadband Network, with its promised high speeds, is still a long way off, but already thousands of patients in rural and remote Australia are using slower broadband for their day to day healthcare needs.

Doctors and clinicians are eagerly awaiting the NBN, but telehealth experts are already trialing new technology that will save not just money but lives.

This is health care in the not too distant future, but the tools will be familiar to many tech savvy households – high definition television, video conferencing and the latest iPad. Continue reading

An Extra 5 Years Of Life An Unexpected Benefit Of Osteoporosis Treatment

Osteoporosis is a serious and disabling condition that affects around 2 million Australians. Someone is admitted to hospital with an osteoporotic fracture every 5-6 minutes, averaging 262 hospitalizations each day. It has already been shown by Garvan and others that osteoporotic fractures increase a person’s risk of dying, even after relatively minor fractures if that person is elderly.

“Osteoporosis is a big societal burden and remains a poorly understood and severely undertreated disease in Australia,” said Eisman.

“Only about 30% of women and 10% of men with osteoporosis receive treatment, which is unacceptable when you consider that people could be helped, and death could be delayed by several years. There is good evidence – even without this study – that treating osteoporosis reduces fractures and reduces mortality.”

“While osteoporosis is clearly under-recognized and under-treated, the findings of this study are important to better understanding the benefits of these treatments and may directly influence doctors’ practice. It was unexpected and remarkable to find that not only osteoporosis but also life expectancy appear to be improved for people taking bisphosphonates,” said Dr Christine Bennett, Chair of the Bupa Health Foundation Steering Committee and Bupa Australia’s Chief Medical Officer.

“Bupa Health Foundation is proud to have supported this valuable research since 2005 and we see its findings as a major breakthrough that can now guide doctors’ treatment decisions for these very vulnerable older people.”

Like any pharmaceutical product, bisphosphonates may have unpredictable side effects in a small minority of people and should only be used for their approved purpose.

*Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study

The Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study is an ongoing population-based study that started in 1989 in Dubbo, a city with a population of 32,000 in regional New South Wales. The study cohort is women (1223) and men (898) over the age of 60. Approximately 60% of eligible people were recruited into the study.

Acknowledgements And Disclosure Summary

This work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council Australia, The Bupa Health Foundation, the Ernst Heine Foundation, and untied grants from Amgen, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Sanofi- Aventis, Servier and Novartis. There was no financial compensation paid to any of the participants in the study. The study sponsors had no role in the study design, nor the collection, analysis and interpretation of the data.

Higher Heart Attack Risk from Broken Heart

LONDON – A broken heart can prove to be a serious health threat, say Australian researchers who found that people mourning the loss of a loved one are six times more likely to suffer cardiac arrest.

As per a Heart Foundation study of the physical changes suffered immediately after a profound loss, grieving people were at significantly higher risk of heart problems, said lead researcher Thomas Buckley.

The study was conducted to “shed fresh light on why people traumatized by the loss of a loved one are more susceptible to having a heart attack”, reports The Daily Express.

A team at the University of Sydney, Australia, studied 80 bereaved adults to reach the conclusion.

Lead author Dr Thomas Buckley said: “Emotional and mood changes were greatest during this time.

“Overall, the bereaved had -increases in anxiety, depression and anger, with elevated stress hormones and -reduced sleep and appetite.

“They also showed increases in blood pressure and heart rate, – together with immune and blood -clotting changes – all changes that could contribute to a heart attack.”

The study was published in the -Internal Medicine Journal.

Australian Firm to Sell World’s First Armpit Testosterone Lotion in US

An Australian company will sell the world’s first armpit testosterone lotion in American stores next year after receiving approval from the US Food and Drug Administration, news.com.au reported Friday.

The lotion, created by Melbourne-based drug delivery firm Acrux, treats men with hypogonadism, a disease which produces low testosterone levels and includes symptoms such as erectile dysfunction, low sexual desire and performance.

Axiron — an anagram for “iron ax” — is the first testosterone replacement therapy to be applied in the armpit, with current treatments including a gel for the upper body and regular injections.

Only available by prescription, Axiron will be sold for the first time next year in the US, which has the world’s largest market for testosterone replacement, worth about $1 billion a year.

Acrux CEO Richard Treagus said: “What we’ve found is the population is aging in the US, Australia and around the world, and with [that comes] greater awareness around men’s health issues; more are now receiving treatment for them.”