New Scientific Analysis Confirms Saturated Fats Have No Link to Heart Disease

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For decades, saturated fat has been wrongfully blamed for causing heart disease, but over 70 published studies overwhelmingly dispute this

A recent meta-analysis again found no association between high levels of saturated fat in the diet and heart disease, Continue reading

Fermented Foods

My education about cultured and fermented foods was for many years the same as everybody else.  I heard the commercials touting the benefits of eating yogurt and heard about the need for acidophilus.  It wasn’t until I started exploring the idea of fermenting foods that I really understood how beneficial they can be.  Growing up I can remember my mother slicing up cabbage and packing it in a huge crock Continue reading

Boost Your Immune System with Zinc

zincDid you know that more than 300 unique enzymes need zinc to work effectively? Zinc is found in each cell of your body. It is involved directly in nearly every single bodily process that you can think of.

But that’s not all that makes zinc an amazing mineral. Zinc also has the power to boost your immune system in a special way. Continue reading

Four Ways to Make Meat Healthier

When stressing  the importance of a balanced diet filled with nutrient-dense healing foods, meat quite often,  does not fall into these categories, but of course meat is a huge part of American cuisine. So here we present some tips, courtesy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, about how to ensure you stay healthy with your meat consumption. Continue reading

The Lifestyle Villains that Trigger Headaches

To many headache sufferers, headaches seem an inevitable part of life. In fact, you can take preventive measures to reduce your pain or completely escape it. But first you have to recognize what is bringing on those debilitating aches.

A Self-induced Problem

Millions of headaches strike Americans each and every year. As a matter of fact, hundreds of thousands of headaches pound inside the heads of people daily. Most of these episodes are completely preventable and are caused by the choices each headache sufferer makes. Yes, I am saying that we create, cause and trigger our own headaches. And because of that simple truth, you can stop doing what you are doing and prevent your headaches from ever coming back. That’s a fact.

Serious biological conditions that cause headaches, such as meningitis and tumors for example, are rare. Only about 12 percent of all headaches are caused by them, and those are confined to a very small proportion of people with those diseases. Headaches caused by physical trauma, such as a fall or impact, are not typical and also not thought of and treated in the general way other organic headaches are. So, if we remove serious disease and physical trauma from the headache equation, then we are left with 80 percent of headaches being self-induced.

Accountability Continue reading

This Acid Is Great for Your Heart

Taurine isn’t one of those minerals that get the spotlight in health news. It’s usually passed over in favor of other, better-known amino acids like homocysteine or tryptophan. But taurine has an important job to do when it comes to the proper functioning of your body. High concentrations of this amino acid are found in your heart muscle, skeletal muscle, nervous system and white blood cells.

Researchers at the Institute for World Health Development in Nishinomiya, Japan, investigated taurine for a possible beneficial role in the prevention of stroke and cardiovascular disease. For their study, which was coordinated by the World Health Organization, the research team reviewed surveys pertaining to diet in 61 different Japanese populations. In particular, they collected data related to cardiovascular disease risk and mortality.

They found that participants Continue reading

New study – Whole Food Vegetarian Diets Reverse and Eliminate Many Serious Illnesses

A new study found that plant based diets are a fundamental solution to our public health crisis, especially with some of the most serious and debilitating illnesses. The physicians at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute found that the frequency and the cost of many illnesses, including obesity, cancer, diabetes, and heart disease, can be considerably reduced just by switching to a whole food, nutrient dense, plant-based diet that doesn’t include meat or dairy. Sometimes, the diseases were reversed just with these diet changes too.

Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, who led the study, said: “We are potentially on the cusp Continue reading

The Invasion of Chemicals in Vitamins and Supplements

The general public is still shopping at Walmart and common drugstores for synthetic multivitamins and calcium supplements. The bad news is what you don’t know might hurt you.

Walking into a nutritional nightmare is easy if you don’t know about supplements. Dangerous supplement’s can reverse what you are trying to accomplish. If you pick a cheap poison off the corporate shelves, you’re actually making things worse. Stop focusing on RDA percentages, and take a quick read of “other ingredients.”

