Migraines and Nutrition

Researchers decided recently to test whether children with migraines would be better off taking nothing at all than consuming popular prescription drugs.

And guess what? Nothing won.

Here’s what happened. A group of Midwestern medical researchers banded together to analyze Continue reading

Exercise May Lead to Better School Performance for Kids with ADHD

A few minutes of exercise can help children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder perform better academically, according to a new study led by a Michigan State University researcher.

The study, published in the current issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, shows for the first time that kids with ADHD can better drown out Continue reading

Kids with Cerebral Palsy May Benefit from Video Game Play

New research published in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Like their healthy peers, children with disabilities may spend too much time in front of a video screen. For children with cerebral palsy (CP), this leads to an even greater risk of being overweight or developing health issues such as diabetes or musculoskeletal disorders. Continue reading

Lasting Symptoms possible after Kids’ Concussions: Study

Some children may have memory and attention problems up to a year after a concussion, issues that can be tied to a lower quality of life and an increased risk of needing extra help in school, according to a U.S. study.

Concussion is by far the most common form of brain injury and has received increasing attention in the media, and millions of U.S. children get a concussion every year — but many don’t go to the hospital, said Keith Yeates at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Ohio, who worked on the study.

“Our study pretty convincingly shows that the vast majority of kids do very well after a mild traumatic brain injury,” Yeates said. Continue reading

Kids’ ER Visits for Psychiatric Care Inching Up

Emergency room doctors are seeing more and more kids for mental health problems, and many of them are uninsured, researchers said at the annual conference of the American Academy of Pediatrics in Boston.

A study found that between 1999 and 2007, 279 million children went to U.S. emergency departments. Over that period, the proportion of visits caused by mental illness rose from 2.4 percent to three percent.

Underinsured children accounted for as many as 54 percent of the psychiatric emergencies in 2007, up from 46 percent in 1999, Dr. Zachary E. Pittsenbarger and his team concluded based on data Continue reading

Kids with Blocked Tear Ducts at Higher Risk for Lazy Eye

Early comprehensive eye examination encouraged in the Journal of AAPOS

Amblyopia, sometimes referred to as “lazy eye,” is a cause of poor vision in children. It occurs in about 1.6% to 3.6% of the general population. Early treatment is critical, as the first few years are the most important in the development of eyesight. If amblyopia is not treated in the first 6 to 10 years, poor vision becomes permanent and cannot be corrected.

A recent study published in the Journal of the AAPOS, the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, has found that children under the age of 3 with a nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO), or blocked tear duct, were at an increased risk for developing amblyopia. About 6% of children are born with blocked tear ducts.

Authors Noelle S. Matta, CO, CRC, COT, and David I. Silbert, MD, FAAP, of the Family Eye Group in Lancaster, PA, report that of the 375 children studied, 22% had amblyopia risk factors, an 8-fold increase compared with the rate in the general population. More than 63% of the children with risk factors Continue reading

Television Food Commercials Influencing Kids to Demand for Unhealthy Foods

Parents have suspected all along that television commercials are leading their kids to request sugary, fatty or salty foods, and now researchers at the Institute of Psychology, Health and Society in the U.K., have confirmed this suspicion.

A team of scientists found that children who watched commercials for fast food or unhealthy snacks before a cartoon were more likely to choose such foods after their program, when compared to kids who viewed advertisements for toys.

“Obesity in young children is now a major health concern around the world. Our studies highlight that there are global connections between advertising, food preferences and consumption,” said researcher Emma Boyland.

She noted that  Continue reading

Severe Eczema Linked to Lasting Milk, Egg Allergy in Kids

Children with more severe cases of the skin condition known as eczema are less likely than others to outgrow their milk or egg allergy, the results of a new study suggest.

Unlike peanut or seafood allergies, children often outgrow allergies to egg and milk, according to a team of researchers from Duke University Medical Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, National Jewish Health Center, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and the University of Arkansas Medical School.

The study included more than 500 children, aged 3 months to 15 months, with egg or milk allergy. They were assessed for eczema and categorized as “none-mild” or “moderate-severe.” Eczema, also often called atopic dermatitis, usually takes the form of swollen, irritated, itchy skin.

During two years of follow-up, milk allergy was outgrown  Continue reading

Family Mealtimes Play Key Role in Asthmatic Kids’ Health

WASHINGTON – A new study has found that the quality of family interactions during mealtime affects the health of children with asthma.

