13 Evidence-Based Medicinal Properties of Coconut Oil

13 Evidence-Based Medicinal Properties of Coconut OilWhile coconut oil has dragged itself out of the muck of vast misrepresentation over the past few years, it still rarely gets the appreciation it truly deserves.  Not just a “good” saturated fat, coconut oil is an exceptional healing agent as well, with loads of useful health applications. Continue reading

9 Evidence-Based Medicinal Properties of Oranges

medicinal_properties_of_oranges(1)The orange is both a literal and symbolic embodiment of the sun, from whose light it is formed. As a whole food it irradiates us with a spectrum of healing properties, the most prominent of which some call “vitamin C activity,” but which is not reducible to the chemical skeleton known as ‘ascorbic acid.’ Science now confirms the orange Continue reading

Science Confirms Turmeric As Effective As 14 Drugs

tumeric altTurmeric is one the most thoroughly researched plants in existence today.  Its medicinal properties and components (primarily curcumin) have been the subject of over 5600 peer-reviewed and published biomedical studies.  In fact, our five-year long research project on this sacred plant has revealed over 600 potential preventive Continue reading

Chaga Mushroom

chagaDid You Know…

… that chaga mushroom can strengthen the immune system, help prevent cancer, reduce high blood pressure, and soothe an aching stomach?

The Siberians call this humble tree fungus a “Gift of God” and the “Mushroom of Immortality.” The Japanese have nicknamed it “The Diamond of the Forest.” The Chinese refer to it as “King of the Plants.” And thousands of centuries of use attest to this mushroom’s healing and strengthening properties. Continue reading

How This “Miracle Tree” Can Prevent Cancer and Stop Tumor Growth

moringaDid You Know…

… that the superfood known as moringa contains several thousand times more of the powerful anti-aging nutrient zeatin than any other known plant—and that it also has 2 compounds that prevent cancer and stop tumor growth?

The moringa is a genus of trees indigenous to Southern India and Northern Africa. It is a short, slender, deciduous, perennial tree that grows about 30 feet tall.  Once grown only in India, Continue reading

More than 101 Reasons to Use Coconut as a Home Remedy to Improve your Health Naturally

Coconuts are a versatile super food providing nutrition, health benefits, and amazing medicinal properties all wrapped in one delicious package. Coconuts are totally natural, easily available and affordable; and every part of the fruit is useful.

Green coconut water uses:

–Natural, healthy source for hydration, energy and endurance, Continue reading

Discover the Many Uses of Mullein

Mullein, a plant that grows in dry, barren places, has been used for centuries because of its outstanding medicinal qualities. Its healing properties are found in its roots, leaves, and flowers, and it has been effective in treating a variety of health conditions, especially respiratory disorders.

Native Americans used the leaves of the mullein plant to ease respiratory discomfort. Mullein tea is also an effective way of treating respiratory and other types of conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and allergies. It is also effective in treating sore throats and coughs.

Mullein’s anti-bacterial properties make it effective in treating infections. It has even been used to treat tuberculosis as it inhibits mycobacterium, the bacteria, which causes the disease.

Last year, in an article listed in PubMed titled “What’s in a Name? Can Mullein Weed Beat TB where Modern Drugs are Failing” authors Eibhlin McCarthy and Jim M. O’Mahony of the Cork Institute of Technology in Ireland reported:

“Extracts of the mullein leaf have also been shown in laboratory studies to possess antitumor, antiviral, antifungal, and – most interestingly for the purpose of this paper – antibacterial properties.”

The authors also observed that mullein had been shown in trials Continue reading

Testimonies Document the Medicinal Properties of Cannabis and its Derivatives

Local research, testimonies document the medicinal properties of cannabis and its derivatives

Montana Kaimin

Deni Llovet, a family nurse practitioner, organized River City Family Health’s first medical marijuana clinic after a patient with chronic back pain committed suicide.

“Two and a half years ago, I had a client who was really suffering,” Llovet said. “We had tried everything and finally I said, ‘You know, I hear that marijuana could help.’”
When the patient asked if it was legal, Llovet said no. She did not know about the state’s exemption.

“She bought cannabis from her 27-year-old son and it worked wonders,” Llovet said. “But her family did not approve, so she killed herself because her pain was so great.

“I should have known it was legal. That’s when I realized that I was missing the beat.”

Nearly 700 medical studies of cannabis and its derivatives are published each year that confirm their useful medical properties, said Tom Daubert, who led the campaign to establish the Montana law and later founded the patient support group Patients and Families United.

In 2002, adjunct University of Montana professor and local neurologist Dr. Ethan Russo researched the long-term effects, positive and negative, of smoking marijuana as a medical treatment.

Russo’s team, which included a UM grad student, evaluated four remaining members of the FDA’s Compassionate Investigational New Drug program. Though the program no longer accepts new patients, the remaining four are provided with four to eight ounces of government-grown, cured marijuana each week as treatment for serious illnesses such as glaucoma and multiple sclerosis.

