Oregano – The Powerful Bacteria-Killing Herb That With the Highest Known Source of Antioxidants

oreganoOregano – an herb with an estimated 4 times the concentration of antioxidants as blueberries, 12 times that of oranges, 30 times that of potatoes and 42 times that of apples. It is well known as the most powerful antibiotic, which provides lots of healing properties.

The super oil of oregano has been used as a natural remedy in many ways, and it should be diluted before using: Continue reading

Magnesium: An Invisible Deficiency That Could Be Harming Your Health

1234Story at-a-glance 

Only about 25 percent of US adults are getting the recommended daily amount of magnesium (and even that may not be enough)

Magnesium deficiency may trigger 22 medical conditions, from anxiety to diabetes Continue reading

17 Children Die after Receiving Hepatitis B Vaccine

vaccStory at-a-glance

Over a period of two months, eight infants in China died within hours, and in some cases minutes, of receiving hepatitis B vaccines

Nine other deaths among Chinese children aged 5 and Continue reading

Big Pharma Invents yet Another Disease to Sell Deadly Drugs: ‘Shift Work Disorder’

shiftNow Used to Push Medication that May Kill You

Ever heard of “shift work disorder?” It’s a new disease being played up by the pharmaceutical industry to sell drugs so dangerous that even the home page of the drug website admits the drug may kill you. Continue reading

Oil Pulling: Ancient Secret for Optimal Health

oil_pulling_benefitsWhat Is Oil Pulling?

Oil pulling is an ancient Indian folk remedy first mentioned in the early Ayurvedic text, the Charaka Samhita, which was believed to have been written approximately 1500 years ago.

One oil pulls by simply swishing a tablespoon of oil (sesame, coconut and sunflower are commonly recommended) in one’s mouth for approximately 15-20 minutes on an empty stomach and then spitting it out. [For a “how to” video click here]

The Charaka Samhita describes Continue reading

Five Unusual Chinese Treatments for a Cold

Today we present five sure-fire healing secrets from deepest China that you might be able to use to battle the nasty yet formidable common cold. To have these secrets under your belt means you are truly in the know.

1. Andrographis  Continue reading

Try This Ancient Technique for Pain Relief

Pain is a symptom associated with just about every disease you can think of. There are different types of pain and different intensities of pain. Although it’s a symptom universally disliked by everyone, pain is often a just a warning that something is wrong. If you have stomach pain, maybe you’re eating a food you’re allergic to. If you have back pain, maybe you’re wearing the wrong shoes Continue reading

Lasting Symptoms possible after Kids’ Concussions: Study

Some children may have memory and attention problems up to a year after a concussion, issues that can be tied to a lower quality of life and an increased risk of needing extra help in school, according to a U.S. study.

Concussion is by far the most common form of brain injury and has received increasing attention in the media, and millions of U.S. children get a concussion every year — but many don’t go to the hospital, said Keith Yeates at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Ohio, who worked on the study.

“Our study pretty convincingly shows that the vast majority of kids do very well after a mild traumatic brain injury,” Yeates said. Continue reading

Natural Ways to Banish Colds and Flu

Once the temperature drops, cold and flu season looms over health like dark storm clouds. Our fast-paced lifestyles, holiday travels and festivities, along with seasonal changes lead most of us to believe that colds and flu are inevitable facts of winter. But a healthy diet, lifestyle choices and supplementation offers protection year-round with natural solutions that help strengthen your defenses and keep you vibrant and energized.

Cold or Flu? Know the Difference

As an integrative physician, my patients often come to me with an important question: “How can I tell whether I have a cold or the flu?”

Both colds and flu are respiratory illnesses, but each is caused by different viruses. Colds are usually milder and present symptoms that include nasal stuffiness, sneezing and a runny nose. Adults and older children generally have minimal or no fever, but infants and toddlers often run a fever in the 100-102 degrees Fahrenheit range. Depending on which virus is the offender, a cold may also produce a headache, cough, postnasal drip, burning eyes, muscle aches or a decreased appetite — but the most prominent cold symptoms are usually in the nasal passages. Continue reading

Native American Herbal Remedies No. 2

(Please use the search function to find Native American Herbal Remedies #1)

Diabetes

Wild Carrot –  The Mohegans steeped the blossoms of this wild species in warm water when they were in full bloom and took the drink for diabetes.

Devil’ Club –  The Indians of British Columbia utilized a tea of the root bark to offset the effects of diabetes.

Diarrhea

Blackcherry A tea of blackberry roots was the most frequently used remedy for diarrhea among Indians of northern California.

Wild Black Cherry The Mohegans allowed the ripe wild black cherry to ferment naturally in a jar about one year than then drank the juice to cure dysentery.

