Researchers Find our Inner Reptile Hearts

The genetic building blocks behind the human heart’s subtle control system have finally been identified.

The lizard has a heart that is virtually indistinguishable from a human embryonic heart. Continue reading

5 Foods That Slow Down Your Body’s Aging Process

agingDid you Know…… that the nucleic acids in fish, fruits, beans, legumes, and chlorella have powerful rejuvenating properties that slow down the aging process?When one thinks of vital nutrients … vitamins, minerals, proteins and essential fatty acids may come to mind, but rarely do nucleic acids top the list.  Continue reading

Salmonella in Pets and Humans

On April 6, 2012, the United States Food and Drug Administration announced a voluntary recall of Diamond Naturals Lamb Meal and Rice dry dog food. Since the initial recall, several other brands of food manufactured in a South Carolina plant have been voluntarily recalled for possible Salmonella contamination. Voluntary recalls of pet food are not uncommon, Continue reading

The Top 10 Autism-causing Chemicals in Your Home

Important to all of us is the health of children. Our own children, our grandchildren, nieces, nephews, godchildren. When it comes to environmental toxins affecting our most susceptible, innocent members of society, we must all stop and take notice. That’s why we are reporting today on a paper published that presents the top-10 chemicals highly likely to contribute to autism Continue reading

Scripps Research Institute Scientists Show how a Gene Duplication Helped our Brains Become ‘Human’

Extra copy of brain-development gene allowed neurons to migrate farther and develop more connections; findings may offer clue to autism and schizophrenia

What genetic changes account for the vast behavioral differences between humans and other primates? Researchers so far have catalogued Continue reading

Why the Medical Establishment Will Never Find a Cause or Cure for Autism

No matter how you look at it, autism research is big business. Just like the Susan G. Komen Foundation’s “Race for the Cure” for breast cancer, the autism industry pretends to be looking for the causes of autism and how to cure it, when in reality it is on a never-ending hunt for money to fund so-called research into the bodily changes associated with autism in order to push more profit-generating screenings and drug therapies on the public.

The worldwide propaganda campaign that continues to repeat the lie that vaccines are in no way related to autism is one great example of the medical establishment covering up one of the most obvious causes of autism. Rather than actually investigate how the body responds to vaccines, and how these responses are clearly associated with the neurological damage that is part and parcel of autism symptoms, researchers continue to churn out studies that completely avoid any investigation of this or any other likely cause of autism.

Instead, the vast majority of autism studies, Continue reading

Improving Your Genetic Health

The genes you inherit from your parents strongly affect your health and longevity. But you can influence your genes in a healthy fashion using the proper herbs, nutrition and lifestyle choices. Research shows that the natural chemicals in particular foods and botanicals send signals to DNA, optimizing cellular function and keeping illness at bay. Even positive emotions can help DNA yield better health.

Redrawn Blueprints

We are all born with a certain genetic makeup, and scientists once believed that this blueprint was permanent and unchangeable — essentially that our DNA dictated our destiny. However, an exciting new field of genetic science is emerging which demonstrates that our gene expression can be influenced and altered for better or worse, based on internal and external triggers. These influences on our genes can change how we age, how our bodies react to lifestyle and environmental factors, how we resist illness and even how we gain weight.

Epigenetics is the study of how various factors affect our genes. Advances in this field are showing how environment, diet, lifestyle and even thoughts and emotions can have just as powerful an impact on gene function as biological lineage. Small changes in the expression of one master regulator gene, originating in a number of potential influences, Continue reading

Extend Your Life by Reducing Calories

Calories are at the center of a long list of health tips; as in limiting calories could help you with a multitude of health benefits. In the latest health news on calories, researchers found that you could slow down aging by taking in fewer calories each passing day. Now that is something to which you want to pay attention.

Not only can aging be slowed down, but limiting caloric intake could help prevent the development of age-related diseases, such as cancer and type 2 diabetes. And the earlier you start, the greater the effect.

The key, according to a new study, is an enzyme called “peroxiredoxin.” This may hold the key to the aging process. Restricting calories slows aging by helping activate this enzyme, Continue reading

Turkey Tail Mushroom Proven by NIH Study to Fight Breast Cancer

Did you know… that extracts from Turkey Tail mushrooms have been proven by an NIH study to cure cancer — especially breast cancer?