“The Missoula Study,” as it was nicknamed, concluded the medical use of marijuana relieved pain, muscle spasms and intra-eye pressure. The researchers recommended that the program be reopened or that states develop laws to accommodate patients in serious need.

“While some 13 American states allow medicinal use of cannabis for
 certain conditions, it remains illegal under federal law,” Russo said. “One possible
 solution to this situation would be FDA approval of a cannabis-based 
medicine so that it could be prescribed. Because of the side effects of smoking and variability in herbal
 cannabis without standardization, it is extremely unlikely that it could
 attain FDA approval.”

Most recent research delves into the relationship of phytocannabinoids found in marijuana plants, such as THC, and endocannabinoids, their counterparts produced in the human body. When a medical marijuana patient takes a dose, most of the phytocannabinoids engage with cells of the nervous system in conjunction with the endocannabinoids already present to produce a variety of effects, including pain relief.

Russo continued to research and synthesize these cannabinoids as senior medical adviser for GW Pharmaceuticals to help develop a cannabis-based oral spray. The product, called Sativex, is approved in Canada to treat cancer pain and multiple sclerosis.

But until it is approved in the U.S. or the cost of similar cannabis-derivatives decreases, physicians such as Llovet say they will continue to recommend the leafier medical counterpart.

Llovet said she prefers to recommend marijuana over opiate painkillers because it does not have the side effects, physical addictions or overdoses commonly seen among patients prescribed morphine or Oxycontin, for example.

“If you wanted to kill yourself with cannabis, you would have to smother yourself under bales of it,” Llovet said. “Overdose is easy with prescription pain killers.”
Using medical marijuana or its pharmaceutical derivatives in conjunction with other painkillers can provide superior relief and reduce the risk of developing a tolerance to opiate prescriptions, Russo said.

Sitting at Food For Thought, Llovet was wrapped up in her excitement. Her coffee grew cold as she talked about the clinics where she works with others to identify the best treatments, sometimes including medical marijuana.

Contrary to what she expected, Llovet said the clinics don’t see recreational users looking for a loophole.

“We see the little old ladies, the old man living out in the woods and once we went out to a car to help a quadriplegic. We are seeing people who haven’t seen a health care practitioner in 30 years,” Llovet said. “We really are providing a public service. Our job is to make sure they really do qualify, and we want to give them suggestions on how to improve their health, whether that includes medical marijuana or not.”

At River City Family Health, visiting the clinic costs $200 for the patient, who must also register for an appointment and submit medical records in advance, though qualifying individuals without records are also allowed to attend.

When a prospective patient arrives at the clinic, a nurse gives him a physical before passing the chart to Llovet, who speaks with each individual for at least 15 minutes about his medical history and suggests all possible treatments. The person and chart then move to the final stage for a consultation with Dr. Michael Geci, who may sign a physician’s recommendation for medical marijuana if he believes the patient legally qualifies and the treatment seems appropriate.

After receiving a physician’s recommendation, the person applies for a patient registry card with the state Department of Public Health and Human Services and can designate one person as a caregiver. Each patient is allowed to grow six plants for their medicine and possess one ounce of usable marijuana, and if they name a caregiver, that person can tend six plants and hold one ounce for each patient they assist.

“We are not affiliated with caregivers,” Llovet said. “We do recommend you enter into a relationship with a caregiver you trust.”

Daubert said many people designate a spouse or close friend as a caregiver, but often it is difficult initially because most people do not have experience growing cannabis.

“These are the only patients in the world growing their own medicine,” Daubert said. “Contrary to what a lot of people think, growing medical marijuana is not so simple. It takes months to grow a plant.”

In February, Daubert led a group of patients, caregivers, and activists to the state capitol, where they sought to improve the law’s functionality through Senate Bill No. 326, which died in a House committee after passing Senate.

“The House legislature was evenly divided (between parties) and a lot of bills couldn’t make it out of committee,” Daubert said. “It’s some part political fluke and partly because it was brand new information to many of the representatives. We got more support than I’d expected, however.”

The bill, created by Daubert and other PFU associates, sought to expand the law’s list of qualifying illnesses, allowing patients to obtain medicine from any registered caregiver, establish inventory audits under certain conditions, increase the amount of medical marijuana a patient and caregiver can possess and alter the definition of a mature plant to make it easier for patients to maintain a steady flow of medicine.

“We’ve likened our law to being allowed to have six tomato plants, but only one tomato and needing one in the fridge tomorrow to guarantee your medicine,” Daubert said. “Let me see you grow the plants and follow that rule. That’s what we are asking them to do.”

And for people who choose not to grow themselves, or who need larger amounts for relief, they rely on their caregivers to provide consistently as they, too, abide by the tomato rule.

Sometimes, an even flow of medicine cannot be maintained for other reasons.