Dogwood – The Menominees boiled the inner bark of the dogwood and passed the warm solution into the rectum with a rectal syringe made from the bladder of a small mammal and the hollow bone of a bird.

Geranium  – Chippewa and Ottawa tribes boiled the entire geranium plant and drank the tea for diarrhea.

White Oak – Iroquois and Penobscots boiled the bark of the white oak and drank the liquid for bleeding piles and diarrhea.

Black Raspberry The Pawnee, Omaha, and Dakota tribes boiled the root bark of black raspberry for dysentery.

Star Grass – Catawbas drank a tea of star grass leaves for dysentery.

Digestive Disorders

Dandelion – A tea of the roots was drunk for heartburn by the Pillager Ojibwas. Mohegans drank a tea of the leaves for a tonic.

Yellow Root – A tea from the root was used by the Catawbas and the Cherokee as a stomach ache remedy.

Fevers

Dogwood The Delaware Indians, who called the tree Hat-ta-wa-no-min-schi, boiled the inner bark in water, using the tea to reduce fevers.

Willow – The Pomo tribe boiled the inner root bark, then drank strong doses of the resulting tea to induce sweating in cases of chills and fever. In the south, the Natchez prepared their fever remedies from the bark of the red willow, while the Alabama and Creek Indians plunged into willow root baths for the same purpose.

Feverwort – The Cherokees drank a decoction of the coarse, leafy, perennial herb to cure fevers.

Headache

Pennyroyal – The Onondagas steeped pennyroyal leaves and drank the tea to cure headaches.

Heart and Circulatory Problems

Green Hellebore – The Cherokee used the green hellebore to relive body pains.

American Hemp and Dogbane – Used by the Prairie Potawatomis as a heart medicine, the fruit was boiled when it was still green, and the resulting decoction drunk. It was also used for kidney problems and for dropsy.

Hemorrhoids

White Oak The Menominee tribe treated piles by squirting an infusion of the scraped inner bark of oak into the rectum with a syringe made from an animal bladder and the hollow bone of a bird.

Inflammations and Swellings

Witch Hazel The Menominees of Wisconsin boiled the leaves and rubbed the liquid on the legs of tribesmen who were participating in sporting games. A decoction of the boiled twigs was used to cure aching backs, while steam derived by placing the twigs in water with hot rocks was a favorite Potawatomi treatment for muscle aches.

Influenza  

Native Hemlock – The Menominees prepared a tea if the inner bark and drank it to relieve cold symptoms. A similar tea was used by the Forest Potawatomis to induce sweating and relieve colds and feverish conditions.

Insect Bites and Stings

Fendler Bladderpod – The Navajos made a tea and used it to treat spider bites.

Purple Coneflower The Plains Indians used this as a universal application for the bites and stings of all crawling, flying, or leaping bugs. Between June and September, the bristly stemmed plant, which grows in dry, open woods and on prairies, bears a striking purplish flower.

Stiff Goldenrod – The Meskwaki Indians of Minnesota ground the flowers into a lotion and applied it to bee stings.

Trumpet Honeysuckle The leaves were ground by chewing and then applied to bees stings.

Wild Onion and Garlic – The Dakotas and Winnebagos applied the crushed bulbs of wild onions and garlics.

Saltbush – The Navajos chewed the stems and placed the pulpy mash on areas of swelling caused by ant, bee and wasp bites. The Zunis applied the dried, powdered roots and flowers mixed with saliva to ant bites.

Broom Snakeweed – The Navajos chewed the stem and applied the resin to insect bites and stings of all kinds.

Tobacco – A favorite remedy for bee stings was the application of wet tobacco leaves.

 Insect Repellents and Insecticides

Goldenseal – The Cherokee pounded the large rootstock with bear fat and smeared it on their bodies as an insect repellent. It was also used as a tonic, stimulant, and astringent.

Rheumatism

Pokeweed – Indians of Virginia drank a tea of the boiled berries to cure rheumatism. The dried root was also used to allay inflammation.

Bloodroot – A favorite rheumatism remedy among the Indians of the Mississippi region – the Rappahannocks of Virginia drank a tea of the root.

Sedatives

Wild Black Cherry – The Meskwaki tribe made a sedative tea of the root bark.

Hops – The Mohegans prepared a sedative medicine from the conelike strobiles and sometimes heated the blossoms and applied them for toothache. The Dakota tribe used a tea of the steeped strobiles to relieve pains of the digestive organs, and the Menominee tribe regarded a related species of hops as a panacea.

Wild Lettuce – Indigenous to North American, it was used for sedative purposes, especially in nervous complaints.

Thrush

Geranium The Cherokee boiled geranium root together with wild grape, and with the liquid, rinsed the mouths of children affected with thrush.

Persimmon  The Catawba stripped the bark from the tree and boiled it in water, using the resulting dark liquid as a mouth rinse.