This is where one finds mind-blowing additives which are used to bind everything together, making your liver and kidneys toxic. The hit list includes synthetic sugars, talc, dyes, sodium benzoate, methylcellulose, carnauba wax, silicon or titanium dioxide, Continue reading

The Burger of the Future Is Made from Stem Cells

The first ‘test-tube’ hamburger is only a year away, scientists claim.

They believe the product, beef mince grown from stem cells, could pave the way for eating meat without animals being slaughtered.

The Dutch scientists predict that over the next few decades the world’s population will increase so quickly that there will not be enough livestock to feed everyone.

As a result, they say, laboratory-grown beef, chicken and lamb could become normal.

The scientists are currently developing a burger Continue reading

Pregnant Women Need to Test for Vitamin D Levels say Researchers

Australian clinical researchers have identified widespread Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women as well as a very strong association between low Vitamin D levels and gestational diabetes.

In a retrospective study of 147 women from a gestational diabetes clinic at Westmead Hospital, 41% were shown to be Vitamin D deficient.

Not only that, the lower the Vitamin D, the worse the women’s blood sugar control – measured through a test known as the ‘HbA1c’, which averages blood sugar levels over the preceding two months. Continue reading

10 Scary Things that Might be in Your Meat

College marks a new and exciting time in a person’s life. As a new student entering the world of higher education, you will learn to expand your mind in classes and subjects you have never before studied. While college marks a new chapter for one’s educational and professional life, it can also prompt changes in one’s personal life. You will likely be living on your own for the first time and preparing your own food each day. While cooking may be the least of your worries as you toil through the challenges of your freshman year, it is important to educate yourself on some of the dangers cooking your own food can pose if done incorrectly. As you explore the exciting world of culinary arts, be sure to handle and cook meat properly, so as to better avoid any food borne illnesses.  Continue reading

What is Food Poisoning?

Food poisoning is an illness caused by eating foods that have harmful organisms in them. These harmful germs can include bacteria, parasites, and viruses. They are mostly found in raw meat, chicken, fish, and eggs, but they can spread to any type of food. They can also grow on food that is left out on counters or outdoors or is stored too long before you eat it. Sometimes food poisoning happens when people do not wash their hands before they touch food.

Most of the time, food poisoning is mild and goes away after a few days. All you can do is wait for your body to get rid of the germ that is causing the illness. But some types of food poisoning may be more serious, and you may need to see a doctor.

What are the symptoms?

The first symptom of food poisoning is usually diarrhea. You may also feel sick to your stomach, vomit, or have stomach cramps. How you feel when you have food poisoning mostly depends on how healthy you are and what germ is making you sick.

If you vomit or have diarrhea a lot, you can get dehydrated. Dehydration means that your body has lost too much fluid. Watch for signs of dehydration, which include having a dry mouth, feeling lightheaded, and passing only a little dark urine. Children and the elderly can get dehydrated very quickly and should be watched closely. Pregnant women should always call a doctor if they think they may have food poisoning.

How do harmful germs get into food?

Germs can get into food when:

  • Meat is processed. It is normal to find bacteria in the intestines of healthy animals that we use for food. Sometimes the bacteria get mixed up with the parts of those animals that we eat.
  • The food is watered or washed. If the water used to irrigate or wash fresh fruits and vegetables has germs from animal manure or human sewage in it, those germs can get on the fruits and vegetables.
  • The food is prepared. When someone who has germs on his or her hands touches the food, or if the food touches other food that has germs on it, the germs can spread. For example, if you use the same cutting board for chopping vegetables and preparing raw meat, germs from the raw meat can get on the vegetables.

How will you know if you have food poisoning?

Because most food poisoning is mild and goes away after a few days, most people do not go to the doctor. You can usually assume that you have food poisoning if other people who ate the same food also got sick.

If you think you have food poisoning, call your local health department to report it. This could help keep others from getting sick.

Call your doctor if you think you may have a serious illness. If your diarrhea or vomiting is very bad or if you do not start to get better after a few days, you may need to see your doctor.

