Booming New Cannabis Industry Faces an Abundance of Hurdles

canaStory at-a-glance −

Many new state laws conflict with federal drug laws when it comes to pot, which creates problems for the industry and its consumers

 If you live in a state where marijuana is legal, Continue reading

Harvard Research Links Fluoridated Water to ADHD, Mental Disorders

water2A leading cause of ADHD (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder) and autism in children could be the hidden chemicals lurking in the foods we eat, the water we drink and the products we consume, says a new study recently published in The Lancet. Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS) found that, Continue reading

Say Goodbye to Gluten: Over 200 Clinically Confirmed Reasons to Avoid Wheat

gluten This title is the same as a recent GreenMedInfo.com. It contains a list of over 200 health problems, with celiac disease at the top and including many more not normally associated with gluten intolerance.

The author and founder of GreenMedInfo.com, Sayer Ji, Continue reading

Psychiatric Diagnoses: Why No One Is Satisfied

As the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is revised for the first time since 1994, controversy about psychiatric diagnosis is reaching a fever pitch.

Suggested changes to the definitions of autism spectrum disorders and depression, among others, are eliciting great concerns. However, there are larger concerns about the DSM as a whole.

“Almost no one likes the DSM, but no one knows what to do about it,” said University of Michigan psychiatrist Randolph Nesse.

The current round of revisions is the fifth since the DSM was originally published by the American Psychiatric Association in 1952. Continue reading

Europe’s Largest Health Challenge This Century

A new study, landmark in nature, paints a stark picture across the ocean of Europe’s mental and neurological health. Its findings have definite relevance to North America. Researchers have revealed the European continent’s biggest health challenge of the 21st century: battling mental disorders.

Conditions of the brain have become the most pressing concern in Europe. The study also highlights that most mental disorders remain untreated. It is a remarkable burden. The three-year study covered 30 countries, spanning 514 million people. All major mental disorders for children through the elderly were included, as well as several neurological disorders. It is an unprecedented scope.

The study’s key findings were: Continue reading

Mental Disorders in Children are the Result of Vitamin D Deficiencies

A new study shows that children with psychosis and other severe mental health disorders also have twice as much vitamin D deficiency as children who are mentally healthy.

The study, presented to the American Psychiatric Association 2011 Annual Meeting in Honolulu in June by researchers from the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland showed that 21 percent of children with symptoms of severe psychiatric problems had vitamin D levels below what the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends.

That level compared with 14 percent of children who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, a population-based study Continue reading

Psych Drug Doctors pushing to implement Lithium in Drinking Water

Chlorine, fluoride, and the various other chemical poisons already added to the nation’s drinking water supplies are apparently not enough for the self-appointed experts whose insatiable lust to force-medicate the world is never satisfied. A recent report in The Daily offers credence to the insane notion that adding lithium, a drug currently used to treat mental disorders, to drinking water will be beneficial in helping to reduce suicide and violent crime rates.

Much like fluoride, lithium alters the brain’s normal production of serotonin and norepinephrine, which in turn artificially alters the way an individual, thinks and how he or she feels about a given situation. Lithium is literally a mind-altering, antidepressant chemical substance that those promoting it openly admit modifies brain function. And yet they purport that forcibly inducing these chemical changes on the unwitting populations of the world is a good and acceptable idea. Continue reading

Using Robots and Computer Vision To Diagnose Mental Disorders in Children

A University of Minnesota research team was recently awarded two grants totaling more than $3 million from the National Science Foundation’s Cyber-Enabled Discovery and MRI Programs to create robotic devices and computer vision algorithms that will assist with the early diagnosis of children at risk of developing disorders such as autism, attention deficit disorder (ADD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

The team led by computer science and engineering professor Nikolaos Papanikolopoulos in the University’s College of Science and Engineering, is developing robotic instruments that could observe and automatically analyze abnormalities in children’s movements and behaviors. Researchers have been using the Xbox Kinect to track the subjects, but in the future the technology could be expanded. By using novel robots, such as robot pets and robotic sandboxes, equipped with specialized detectors and software, the researchers will analyze the probability of abnormalities based on facial expressions and body positions.

“Researchers and scientists believe that psychiatric disorders display subtle physical abnormalities in childhood well before the onset of a full disorder,” said Papanikolopoulos. “We believe that we can use new computational tools, including computer vision and robotics, with a unique new computer vision algorithm to observe and detect abnormalities in motor and emotion in children to automatically analyze them for abnormalities.”

Traditionally, experts have conducted psychiatric assessments using a visual rating system after watching videos of the subjects’ motor movements and facial emotional expressions. Those expert ratings are subjective, and are limited to the observer’s particular expertise. In addition, the method is costly.

This cross-disciplinary research seeks to create a diagnostic instrument for mental disorders that combines the fields of computer vision/robotics and computer science with child psychology and psychiatry.

Using these new tools, the research team members hope to be able to create more effective tools for detecting at-risk children at an earlier age. Ultimately, they hope to create a diagnostic framework, including workshops and tutorials, as well as demonstrations to distribute their work and make it more widely available.