Blood Lead Levels High in 535,000 Kids in the USA

leadStory at-a-glance

  • 535,000 US kids aged 1 to 5 years have blood lead levels higher than 5 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL), the “level of concern” at which health problems may occur
  • Lead may cause permanent damage to your brain and nervous system; children under 6 are most at risk for lead exposure and related health problems
  • Common sources of lead exposure include lead-based paint, Continue reading

Lobelia also Known as Indian Tobacco

Overview:

Lobelia (Lobelia inflata), also called Indian tobacco, has a long history of use as an herbal remedy for respiratory conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, and cough. Historically, Native Americans smoked lobelia as a treatment for asthma. In the 19th century, American physicians prescribed lobelia to induce vomiting in order remove toxins from the body. Continue reading

Manage your Blood Sugar and Diabetes with these Four Herbs

Modern medicine may have its place in emergency care, but when it comes to the prevention or management of chronic illness, many conventional treatments are lacking. In the case of diabetes, the battle is loudly proclaimed to be one of blood sugar regulation. “Check your sugar, and take your drugs as prescribed,” seems the tired message of most industry doctors to a steadily increasing number of diabetics.

But where modern medicine falls short in its rigid symptoms-only approach, Continue reading

30 Stunning Facts They Don’t Want You to Know about Gardasil and HPV Vaccines

Guarantees, insurance, promises.

Concerns over safety, security, and health make most people apprehensive about the future on some level. Guarding against future unknowns has become a big part of the American economy. You can get a warranty on almost anything with a battery, take out insurance on Continue reading

Is West Nile Still a Threat to You?

Make sure you wear long pants and shirts when outside between sunset and sunrise. At least that’s the recommendation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

It seems that the number of West Nile cases is on the rise. The CDC reported that, in 2009, there were 720 confirmed cases of West Nile and 32 fatalities. In 2010, numbers were up, with 1,021 confirmed cases and 57 deaths.

Peak mosquito season is in August and September and the number of West Nile cases is expected to rise even more in 2011.

If you are infected with West Nile, Continue reading

Remote IT Allows Doctors to Care for ICU Patients from a Distance

When Leo Dufault had what should have been a fatal heart attack almost three years ago, it was an alert bystander who knew CPR that kept him alive. But once he was at a community hospital, it was a critical care physician — who was 25 miles away — who saved his life through a remote IT system.

The electronic intensive care unit, or eICU, where Dr. James Shaffer was located allowed him to remotely instruct and watch emergency room physicians as they put Dufault into a coma using therapeutic hypothermia to lower his brain’s temperature to 91.4 degrees Fahrenheit to reduce damage from loss of oxygen.

“This isn’t a guy who fell down and bumped his head. He was dead, Continue reading

Scientists Unveil Brain Area Involved In Alert Status Control

JERUSALEM –  Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have gained fresh insights into how anaesthesia and anaesthesia-like states are controlled in the brain, opening the door to possible new future treatments of various states of loss of consciousness, such as reversible coma.

Marshall Devor, the Cecile and Seymour Alpert Professor of Pain Research, graduate student Ruth Abulafia and research associate Dr. Vladimir Zalkind say that they have basically discovered a brain area that participates in the control of “alert status”.

Their findings suggest that a small group of neurons near the base of the brain, in the mesopontine tegmentum, has executive control over the alert status of the entire cerebrum and spinal cord, and can generate loss of pain sensation, postural collapse, and loss of consciousness through specific neural circuitry.hey came to this conclusion after observing that microinjection of tiny quantities of certain anaesthetic drugs into this newly discovered “centre of consciousness” in laboratory rats induced a profound suppressive effect on the activity of the cerebral cortex.

The researchers admit that it is not certain that their findings will translate reliably from rats to man.

They, however, insist that in case their findings do replicate in man, the new knowledge could contribute to the ability of medical science to treat disorders of consciousness and its loss, such as insomnia, excessive sleepiness and even coma.

Perhaps by direct electrical stimulation of the cells in question, it might prove possible to arouse a patient from coma, say the researchers.

They further say that the discovery of a specific cluster of neurons that control the brain’s state of consciousness can be expected to lead to the beginnings of an understanding of the actual wiring diagram that permits a biological machine, the brain, to be conscious.

A research article describing their study has been published in the Journal of Neuroscience.