If you do go to the doctor, he or she will ask you about your symptoms (diarrhea, feeling sick to your stomach, or throwing up), ask about your health in general, and do a physical exam. Your doctor will ask about where you have been eating and whether anyone who ate the same foods is also sick. Sometimes the doctor will take stool or blood samples and have them tested.

How is it treated?

In most cases, food poisoning goes away on its own in 2 to 3 days. All you need to do is rest and get plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration. Drink a cup of water or rehydration drink (such as Lytren, Pedialyte, or Rehydralyte) each time you have a large, loose stool. You can also use a sports drink, such as Gatorade. Soda and fruit juices have too much sugar and should not be used to rehydrate. Doctors recommend trying to eat normally as soon as possible. When you can eat without vomiting, try to eat the kind of foods you usually do. But try to stay away from foods that are high in fat or sugar.

Antibiotics are usually not used to treat food poisoning. Medicines that stop diarrhea (antidiarrheals) can be helpful, but they should not be given to infants or young children.

If you think you are severely dehydrated, you may need to go to the hospital. And in some severe cases, such as for botulism or E. coli infection, you may need medical care right away.

How can you prevent food poisoning?

You can prevent most cases of food poisoning with these simple steps:

  • Clean. Wash your hands often and always before you touch food. Keep your knives, cutting boards, and counters clean. You can wash them with hot, soapy water, or put items in the dishwasher and use a disinfectant on your counter. Wash fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Separate. Keep germs from raw meat from getting on fruits, vegetables, and other foods. Put cooked meat on a clean platter, not back on the one that held the raw meat.
  • Cook. Make sure that meat, chicken, fish, and eggs are fully cooked.
  • Chill. Refrigerate leftovers right away. Don’t leave cut fruits and vegetables at room temperature for a long time.
  • When in doubt, throw it out. If you are not sure if a food is safe, don’t eat it.

Meat Linked to Prostate Cancer

MIAMI – Eating large amounts of red and processed meats may be linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer, researchers report in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

The authors followed 175,343 men in the United States who were 50-71 years old from 1995 until 2003. They recorded the participants’ meat consumption, including the type of meat they ate and how they cooked it, and monitored their iron levels, nitrite/nitrate intake and the number of prostate cancer diagnoses.

By the end of the study, 10,313 developed prostate cancer, of which 419 died.

After adjusting for various factors known to increase the risk of prostate cancer, the authors found that men who ate the most red meat were 12 percent more likely to develop prostate cancer and 33 percent more likely to develop advanced prostate cancer than those who ate the least amount.

Processed meat was also linked to a higher risk of prostate cancer. However, the authors noted that red processed meats (like hot dogs and bacon) were linked to a greater cancer risk than white processed meats (like turkey sandwich meat).

Grilling was the only cooking method that was linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer. It has been suggested that cancer risk may be increased by compounds called heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are formed when meat (especially red meat) is cooked at high temperatures. When heated, the amino acids, sugars and creatinine are converted into HCAs and PAHs, which have been linked to various cancers, including stomach, colorectal, pancreatic and breast cancers, in humans.

Nitrate intake was also correlated with an increased risk of the disease. Nitrates are preservatives that are added to processed and cured meats such as cold cuts and bacon. The preservatives have been associated with cancer-causing chemicals called nitrosamines.

This study supports growing evidence that too much meat may be unhealthy. Earlier studies suggest that red or processed meat may increase the risk of colon cancer and death (particularly from cancer and heart disease) and may be linked to age-related macular degeneration. Red meat also contains high amounts of saturated fats, which have been shown to increase the risk of heart disease.

Some other dietary changes may help reduce the risk of prostate cancer. For instance, eating fewer dairy products that are high in fat (like ice cream, cheese and sour cream) may be beneficial. Also, cruciferous vegetables (such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower) have been reported to contain cancer-fighting phytochemicals that may decrease the chances of developing prostate cancer.

The American Urological Association (AUA) encourages men who are in good health to have annual PSA testing starting at age 50, or at age 40 if they are in high-risk groups, such as African American men or those with histories of the disease.