The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Rochester Medical Center, and Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, New York, looked at 200 families with children ages 5 to 12 who had persistent asthma, observing how they interacted during a video-recorded meal in their homes.

Although mealtimes lasted on average only 18 minutes, the study found that the quality of social interactions as families ate was directly related to the children’s health, including how their lungs worked, their asthma symptoms, and the quality of their lives.

Simply put, in families that spent mealtimes talking about the day’s events, showing genuine concern about their children’s activities, and turning off electronic devices, children had better health.

Families in which the primary caregiver had less education, minority families, and single-parent families experienced more disruptions during mealtime-including watching TV and talking on cell phones-and spent less time talking about the day’s events.

This led to a more disorganized mealtime, which, in turn, was related to poorer health for the children in these families.

“Mealtimes represent a regular event for the vast majority of families with young, school-age, and adolescent children,” noted Barbara H. Fiese of the University of Illinois.

“They provide an optimal setting for public health initiatives and prevention efforts, and can be considered by policymakers and practitioners as a straightforward and accessible way to improve the health and wellbeing of children with asthma,” she added.

The study has appeared in the January/February issue of the journal, Child Development.

Timer May Help Kids Bladder Control Problems

 

Wearing a programmable wristwatch could help children manage their daytime bladder control problems, a new study suggests.

For children with urinary incontinence, the first approach to treatment is usually behavior modification – sometimes called bladder training or “urotherapy.” Tactics like changing drinking habits and taking scheduled trips to the bathroom can be effective, but often the challenge with children is getting them to stick with a routine.

When it comes to scheduled bathroom breaks, many children simply forget. So for the new study, Danish researchers looked at whether outfitting kids with a sports watch timed to go off at regular intervals would help.

They found that among 58 children who had not improved with standard urotherapy, adding the wristwatch allowed 35 (60 percent) to at least partly respond to therapy by the end of the 12-week treatment period. A partial response meant that the children reported a 50 percent to 89 percent reduction in their average number of “wet days” per week.

In contrast, only 18 percent of children who stuck with standard therapy alone showed a partial response, and none became completely continent.

Past studies have suggested that about half of kids with urinary incontinence can become “dry” with behavioral changes that typically include altering fluid intake, learning proper “toilet posture,” and scheduled bathroom breaks, noted Dr. Soren Hagstroem, the lead researcher on the current study.

These findings, Hagstroem told Reuters Health in an email, indicate that the timed bathroom breaks are “the crucial element” in this regimen.

They also suggest that “scheduled voiding is especially effective when the children have a timer watch to remind them to go,” said Hagstroem, of Aarhus University Hospital in Skejby, Denmark.

The study, published in the Journal of Urology, included 60 children between 5 and 14 years old with daytime urinary incontinence at least once per week, along with overactive bladder. Overactive bladder — a bladder that frequently contracts, often suddenly — is believed to affect most children with urinary incontinence, Hagstroem noted.

The children spent four weeks on standard urotherapy, during which time two became completely continent during the day. The rest of the children were then randomly assigned to continue with standard urotherapy alone or to start wearing a sports watch programed to remind them of their scheduled bathroom trips.

After 12 weeks, 60 percent of the 30 children in the wristwatch group had at least a partial improvement — including nine children who were completely “dry” based on their self-reports, one who reported at least a 90 percent reduction in wet days, and eight who were partial responders.

Moreover, the researchers found that seven months later, the nine children who were completely continent had remained so, and another seven had become continent. Six of those 16 children no longer needed to use their watches.

Kids may also grow out of urinary incontinence: according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, about 10 percent of 5-year-olds experience incontinence but only 5 percent of 10-year-olds and 1 percent of 18-year-olds do.

According to Hagstroem, most children with overactive bladder and urinary incontinence can be treated without medications or surgery, which may be offered as options when behavioral changes fail.

Hagstroem recommended that parents try the wristwatch tactic to boost the chances that behavioral changes will work — if their child is at least 5 years old and the incontinence is not caused by an anatomical abnormality or a neurological disorder (which is the case for only a small number of children, the researcher noted).

The wristwatch did not appear to help, however, with bedwetting — a problem reported by most of the children in the study. None of the children in the wristwatch group showed an improvement in bedwetting during the 12-week treatment period.

