This Common Medicinal ‘Weed’ Can Stop Bleeding and Improve your Meals

Capsella bursa-pastorisAlthough often dismissed as a weed, one of the most widespread flowering plants in the world is actually a highly useful plant both medicinally and nutritionally. This “weed,” commonly known as shepherd’s purse, can be eaten raw or cooked, and is particularly prized for its ability to stop both external and internal bleeding.

Native to Europe, shepherd’s purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris) has now become Continue reading

Stop the Bleeding with These Alternative Cures

One area that homeopathy specializes in is first aid. In this case, bleeding is a first aid-worthy problem. Anything and everything that pricks, slices, cuts, punctures, or rips can cause us to bleed. This story presents six homeopathic remedies you might not have considered.

(Of course, this is all for minor cases of bleeding, Continue reading

Extra Treatment during Prolapse Repair Reduces Incontinence Rate

Complications also more common in treated group, results of NIH study show

Surgery to repair pelvic organ prolapse often carries a risk of incontinence. To avoid scheduling a second surgery, some women may opt to have a second procedure to reduce incontinence at the time of their prolapse repair surgery.

A study fund Continue reading

Stinging Nettle Health Benefits for Home Remedies that Treat Just About Everything

It may be a brash statement to say that one prickly green herb is the panacea for almost everything that ails you; but, in the case of stinging nettles, it’s mostly true. If there’s one plant to have on hand at all times that provides a cure for arthritis, an herbal treatment for allergies, relieves hair loss, treats Celiac disease, bleeding, bladder infections, skin complaints, neurological disorders and a long list of other conditions — it’s nettle leaf. Continue reading

Four Dangers of Mixing Drugs and Supplements

Any items you might take — herbs, dietary supplements, other natural products, or functional foods such as energy drinks and nutritional bars — can interact with each other and with medications. Doctors Health Press devotes its pages to natural remedies, but this is a reminder that you still must be aware of the risks of interactions. Or, at the very least, your doctor should always know what you are taking. Continue reading

Injectable Progesterone Contraceptives May be Associated with Poor Periodontal Health

Injectable progesterone contraceptives may be associated with poor periodontal health, according to research in the Journal of Periodontology. The study found that women who are currently taking depotmedroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) injectable contraceptive, or have taken DMPA in the past, are more likely to have indicators of poor periodontal health, including gingivitis and periodontitis, than women who have never taken the injectable contraceptive. DMPA is a long-lasting progestin-only injectable contraceptive administered intermuscularly every three months.

Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the gum tissue and bone that supports the teeth. Gingivitis, the mildest form of gum disease, causes the gums to become red, swollen, and bleed easily. Periodontitis is the most severe form of gum disease and can lead to tooth loss. Additionally, research has associated gum disease with other chronic inflammatory diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. Continue reading

New Device Removes Stroke-Causing Blood Clots Better than Standard Treatment

An experimental device for removing blood clots in stroke patients dramatically outperformed the standard mechanical treatment, according to research presented by UCLA Stroke Center director Dr. Jeffrey L. Saver at the American Stroke Association’s 2012 international conference in New Orleans on Feb. 3.

The SOLITAIRE Flow Restoration Device is among an entirely new generation of devices designed to remove blood clots from blocked brain arteries in patients experiencing stroke. It has a self-expanding, stent-like design and, once inserted into a clot using a thin catheter tube, it compresses and traps the clot. The clot is then removed by withdrawing the device, thus reopening the blocked blood vessel.

In the first U.S. clinical trial of SOLITAIRE, Continue reading

Cameras in Pills: the State of the Art

Cameras ingested in the form of a pill make it possible to examine areas of the stomach and intestines that cannot be reached using traditional equipment. Norwegian researchers are busy developing the next-generation camera pill.

Camera pills are used to take photos inside the stomach and intestine in order to detect abnormalities such as bleeding or cancer. They are highly effective in examining the small intestine, where the traditional methods of endoscopy or gastroscopy fall short.

Norwegian researchers from many areas of expertise have joined forces in an interdisciplinary project to develop a new, advanced type of camera pill. Preliminary test results are encouraging.

In order to develop a camera pill with the desired properties, new technology is needed. The pill must be able to transmit information by radio waves through the patient. To keep pill size to a minimum, Continue reading

Heart Patients Only Should Use Aspirin

LONDON – Low dose aspirin is widely given to people who have had heart problems

The use of aspirin to ward off heart attacks and strokes in those who do not have obvious cardiovascular disease should be abandoned, researchers say.

The Drugs and Therapeutics Bulletin (DTB) study says aspirin can cause serious internal bleeding and does not prevent cardiovascular disease deaths.

It says doctors should review all patients currently taking the drug for prevention of heart disease.

The Royal College of GPs says it supports the DTB’s recommendations.

Low-dose aspirin is widely used to prevent further episodes of cardiovascular disease in people who have already had problems such as a heart attack or stroke.

Given the evidence, the DTB’s statement on aspirin prescription is a sensible one

This approach – known as secondary prevention – is well-established and has confirmed benefits.

But many thousands of people in the UK are believed to be taking aspirin as a protective measure before they have any heart symptoms.

Between 2005 and 2008, the DTB said four sets of guidelines were published recommending aspirin for the “primary prevention” of cardiovascular disease – in patients who had shown no sign of the disease.

These included people aged 50 and older with type 2 diabetes and those with high blood pressure.

But the DTB said a recent analysis of six controlled trials involving a total of 95,000 patients published in the journal the Lancet does not back up the routine use of aspirin in these patients because of the risk of serious gastrointestinal bleeds and the negligible impact it has on curbing death rates.

Dr Ike Ikeanacho, editor of the DTB, said: “Current evidence for primary prevention suggests the benefits and harms of aspirin in this setting may be more finely balanced than previously thought, even in individuals estimated to be at high risk of experiencing cardiovascular events, including those with diabetes or elevated blood pressure.”

Professor Steve Field, chairman of the Royal College of General Practitioners, said the DTB was an excellent source of independent advice for medical professionals.

He said: “Given the evidence, the DTB’s statement on aspirin prescription is a sensible one.

“The Royal College of General Practitioners would support their call for existing guidelines on aspirin prescription to be amended, and for a review of patients currently taking aspirin for prevention.”

June Davison, senior cardiac nurse at the British Heart Foundation said: “It is well established that aspirin can help prevent heart attacks and strokes among people with heart and circulatory disease – so this group of people should continue to take aspirin as prescribed by their doctor.

However, for those who do not have heart and circulatory disease the risk of serious bleeding outweighs the potential preventative benefits of taking aspirin.

“We advise people not to take aspirin daily, unless they check with their doctor.

“The best way to reduce your risk of developing this disease is to avoid smoking, eat a diet low in saturated fat and rich in fruit and vegetables and take regular physical activity.”