More Coffee May Lead To A Longer Life

More Coffee May Lead To A Longer LifeTired of apologizing for your addiction to a morning mug (or two or three) of coffee? No more need for guilt – that java may be just what the doctor should order.

According to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine, older adults who drink coffee have a lower risk of Continue reading

Ayurvedic Herbal Formula Proven to Treat Hepatitis B

cyperClinical and laboratory research from India has proven that an Ayurvedic formula used for liver infections halts the often deadly hepatitis B virus.

Indian scientists utilized a formula that has been referred to as HD-03/ES. This is an Ayurvedic herb liver formulation made up of the extracts of two herbs: Cyperus rotundus (also referred to as Java grass or Nut grass) and Cyperus scariosus (referred to as Cypriol or Nagarmotha).

The researchers tested four different concentrations of this herbal combination Continue reading

Dandelion Health Benefits

dandelion… a common weed has such astonishing medicinal benefits that gardeners may want to start growing it instead of uprooting it?

While gardeners can’t get rid of the dreaded dandelion fast enough, Western medicine is eager for more of this potent medicinal plant.  Used for centuries by herbalists for healing and preventative purposes, scientific scrutiny confirms that Continue reading

New ‘Traffic Light’ Test Could Save Lives with earlier Diagnosis of Liver Disease

A new ‘traffic light’ test devised by Dr Nick Sheron and colleagues at University of Southampton and Southampton General Hospital could be used in primary care to diagnose liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in high risk populations more easily than at present.

Liver disease develops silently without symptoms, and many people have no idea they have liver failure until it is too late – one-third of people admitted Continue reading

Coffee Consumption Reduces Fibrosis Risk in those with Fatty Liver Disease

Increased coffee intake significantly decreases risk in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis patients

Caffeine consumption has long been associated with decreased risk of liver disease and reduced fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. Now, newly published research confirms that coffee caffeine consumption reduces the risk of advanced fibrosis in those with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Findings published in the February issue of Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that increased coffee intake, specifically among patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), decreases risk of hepatic fibrosis. Continue reading

Medical Breakthrough: The Root Cause of Chronic Disease That You Can Stop Naturally

Medical researchers have discovered that a rogue molecule called galectin-3 is directly involved in chronic and life-threatening diseases such as heart disease, cancer, cirrhosis, arthritis and Alzheimer’s. But there’s a natural way to fight back against galectin-3’s destruction: modified citrus pectin, the only proven natural galectin-3 inhibitor. Continue reading

Milk Thistle Provides a Protective Shield to the Liver, Heart and Brain

The liver is one of the most critical organs essential to human health. It serves more than 300 functions in the body to detoxify against chemical and environmental intrusions, and it promotes metabolic function as well. Silymarin is commonly known as milk thistle, and new science is emerging to validate the healing potential of this powerful plant. Publishing in the journal Hepatitis Monthly, researchers provide solid evidence that natural milk thistle extracts can halt and even reverse the effects of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an affliction affecting as much as a third of the adult population. Supplementation with milk thistle will dramatically lower the risks associated with fatty liver disease, atherosclerosis and cognitive dysfunction.

NAFLD is a significant health concern that is growing at an unprecedented rate due to the obesity and diabetes epidemic currently gripping most western societies. The condition is caused in part by excess accumulation of fats (triglycerides) in the cellular matrix of the liver that results in suboptimal function of the organ. Left unchecked, the disease can result in cell injury and damage, in inflammation and ultimately in cirrhosis as the liver becomes less able to perform the multitude of tasks essential to life. Continue reading

New Gene Sites Affecting Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Discovered

NAFLD is a condition where fat accumulates in the liver (steatosis) and can lead to liver inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH) and permanent liver damage (fibrosis/cirrhosis). NAFLD affects anywhere from 11% to 45% of some populations and is associated with obesity, hypertension, and problems regulating serum lipids or glucose.

“These findings will help us to better diagnose, manage, and treat NAFLD in the future and help explain why some but not all people with obesity develop particular complications of obesity; some carry genetic variants that predispose them to some but not other metabolic diseases.” says lead author Elizabeth K. Speliotes, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., an Assistant Professor of Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine, and Computational Medicine Continue reading

Your Hands Reflect Your Health

They’re one of the most important parts of our body when it comes to day-to-day activities; without them we couldn’t cut vegetables, grip pliers, or text our friends. They’re revealing, too: Not only do scars and age spots recount our personal history but mystics all the way back to prehistory have “read” our futures in their lines and whorls.

But what if your hands could say more about you than that? What if, looking down at your palms and the five digits attached to them, you could discover early signs of dangerous diseases you didn’t yet know you had? “It used to be common for doctors to look at the hands for important clues to overall health,” says endocrinologist Kenneth Blanchard of  Continue reading

Coffee May Stop Liver Disease

Coffee May Stop Liver Disease

Researchers have found another good reason to go to the local espresso bar: Several cups of coffee a day could halt the progression of liver disease, a study showed Wednesday.

Sufferers of chronic hepatitis C and advanced liver disease who drank three or more cups of coffee per day slashed their risk of the disease progressing by 53 percent compared to patients who drank no coffee, according to the study, led by Neal Freedman of the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

For the study, 766 participants enrolled in the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-Term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) trial  all of whom had hepatitis C which had not responded to treatment with anti-viral drugs  were asked to report how many cups of coffee they drank every day.

The patients were seen every three months during the 3.8-year study, and liver biopsies were taken periodically to determine the progression of liver disease.

“We observed an inverse association between coffee intake and liver disease progression,” meaning patients who drank three or more cups of java were less likely to see their liver disease worsen than non-drinkers, wrote the authors of the study, which will be published in the November issue of Hepatology.

The researchers put forward several ways in which coffee intake might protect against liver disease, including reducing the risk of Type 2 diabetes, which has been associated with liver illness; or by reducing inflammation, which is thought to cause fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver.

Even caffeine, the chemical that gives a cup of coffee its oomph, came under the spotlight, having been found in previous studies to inhibit liver cancer in rats.

But drinking black or green tea, which also contain caffeine, had little impact on the progression of liver disease, although there were few tea drinkers in the study.

According to the World Health Organization, 3 million to 4 million people contract hepatitis C each year.

Seventy percent of cases become chronic and can cause cirrhosis or liver cancer.