That finding is “interesting” because behavioral therapy is typically recommended for nighttime urinary incontinence as well, according to an editorial comment by Dr. Tryggve Neveus of Uppsala University Children’s Hospital in Sweden published with the report.

Still, this study suggests that timed bathroom trips are a “crucial” part of urotherapy for daytime incontinence, writes Neveus. “Maybe we should recommend that the timer watch be included from the start and not as a later add-on in resistant cases.”

Lack of Food Puts Kids at Risk for Asthma, Other Chronic Ills

 Children and youth who don’t have enough to eat are at increased risk of poor health, and repeated episodes of hunger may put them at risk for chronic diseases such as asthma, researchers say.

 The finding is from an analysis of data from a Canadian survey of 5,809 children aged 10 to 15 years and 3,333 youth aged 16 to 21 years, which was conducted from 1994 to 2004-2005.

 During that time, 3.3 percent of children and 3.9 percent of youth experienced hunger at some point and 1.1 percent of children and 1.4 percent of youth went hungry on two or more occasions, the study found.

 In the final round of the survey, 13.5 percent of children and 28.6 percent of youth reported poor health. Rates of poor health among those who’d experienced hunger at some point were higher than among those who had never gone hungry (32.9 percent of children and 47.3 percent of youth who had gone hungry were in poor health, compared with 12.8 percent of children and 27.9 percent of youth who had not).

 The researchers also found that youth who went hungry more than once during the survey were at increased risk for asthma and other chronic illnesses.

 Sharon Kirkpatrick, of the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, at the time of the study and now at the U.S. National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues published their findings in the August issue of the journal Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

 In 2008, about 15 percent of American households were affected by food insecurity, defined by the researchers as running out of food or lacking the money to buy food. That’s an increase from 11 percent in 2007 and the highest rate since monitoring began in 1995, according to background information in the study.

 “The mechanism by which childhood hunger negatively affects health is not well understood,” Kirkpatrick’s team wrote. “Food insecurity has been associated with emotional and psychological stress among children, which could exert a negative effect on general health and contribute to heightened risk of chronic diseases.”

 The findings add to evidence that “hunger is a serious risk factor for long-term poor health among children and youth, pointing to the relevance of severe food insecurity as an identifiable marker of vulnerability,” the study authors concluded.

Some Acceptable and Effective Way to Discipline Kids

There will probably always be a great deal of debate over the right and wrong way to discipline kids. Each parent has their own ideas and their own past experiences to draw upon and what you may do may not be the same as what your neighbor does when it come to discipline. However, there are acceptable and effective ways to discipline kids to teach them right from wrong.

Should You Spank Your Kids?

When you consider whether or not you should spank your kids, ask yourself whether or not you would like to be spanked when you do something wrong. How embarrassed would you be? How humiliated would you be? Would you learn anything from it?

Spanking is not the answer – and it never was. Kids are human. They have thoughts, feelings, and opinions – just like you. They should be treated with the same dignity and respect that you expect from others for yourself.

Do Time-Outs Work for Kids?

Time outs work for younger children. The idea is to separate the child from the group or the activity, where they will sit quietly alone. This gives them the opportunity to think about what they have done wrong.

Some people say that time outs are ineffective because the child will not spend time thinking about what he or she has done wrong. This isn’t exactly true. The child wants to get back to what they were doing or having fun. While there will be more timeouts, your child has learned that there is a consequence for what they’ve just done wrong.

How Much Punishment is the Right Amount?

There does come a point in time when timeouts no longer work effectively for kids. The age of the child varies when this stops being effective, based on the child. When timeouts stop working, other forms of punishment should be used. Children can be sent to their rooms or denied certain privileges. Grounding works well for teenagers. Taking away beloved objects or amusement also works. These objects may include the television, video games, computers, telephones, or favorite pastimes.

The point of any type of punishment should be to teach the child that he or she has done something that is unacceptable, and that this action should not be repeated. Kids will be kids – and they may repeat the action two or three more times before they get the picture, but if they are treated with respect and dignity, they do indeed eventually learn right from wrong.

Is Marijuana a Medicine?

Charlene DeGidio never smoked marijuana in the 1960s, or afterward. But a year ago, after medications failed to relieve the pain in her legs and feet, a doctor suggested that the Adna, Wash., retiree try the drug.

