Why Gluten Free? Find Out What to Eat and What to Avoid

glutenfreeWhy gluten free? Getting started eating gluten-free may seem daunting. The typical American diet contains an overload of wheat, our main source of the problematic protein known as gluten. (The other sources are rye and barley.) But going gluten-free doesn’t have to be that difficult, doesn’t deprive you of wholesome, nutritious foods, and can be mastered with a little practice. Continue reading

Create a Safe Kitchen in a Non-Gluten-Free Home to Avoid Getting Sick

gluBeing gluten-free means more than just purchasing gluten-free ingredients and prepared meals. People, who live a gluten-free lifestyle, unless they live alone, are preparing their meals in a non-gluten-free environment. These people may experience symptoms that they thought they left behind when they switched to a gluten-free diet. The reason for these health concerns may be cross-contamination at home.

Contain gluten in the kitchen Continue reading

Avoid Toxic Ingredients and Create your own Mask with Calcium Bentonite Clay

Skin is the body`s largest organ and one of the primary ways toxins make their way into the body. Therefore, it`s important to read the labels of skin care products and learn what to avoid when it comes to ingredients. The marketplace is abundant with prepared “natural” clay masks. An alternative to buying packaged clay masks is to “do-it-yourself”.

In the United States, skin care products for human use require that ingredients be listed. However, the FDA does not require verifiable, mandatory compliance with the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act for cosmetic products (which include skin care products) before they are marketed. Let the buyer beware! Here are some important points to keep in mind with regard to reading skin care labels: Continue reading

Poison is in your Perfume

As lovely as your favorite fragrance may smell, there’s a good chance that it’s a toxic chemical concoction of poisons. The ingredients used to make perfume and cologne don’t stop at natural spices and pure essential oils (no matter what those romantic commercials on your TV may imply).

The list often includes formaldehyde, toluene, methylene chloride, benzaldehyde, petroleum, and phthalates. These chemicals have been linked to a wide range of damaging symptoms, including respiratory problems, nervous system issues, reproductive issues like infertility, and various forms of cancer. Phthalates are also known to be endocrine disruptors. These harmful effects have the most impact on young children Continue reading

MSG Large Contributor to Illnesses

Despite common perception, the toxic food additive MSG is everywhere – not just in Chinese food! This taste enhancer is actually hidden under dozens of ingredient names in all sorts of processed foods, restaurant foods, beverages, chewing gums, vitamins and supplements. It is added to foods in higher dosages than ever before, and more and more people are experiencing symptoms.

Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) is a health concern because it contains glutamate. Glutamate is the salt form of “Free Glutamic Acid” – a toxin that is associated with many health problems (http://www.msgmyth.com/symptoms.html). Due to insufficient labeling laws, food companies use many ingredients (http://www.msgmyth.com/hidden_names…) to disguise Free Glutamic Acid in their products, so consumers must look for more than just “MSG” on food labels. Continue reading

Food Dyes Linked to Hyperactivity in Some Children

Food dyes used in everything from candy to lunch meat may contribute to worsening hyperactivity in some kids, researchers told an FDA advisory panel on Wednesday.

The data are far from conclusive and scientists point out they don’t know how the possible effects might work. But the concerns have the FDA mulling new warnings on food packages to alert parents to the possible connection.

Over two days of hearings in Silver Spring, Md., expert advisors are listening to evidence and arguments on a possible connection between food dyes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Some studies have shown that hyperactive children can improve after food dyes are eliminated from their diet. Many other studies don’t show that. Even positive studies tend not to single out individual food dyes. Others only show improvement when parents are judging kids’ behavior, not when doctors or teachers do. Continue reading

Labels Database for Dietary Supplements

The Dietary Supplements Labels Database offers information about label ingredients in more than 4,000 selected brands of dietary supplements. It enables users to compare label ingredients in different brands. Information is also provided on the “structure/function” claims made by manufacturers. These claims by manufacturers have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Companies may not market as dietary supplements any products that are intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Ingredients of dietary supplements in this database are linked to other National Library of Medicine databases such as MedlinePlus® and PubMed® to allow users to understand the characteristics of ingredients and view the results of research pertaining to them, including the following characteristics:

* Uses in humans

* Adverse effects

* Mechanism of action

The Database can be searched by brand names, uses noted on product labels, specific active ingredients, and manufacturers.

http://dietarysupplements.nlm.nih.gov/dietary/