Some of the most exciting recent discoveries of Turkey Tail mushrooms’ cancer-fighting power are connected to world-renowned mycologist Paul Stamets. Mycologists are scientists who specialize in the branch of biology dedicated to the study of fungi.

Mycology includes studying fungi for genetic and biochemical properties and potential usefulness to humans, including medicinal applications.

Undoubtedly the most well-known and highly valued fungi-derived medicine is the life-saving antibiotic penicillin. But other fungi are highly medicinal as well, as Paul Stamets learned firsthand. Continue reading

Study Reveals the Molecular Mechanism that Promotes Cancer Development

Jerusalem scientists identify molecular basis for DNA breakage, which results in the development of cancer.

The molecular basis for the breakage of DNA – the hallmark of cancer cells – has been identified by Hebrew University of Jerusalem scientists. The important discovery will be published on Friday in the prestigious journal Molecular Cell.

The DNA encodes all the genetic information needed to build the cell’s proteins. Thus, breaks in the DNA disrupt the proteins and lead to changes in cell function. These changes can lead to defects in the control of cellular proliferation, which results in the development of cancer.

Using cutting-edge technologies, researchers Prof. Batsheva Kerem and doctoral student Efrat Ozeri-Galai, of the Alexander Silverman Institute of Life Sciences in the HU’s Faculty of Science, were able to characterize for the first time the DNA regions that are the most sensitive to breakage in early stages of cancer development.

This is a breakthrough in our understanding of the effect of the DNA sequence and structure on its replication and stability, they said on Thursday. Continue reading

Natural Selective Breeding Works Better than GMOs

Twenty years of careful research and development on a new apple variety has produced an amazing fruit that New Zealand’s Scoop news states is “sweet, tangy and delicious.” And the most amazing aspect of Swiss orchardist and researcher Markus Kobelt’s new RedLove apple variety is that it was designed to be resistant to disease, appealing to the palate, and easy to grow — and all without the use of any sort of artificial genetic modification.

For many years, researchers from other organizations have been working on creating a genetically modified (GM) apple variety that would be higher in nutrients, more resistant to disease and pests, and appealing to growers and consumers. But Kobelt beat them to the punch  Continue reading

Closing in on Genes that Help One Lives to 100

The oldest among us seem to have chosen their parents well. Researchers closing in on the impact of family versus lifestyle find most people who live to 100 or older share some helpful genes.

But don’t give up on diet and exercise just yet.

In an early step to understanding the pathways that lead to surviving into old age, researchers report in Thursday’s online edition of the journal Science that a study of centenarians found most had a number of genetic variations in common.

That doesn’t mean there’s a quick test to determine who will live long and who won’t – a healthy lifestyle and other factors are also significant, noted the team led by Paola Sebastiani and Thomas T. Perls of Boston University.

Nevertheless, Perls said the research might point the way to determining who will be vulnerable to specific diseases sooner, and there may be a possibility, down the road, to help guide therapy for them.

The team looked at the genomes of 1,055 Caucasians born between 1890 and 1910 and compared them with 1,267 people born later.

By studying genetic markers the researchers were able to predict with 77 percent accuracy which gene groups came from people over 100.

“Seventy-seven percent is very high accuracy for a genetic model,” said Sebastiani. “But 23 percent error rate also shows there is a lot that remains to be discovered.”

The centenarians could be fitted into 19 groups with different genetic signatures, they found.

Some genes correlate with longer survival, others delayed the onset of various age-related diseases such as dementia.

“The signatures show different paths of longevity,” Sebastiani said.

In general, the centenarians remained in good health longer than average, not developing diseases associated with old age until in their 90s, according to the study.

The researchers were surprised, Sebastiani said, that they found little difference between the centenarians and the control group in genetic variations that predispose people to certain illnesses.

“We found that what predisposes to a long life is not lack of disease associated variants, but the presence of protective variants,” she said at a briefing.

In addition, 40 percent of “super-centenarians” aged 110 and over had three specific genetic variants in common.

While this study, begun in 1995, focused on Caucasians, the researchers said they plan to extend it to other groups, including studying Japan, which has large numbers of elderly.