Ms. DeGidio, 69 years old, bought candy with marijuana mixed in. It worked in easing her neuropathic pain, for which doctors haven’t been able to pinpoint a cause, she says. Now, Ms. DeGidio, who had previously tried without success other drugs including Neurontin and lidocaine patches, nibbles marijuana-laced peppermint bars before sleep, and keeps a bag in her refrigerator that she’s warned her grandchildren to avoid.

“It’s not like you’re out smoking pot for enjoyment or to get high,” says the former social worker, who won’t take the drug during the day because she doesn’t want to feel disoriented. “It’s a medicine.”

For many patients like Ms. DeGidio, it’s getting easier to access marijuana for medical use. The U.S. Department of Justice has said it will not generally prosecute ill people under doctors’ care whose use of the drug complies with state rules. New Jersey will become the 14th state to allow therapeutic use of marijuana, and the number is likely to grow. Illinois and New York, among others, are considering new laws.

As the legal landscape for patients clears somewhat, the medical one remains confusing, largely because of limited scientific studies. A recent American Medical Association review found fewer than 20 randomized, controlled clinical trials of smoked marijuana for all possible uses. These involved around 300 people in all—well short of the evidence typically required for a pharmaceutical to be marketed in the U.S.

Doctors say the studies that have been done suggest marijuana can benefit patients in the areas of managing neuropathic pain, which is caused by certain types of nerve injury, and in bolstering appetite and treating nausea, for instance in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. “The evidence is mounting” for those uses, says Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California, San Diego.

But in a range of other conditions for which marijuana has been considered, such as epilepsy and immune diseases like lupus, there’s scant and inconclusive research to show the drug’s effectiveness. Marijuana also has been tied to side effects including a racing heart and short-term memory loss and, in at least a few cases, anxiety and psychotic experiences such as hallucinations. The Food and Drug Administration doesn’t regulate marijuana, so the quality and potency of the product available in medical-marijuana dispensaries can vary.

Though states have been legalizing medical use of marijuana since 1996, when California passed a ballot initiative, the idea remains controversial. Opponents say such laws can open a door to wider cultivation and use of the drug by people without serious medical conditions. That concern is heightened, they say, when broadly written statutes, such as California’s, allow wide leeway for doctors to decide when to write marijuana recommendations.

But advocates of medical-marijuana laws say certain seriously ill patients can benefit from the drug and should be able to access it with a doctor’s permission. They argue that some patients may get better results from marijuana than from available prescription drugs.

Glenn Osaki, 51, a technology consultant from Pleasanton, Calif., says he smokes marijuana to counter nausea and pain. Diagnosed in 2005 with advanced colon cancer, he has had his entire colon removed, creating digestive problems, and suffers neuropathic pain in his hands and feet from a chemotherapy drug. He says smoking marijuana was more effective and faster than prescription drugs he tried, including one that is a synthetic version of marijuana’s most active ingredient, known as THC.

The relatively limited research supporting medical marijuana poses practical challenges for doctors and patients who want to consider it as a therapeutic option. It’s often unclear when, or whether, it might work better than traditional drugs for particular people. Unlike prescription drugs it comes with no established dosing regimen.

“I don’t know what to recommend to patients about what to use, how much to use, where to get it,” says Scott Fishman, chief of pain medicine at the University of California, Davis medical school, who says he rarely writes marijuana recommendations, typically only at a patient’s request.

Researchers say it’s difficult to get funding and federal approval for marijuana research. In November, the AMA urged the federal government to review marijuana’s position in the most-restricted category of drugs, so it could be studied more easily.

Gregory T. Carter, a University of Washington professor of rehabilitation medicine, says he’s developed his own procedures for recommending marijuana, which he does for some patients with serious neuromuscular conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, to treat pain and other symptoms. He typically urges those who haven’t tried it before to start with a few puffs using a vaporizer, which heats the marijuana to release its active chemicals, then wait 10 minutes. He warns them to have family nearby and to avoid driving, and he checks back with them after a few days. Many are “surprised at how mild” the drug’s psychotropic effects are, he says.

States’ rules on growing and dispensing medical marijuana vary. Some states license specialized dispensaries. These can range from small storefronts to bigger operations that feel more like pharmacies. Typically, they have security procedures to limit walk-in visitors.

