Dosages for Natural Allopathic Medicine

dosagesnaturalOffering a revolution in medicine, that any  person, patient, doctor or alternative healthcare practitioner can practice,  Natural Allopathic Medicine offers hope in the 21st century to rich  and poor alike. This chapter is an overview of dosages for most of the Natural  Allopathic protocol.

Dosages are not an exact science for it  varies so much from person to person and from one medical situation to another.  Great weight differences need to be estimated in. Obviously infants cannot  handle what a full-grown adult could but do not tell that to pediatricians who  support vaccinationists who do not pay keen attention to medical Continue reading

Does Grapefruit Really Help Reduce Body Weight?

Have you ever wondered whether there’s any real benefit to following a grapefruit diet? Does it really work? According to researchers at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee, grapefruit does help when it comes to shedding pounds — but only modestly.

The researchers based this health advice on a recent clinical trial they conducted. They noted at the outset of the study that reducing dietary energy density has proven to be an effective strategy to promote weight control. This effect appears most strong when a low-energy dense “preload” is eaten before meals. In other words, eating foods low in energy output before a meal, should, in theory, help to control weight. What is up for debate, according to the research team, is what the best food would be for the preload. So they set out to investigate the effects of grapefruit, grapefruit juice, and water preloads consumed before meals.

Eighty-five obese adults participated in the study. Continue reading

The Key to Stronger Leg Muscles

As we grow older, it’s no secret that our muscles seem to lose some of their strength. This can be a little problematic when it comes to our legs. Leg muscles help to keep us on our feet and moving about in the world doing the things we like to do. Is there a way you can safeguard some of your length strength as you age, instead of letting it drain away and set you up for potential falls and disability? According to researchers at the University of New Hampshire, leg strength may be directly related to body weight.

The purpose of the researchers’ study was to determine if excess fat negatively affects strength and walking gait performance in overweight, older women. Twenty-five older women (65-80 years old) were separated into normal weight and overweight groups. Strength of the knee extensors and flexors and ankle flexors was measured during various tests.

The research team found that, relative to mass, overweight older women had a 38% lower knee torque than normal weight women. Walking speed was slower in overweight women and was related to strength and fat mass. Overweight participants also had an11% lower vertical ground reaction force relative to mass, an eight percent slower stride rate, 12% shorter strides, and 13% longer foot-ground contact times. The research team concluded that overweight, older women showed altered gait and reduced walking performance related to poor relative strength of lower-extremity muscles.

The researchers summarized their study Continue reading

Heart May Be Protected by Large Thighs

COPENHAGEN – Men and women with thighs over 60cm (23.6in) in circumference have a lower risk of heart disease and early death, a study of 3,000 people suggests.

The relationship remains even when body fat, smoking and blood cholesterol are taken into account, a Danish team says.

Those with narrow thighs may not have enough muscle mass to deal with insulin properly, raising the risk of diabetes and, in turn, heart disease, they say.

Experts cautioned that the research needed corroborating.

Some said it was too early to change current advice on eating and exercise for heart health, but the researchers said thigh size could be used as a marker for at-risk patients.

The study, published in the British Medical Journal, followed men and women in Denmark for more than 10 years.

They were measured for height, weight and thigh, hip and waist circumference and their overall percentage of body fat was calculated.

It’s a very simple, very crude measure but it seems to have an individual effect. And it may be a way for doctors to assess risk

The thigh measurement was taken just below the gluteal fold, which is the crease caused by your buttocks.

Researchers also looked at the activity levels of the participants, whether they smoked, their blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

They then monitored incidence of heart disease over 10 years and death rates over 12-and-a-half years.

During this time, 257 men and 155 women died, 263 men and 140 women developed cardiovascular disease and 103 men and 34 women suffered from heart disease.

The team at the Copenhagen University Hospital found that those with the smallest thighs – below 55cm – had twice the risk of early death or serious health problems.

Professor Berit Heitmann, who led the research, said: “The increased risk was independent of abdominal and general obesity and lifestyle and cardiovascular risk factors such as blood pressure.

“Additionally we found that the risk was more highly related to thigh circumference than to waist circumference.

“It’s a very simple, very crude measure but it seems to have an individual effect. And it may be a way for doctors to assess risk.

“The nice thing is that if you have a small thigh you can do something about it through exercise.”

Previous studies have suggested that a waist circumference of over 35in (88.9cm) for a woman and 40in (101.6cm) for a man indicated a high risk of developing diabetes and heart disease.

Professor Heitmann’s team says the risk of narrow thighs could be associated with too little muscle mass.

They say this can lead to the body not responding to insulin properly, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes and, in the long-run, heart disease.

Too little fat can also lead to adverse changes in the way the body breaks down food.

British Heart Foundation senior cardiac nurse Judy O’Sullivan said: “There is insufficient evidence to confirm that a low thigh circumference affects a person’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

“However, low muscle mass is associated with low levels of physical activity which is an established risk factor for developing heart disease.”

Tam Fry, of the National Obesity Forum, agreed that the research needed further corroboration, saying: “This is a very interesting and slightly counter-intuitive piece of work but it has to be respected because of the numbers looked at and the duration of the research.

This must be great news for people with larger thighs. What I find fascinating is that researchers are now going back to the drawing board and looking for every possible way of mitigating obesity.”