The Most Effective Strategies for Eliminating Cellulite

celluliteStory at-a-glance

  • The dimpling effect that is the hallmark of cellulite occurs when fat cells push against the surrounding subcutaneous connective tissue in your skin.      Liposuction, creams and wraps only temporarily reduce the appearance of cellulite. Without continual treatment, cellulite just reappears
  • In order to eliminate cellulite, you must eliminate the excess fat deposits.  Continue reading

Introducing the Diabetes-Preventing Herb

“Gymnema sylvestre” is an herb that has been used in India for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It is less well known in North America, though, over the past few years, studies have been conducted to measure the effectiveness of gymnema.

Take, for instance, a clinical trial that took place at King’s College London. There, researchers looked at the effects of a gymnema extract in a small cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. After administration of the extract for 60 days, the researchers found that there was a significant increase in circulating insulin in the participants. This surge in insulin helped to reduce fasting and after-meal blood glucose levels.

The research team concluded that a gymnema extract may provide a potential alternative therapy Continue reading

Bee Pollen Health Benefits Nature’s Fountain of Youth

There are many naturopathic doctors and health practitioners that regard bee pollen as nature’s “fountain of youth” because of its amazing health benefits, age reversing, disease-fighting, and health-boosting effects… and super nutritional properties.

Bee pollen is a fine powdery substance collected by honeybees from the stamens of flowering plants, and stored in honeycomb hives. It is regarded by many as a highly nutritious and complete food — one which contains a rich supply of the B-complex vitamins and folic acid, vitamins A, C, E, carotenoids, amino acids, some essential fatty acids, and a wide variety of minerals.

Some nutritionists even insist that one can live on bee pollen alone. This must be one reason why 10,000 tons Continue reading

Getting a Grip on Childhood Obesity

American adults are overweight and obese, which is a huge problem for our healthcare system, tax dollars, productivity and quality of life. But the fact that our kids are increasingly obese means we may be dooming the next generation to an unhappy lifetime of chronic disease. We have to take action now to halt the juvenile obesity epidemic, or the consequences will be tragic.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), “Obesity now affects 17 percent of all children and adolescents in the United States — triple the rate from just one generation ago.” That 17 percent equates to 12.5 million obese children, ages 2 to 19.

In its 2011 “Children’s Food Environment State Indicator Report,” the CDC blames a good part of this problem on the serving and advertising of “sugar drinks and less healthy foods on school campuses.” Ads sell junk foods to kids, while parents feed their children what they ask for instead of providing balanced meals. Added to that, kids are eating supersized portions of foods containing too much sugar and fat.

If we consider the alarming numbers of inner-city children with weight problems, it’s obvious that kids don’t get enough exercise and don’t have access to safe places to play. Even for those interested in outdoor activity, finding a safe place or even getting to one is an issue. In its “State Indicator Report on Physical Activity,  Continue reading

Study Claims Junk Food Cravings Trigger the Same as Drug Addict Cravings for Hit

The brain’s response to the tempting appeal of a sugary, fatty milkshake or to a bag of salty, greasy snack chips appears to be the same response a drug addicts brain exhibits when anticipating the next “hit,” suggests a new study published in the journal Archives of General Psychiatry. Ashley Gearhardt of Yale University and her colleagues found that the addictive nature of many junk foods is literally the same as the addictive nature of drugs.

The team analyzed the brains of a group of 48 young women, who were tempted with either a chocolate milkshake or a tasteless beverage solution. Based on data gathered using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the team discovered that the women’s anterior cingulated cortex and the medial orbit frontal cortex — two areas of the brain known to respond to drug addiction — both responded to sensory cravings for the milkshake, regardless of the women’s weight.

“If certain foods are addictive, this may partially explain  Continue reading

Imagination Tricks the Brain into Eating Less

Simply imagining eating a certain food may help you eat less of it, new research indicates.

The finding challenges the assumption that thinking about a favorite food makes you crave it more and likely to eat more of it when it’s available.

In a series of experiments involving dozens of volunteers at Carnegie Mellon University, researchers found that people who repeatedly imagined eating a certain food, such as a cube of cheese or an M&M candy, subsequently ate less of it than they otherwise would have.

Simple Secrets to Portion Control and Healthy Eating

Suppressing Thoughts about a Desired Food Not a Good Strategy

“These findings suggest that trying to suppress one’s thoughts of desired foods in order to curb cravings for those foods is a fundamentally flawed strategy,” says Carey Morewedge, PhD, of Carnegie Mellon and author of the study.

“We think these findings will help develop future interventions to reduce cravings for things such as unhealthy food, drugs, and cigarettes; and hope they will help us learn how to help people make healthier food choices,” Morewedge says in a news release.

In one of Morewedge’s experiments, a group that imagined putting three quarters into a laundry machine and then imagined eating 30 M&Ms one at a time ate significantly fewer of the candies when given a bowl of M&Ms afterward, compared to a group that imagined putting 33 coins into a laundry machine and a third group that imagined inserting 30 quarters into a laundry machine and then imagined eating three M&Ms.

In other experiments, people were asked to imagine themselves eating cheese or another food, or doing something else completely different, like repeatedly putting coins into a laundry machine.

In each case where the group repetitively imagined eating a food, the researchers detected a gradual reduction in motivation to obtain food and a decrease in its subsequent intake, a process they called habituation. The research points to the conclusion that repetitive mental imagery has a different effect than picturing a single mental image, according to the study.