At least a few dispensaries say they inspect their suppliers and use labs to check the potency of their product, though states don’t generally require such measures. “It’s difficult to understand how we can call it medicine if we don’t know what’s in it,” says Stephen DeAngelo, executive director of the Harborside Health Center, a medical-marijuana dispensary in Oakland, Calif.

Some of the strongest research results support the idea of using marijuana to relieve neuropathic pain. For example, a trial of 50 AIDS patients published in the journal Neurology in 2007 found that 52% of those who smoked marijuana reported a 30% or greater reduction in pain. Just 24% of those who got placebo cigarettes reported the same lessening of pain.

Marijuana has also been shown to affect nausea and appetite. The AMA review said three controlled studies with 43 total participants showed a “modest” anti-nausea effect of smoked marijuana in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Studies of HIV-positive patients have suggested that smoked marijuana can improve appetite and trigger weight gain.

Donald Abrams, a doctor and professor at the University of California, San Francisco who has studied marijuana, says he recommends it to some cancer patients, including those who haven’t found standard anti-nausea drugs effective and some with loss of appetite.

Side effects can be a problem for some people. Thea Sagen, 62, an advanced neuroendocrine cancer patient in Seaside, Calif., says she expected something like a pharmacy when she went to a marijuana dispensary mentioned by her oncologist. She says she was disappointed to find that the staffers couldn’t say which of the products, with names like Pot ‘o Gold and Blockbuster, might boost her flagging appetite or soothe her anxiety. “They said, ‘it’s trial and error,’ “she says. “I was in there flying blind, looking at all this stuff.”

Ms. Sagen says she bought several items and tried one-eighth teaspoon of marijuana-infused honey. After a few hours, she was hallucinating , too dizzy and confused to dress herself for a doctor’s appointment. Then came vomiting far worse than her stomach upset before she took the drug. When she reported the side effects to her oncologist’s nurse and her primary-care physician, she got no guidance. She doesn’t take the drug now. But with advice from a nutritionist, her appetite and food intake have improved, she says.

Other marijuana users may experience the well-known reduction in ability to concentrate. At least a few users suffer troubling short-term psychiatric side effects, which can include anxiety and panic. More controversially, an analysis published in the journal Lancet in 2007 tied marijuana use to a higher rate of psychotic conditions such as schizophrenia. But the analysis noted that such a link doesn’t necessarily show marijuana is a cause of the conditions.

Long-term marijuana use can lead to physical dependence, though it is not as addictive as nicotine or alcohol, says Margaret Haney, a professor at Columbia University’s medical school. Smoked marijuana may also risk lung irritation, but a large 2006 study, published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, found no tie to lung cancer.

Some studies and reviews examining the possible medical uses, and side effects, of marijuana are being conducted by.

    * Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research, University of California

    * American College of Physicians

    * Institute of Medicine

To read more on Marijuana and its effectiveness, the following periodicals have spent time reviewing certain aspects of medical marijuana.

To treat pain:

    * Neurology

    * Journal of Pain

    * Neuropsychopharmacology

To treat nausea:

    * Annals of Internal Medicine

    * Cancer

    * Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior

To restore appetite:

    * Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    * Psychopharmacology

To treat spasticity:

    * Neurologist

Overviews of Potential Side Effects:

    * Canadian Medical Association Journal

    * Clinical Toxicology

Mental Effects:

    * Neuropsychology Review

    * Lancet

Withdrawal:

    * Current Psychiatry Reports

    * Current Opinion in Psychiatry

Effects on Lungs

    * Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

 

 

Here Are Some Terms Used in Homeopathy – Easier to Understand

Here Are Some Terms Used in Homeopathy – Easier to Understand

Terms of homeopathy seem confusing sometimes particularly for them who never know about homeopathy before. Basically, homeopathy is formed from the word “Homeo” and “pathy”. “Homeo” means similar or same, while “pathy” means pain. The base of this alternative medication is concentrates on the use of natural substances to stimulate the mind and the body in order to heal the diseases. For detail knowledge of terms of homeopathy, you might need to read the information below.

Glossary of Terms

In the terms of homeopathy, you’ll find aggravation. It is a name for an obvious enhancement in the symptoms of the disease. Then there’s also an antidote for a material or a remedy that neutralizes the effects of homeopathy medication. Dose that is recommended might be given an antidote to counteract the effect when the patient is not responding well to the homeopathy.

