HPV Vaccine Maker’s Study Proves Natural HPV Infection Beneficial, Not Deadly

hpv_vaccine_natural_antibody_protectsBehind every vaccine is an assumption. That HPV causes cervical cancer, that cervical cancer causes death, and that a vaccine can effectively interfere with this linear relationship is the assumption to be examined in this article. Cervarix is a vaccine recommended to girls beginning as early as 9 years old, intended to protect against HPV strains 16 and 18 upon completion of a 3 dose series. It is an aluminum-containing product, with notable “immunogenicity”.  Continue reading

Natural Herbal HPV “Cure” Discovered

curcuDespite the widespread belief that HPV infection is a lethal force against which we only have vaccination and watchful waiting to defend ourselves, both ancient herbal medicine and our body’s inherent immune defenses have newly been confirmed Continue reading

The HPV Vaccine Debate: Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell

hpvKatie Couric opened up a Pandora’s box of sorts simply by airing testimony about the HPV vaccine’s lack of effectiveness and safety, but shouldn’t she be commended for asking questions the mainstream media is afraid to touch? We live in a time when simply questioning the safety and effectiveness of vaccines has become, Continue reading

It’s Not Honey, But Bees Make It, and It Fights Cancer

While honey has recently gained a reputation as an excellent health food, there is another bee-produced product that may do even more. Propolis—a substance bees manufacture from tree sap and buds, and Continue reading

Fight HPV Infections with This

The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is in the health news a lot these days — and for good reason. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection today. As a virus, HPV is also incredibly versatile, with over 100 different strains.

Of course, not all the variations of HPV infection are dangerous; some are fought off by your immune system before any harm is done. Other forms of the virus, on the other hand, could lead to cancers in the reproductive organs of both men and women, or the throat. As much as 75% of sexually active people are likely to get at least one genital HPV infection in their lifetime.

In particular, HPV can cause health problems for women. The development of cervical cancer is thought to be directly linked to the presence of HPV. Of course, it’s true that other factors are involved in the onset of cervical cancer — HPV likely doesn’t act completely on its own. Researchers point to oxidative stress as a promoting factor in the development of HPV-induced cervical tumors.

Now, guess Continue reading

These Berries Help Prevent Cervical Cancer

What could be better than a delicious fruit that is also a cancer-fighting food? Raspberries are an antioxidant food that contains some special compounds called “ellagitannins.” This family of compounds, which are almost exclusive to the raspberry, is reported to have anti- cancer activity.

In recent health news, a study performed at the Ohio State University has found that raspberry extract could inhibit cervical cancer growth.

Cervical cancer is the second most common female cancer worldwide. It is a challenge for doctors to treat this type of cancer. Because of this, the researchers at Ohio University set out to investigate food-based cancer preventative measures — specifically, the raspberry. Three human cervical cancer cell lines were treated with a black raspberry extract for the clinical trial. Various tests Continue reading

Oral Sex Bigger Cause of Throat Cancer than Tobacco

LONDON – A virus spread during oral sex is the main cause of throat cancer in people under 50 years of age.

Scientists say the human papilloma virus (HPV) spread during unprotected sex is to blame for a disturbing rise in potentially deadly oral cancers in the last few decades.

Doctors have called for boys to be vaccinated against HPV just like teenage girls to stop the spread of the disease.

HPV is best known as the cause of around 70 percent of cervical cancers. Since 2008, girls aged 12 and 13 have been vaccinated against the virus in schools. However, it can also cause warts and other cancers, the Daily Mail reports.

Cancers of the mouth and oropharynx – the top of the throat – used to be mainly diagnosed in older men who drink or smoke. But increasingly, it is being seen in younger men.

Maura Gillison of Ohio State University in Columbus said the sexually transmitted HPV was a bigger cause of some oral cancers than tobacco.

She said: “We don’t know from strict scientific evidence whether the vaccine will protect from oral HPV infections that lead to cancer,” according to a Ohio State University statement.

“Those of us in the field are optimistic it will – the vaccines in every anatomical site looked at so far have been shown to be extraordinarily effective, about 90 percent effective, at preventing infections.”

40 Percent of Cancers Are Preventable

About 40 percent of cancers could be prevented if people stopped smoking and overeating, limited their alcohol, exercised regularly and got vaccines targeting cancer-causing infections, experts say.

To mark World Cancer day on Thursday, officials at the International Union Against Cancer released a report focused on steps that governments and the public can take to avoid the disease.

According to the World Health Organization, cancer is responsible for one out of every eight deaths worldwide — more than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. WHO warned that without major changes, global cancer deaths will jump from about 7.6 million this year to 17 million by 2030.

In the report from the International Union Against Cancer, experts said about 21 percent of all cancers are due to infections like the human papillomavirus, or HPV, which causes cervical cancer, and hepatitis infections that cause stomach and liver cancer.

While the vaccines to prevent these cancers are widely available in western countries, they are almost nonexistent in the developing world. Nearly 80 percent of the world’s cervical cancer deaths are in poor countries, according to the agency.

In Western nations, experts said many of the top cancers like those in the lungs, breasts and colon might be avoided if people changed their lifestyle habits.