Read Body Language with the Help of Mirror Neurons

 How Do Mirror Neurons Work?

 When you see a basketball player setting up to shoot, your brain relates to the movement – your body doesn’t mimic the action, but you know exactly what is going to happen next – that’s how mirror neurons work. Continue reading

Do This One Thing to Prevent Many Diseases

Not long ago, a rubber stamp was affixed to the idea that you can stop the spread of viruses simply by washing your hands regularly. Viral infections are a big threat to humanity, making them fodder for Hollywood in such films as the “Contagion.” Researchers have found that we could help Continue reading

Nine Ways to Avoid Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome, or CTS, is an occupational hazard for anyone who does repetitive work with their hands and/or fingers. Basically, if you sit at a keyboard, work on an assembly line, use tools, sew, and play a musical instrument — or any number of other activities — you’re at risk for the painful condition.

The difficulty with CTS is that it can quickly become a chronic condition that shows up immediately at the start of any activity involving the hands. It’s excellent health advice to make sure you prevent the condition from occurring in the first place.

With that in mind, here are nine tips for minimizing your risk for CTS:

1. Use your whole hand and all of your fingers when you grip an object.

2. Use a tool whenever possible, instead of flexing your wrists.

3. Make sure your posture is correct. When using the computer, sit straight in your chair and keep your wrists and hands straight and your forearms parallel.

4. Adjust your computer screen so that it is about two feet away from you and just below your line of sight. Continue reading

Your Hands Reflect Your Health

They’re one of the most important parts of our body when it comes to day-to-day activities; without them we couldn’t cut vegetables, grip pliers, or text our friends. They’re revealing, too: Not only do scars and age spots recount our personal history but mystics all the way back to prehistory have “read” our futures in their lines and whorls.

But what if your hands could say more about you than that? What if, looking down at your palms and the five digits attached to them, you could discover early signs of dangerous diseases you didn’t yet know you had? “It used to be common for doctors to look at the hands for important clues to overall health,” says endocrinologist Kenneth Blanchard of  Continue reading

What Is Frostbite?

Please call 911 immediately if you are having chest pain, difficulty breathing, severe bleeding, sudden weakness or numbness, or if you think you have a medical emergency.

Frostbite refers to the freezing of body tissue (usually skin) that results the blood vessels contract and cause loss of oxygen to the affected body parts. Feeling is lost and the color changes in these tissues as well. It most commonly affects areas that are further away from the body core and have less blood flow. These include your feet, hands, nose, and ears.

There are three degrees of cold injury: frostnip, superficial frostbite, and deep frostbite. Although children, older people, and those with circulatory problems are at greater risk for frostbite, most cases occur in adults between 30 and 49.

If you have frostbite, you may not realize at first that anything is wrong because the affected area will be numb. With prompt medical attention, most people recover fully from frostbite. However, if severe frostbite occurs, permanent damage is possible depending on how long and how deeply the tissue is frozen.  In severe cases, blood flow to the area may stop and blood vessels, muscles, nerves, tendons, and bones may be permanently affected. If the frozen tissue dies, the affected area may need to be amputated.

What Causes Frostbite?

Frostbite is caused by prolonged exposure to cold temperatures, particularly when accompanied by a low wind-chill factor or by more brief exposure to very cold temperatures.

Shot for Preventing Genital Warts Works in Men

WASHINGTON – A vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), which can be transmitted by sexual contract, prevents 90 percent of genital warts in men.

A four-year clinical trial and double-blind study that included 4,065 healthy men aged 16-26 years, spanning 71 sites in 18 countries, provides the first reported results of using the HPV vaccine as a preventive measure in men.

HPV causes common warts of the hands and feet, as well as lesions of the mucous membranes of the oral, anal, and genital areas. The virus can also be found in cancer of the cervix.

Of those patients, 85 percent reported having exclusively female sexual partners, with the remainder self-identified as having sex with men, the New England Journal of Medicine reports.

While the HPV vaccine was approved in 2006 for girls to prevent cervical cancer, the vaccine’s benefit for young men was not initially addressed, according to a University of California statement.

Yet, infection and diseases caused by HPV are common in men, the researchers said, including genital warts, which are one of the leading sexually transmitted diseases (STD) for which treatment is sought nationwide.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that half of all sexually active Americans will get HPV at some point in their lives.

“This is an exciting development in the STD world,” said Joel Palefsky, University of California professor of medicine who led the research along with epidemiologist Anna R. Giuliano from the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute.

“It shows that if we vaccinate males early enough, we should be able to prevent most cases of external genital warts in this population,” he added.