Tissue salts termed as cell salts and biochemic remedies are several of the most important terms of homeopathy. According to homeopaths, use twelve dissimilar salts are significant for the functioning of the body. These cell salts are prepared in low potency and used under homeopathic signs.

Symptoms that are general to a specific sickness or disease like yellow skin in jaundice are known as a common symptom. In terms of homeopathy, symptom of concomitant refers to the symptom that happens at the same time as the main complaint. Those symptoms that refer to location etiology, concomitants sensation and modalities all together give what is known as complete symptom.

Centesimal is one of the three effectiveness scales used in the homeopathy pharmacy. It’s the process of repeated dilutions and successions. In terms of homeopathy and its standards, it’s notated by 10 or 100 scales.

Taking one part of the medicinal substance, tincture or dry blended with alcohol or 99 parts of lactose, and shaken will result 1c potency. In the other hand, taking 1 part of this potency and mixing it with 99 parts of lactose or alcohol and then shaken will yield 2c. A 300c has gone through this process 300 times. A 1M has gone through the process 1000 times.

Furthermore, the decimal scale is the other potency scale in terms of homeopathy. This is a process of taking one part of the medicinal element and blending it with 9 parts of diluents, and shaken well determines a 1X (D) potency.

One part of this potency and 9 parts of diluents, then successes, yields 2X (D) potency. This continuous till the desired potency is reached. The third potency scale is the LM(50 millesimal, Q) conceived by Hahnemann. Effectiveness refers to the strength of homeopathic remedy in terms of homeopathy.

If you’re keen on implementing homeopathy into your life, you are recommended to comprehend the terms of homeopathy. By knowing the terms of homeopathy before implementing homeopathy into life, it will make you easier to gain its advantage.

Using Glutathione Therapy For Parkinsons Symptoms

Anyone living with Parkinson’s disease knows that there are good and bad days. For days when there are challenges, a new treatment, one that is relatively inexpensive, effective, and safe has been discovered.

Not only is this a safe solution for treating Parkinson’s disease, it is also highly effective. This means people with this disease have a fighting chance for normalcy. While it does not cure the disease, IV Glutathione therapy does slow down the progression.

In clinical trials, results show that up to 90% of participants using Glutathione therapy experience significant improvement. In the case of Parkinson’s, the brain’s dopamine receptors lose their sensitivity but with Glutathione, the receptors are restored to normal function.

With this form of treatment, dopamine within the brain is able to function more effectively. This means dopamine sensitivity is improved, as well as the brain’s serotonin levels that can help decrease levels of depression.

In most cases of Glutathione therapy and Parkinson’s, the patient is given 1,400 milligrams on a daily basis with saline. Using an IV drip for ten minutes, three times each week grants the medication to enter the bloodstream so it can get to work swiftly.

 

Although there’s oral Glutathione medication, IV Glutathione therapy is the only way in which Parkinson’s disease should be treated, making it much more effective. Depending on the physician providing the treatment, some will also add various drugs and herbs such as milk thistle and amino acids.

The advances seen over the years pertaining to IV Glutathione therapy are incredible. This allows Parkinson’s patients to get off medications such as Levodopa that have harsh side effects. Anyone interested in this treatment option should remain on any prescribed drugs and then speak to their doctor about eliminating them and switching over to Glutathione therapy.

There are so many wonderful benefits associated with IV Glutathione therapy but the number one is the elimination of side effects, something no patient wants to deal with. Not only do many of the traditional medications have side effects but some also come with serious health risk factors to include stroke and heart attack.

Although the cost of Glutathione therapy is a little higher than other options, it works exceptionally well. The good news is that most insurance companies are now providing partial or full coverage of this substance because it has been approved by the FDA.

Within a short time of a person with Parkinsons Symptoms being put on IV Glutathione therapy, they start to respond to the treatment. This means the patient starts to take back some control over his or her life. As you can imagine, both patients and medical professionals are anxious to get this treatment option out to the public. Although IV Glutathione therapy is used commonly to Parkinson’s, physicians are finding that it also helps with other health problems such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and so on.

If you’ve Parkinson’s disease or another illness mentioned and find that current treatment is not providing you with the needed relief, then Glutathione therapy could be the perfect solution. More and more, this treatment option is becoming accepted among medical professionals and it might be the exact treatment you need.