The Links between Your Diet and Hormone Levels, and How Estrogen May Protect You Against Dementia

bio2Story at-a-glance 

Your hormones have far-reaching effects in your body, and hormone deficiencies can therefore wreak total havoc on your health Continue reading

Methylwho? Why You Should Know About Methylation

methylI was giving a lecture to a group of psychiatric fellows recently, and I got to my slide on folate.  I get excited about this topic, and so I rambled on about the one-carbon cycle, and SAMe, methylcobalamin, and the MTHFR mutation.  As I looked away from my slides, I could see the vacant stares from the near-audience and knew I had lost them.  If highly educated and Continue reading

Favorite Fruits Win the Battle against Fatigue

quercetinThe weather is warming, the flowers are in bloom, and I hope you’re taking full advantage! Spring is a wonderful time to enjoy your favorite activities, like gardening, golf, or just reading on the porch with your grandkids.

But if you’re spending Continue reading

The Sitting Sickness: Is It Silently Killing You?

sitting_illnessThe Sitting Sickness

If you’ve heard that life is movement, it’s true.  If you’ve heard that just sitting around can kill you, it’s also true.  Physical inactivity is the fourth leading cause of death worldwide![1] You may have heard the media reporting recently on several studies showing that Continue reading

Vitamin K2: New Hope for Parkinson’s Patients?

Neuroscientist Patrik Verstreken, associated with VIB and KU Leuven, succeeded in undoing the effect of one of the genetic defects that leads to Parkinson’s using vitamin K2. Continue reading

For Better Muscles: Eat Spinach, Skip the Mouthwash

SPINACHMitochondria, tiny cell structures that power our muscles, can develop leaks that hurt muscle performance. Research shows, however, that substances found in spinach can stop these leaks and make mitochondria mightier. But to get the full effect, you may have to ditch your mouthwash. Strong mouthwashes kill off the oral bacteria that enable the body to put spinach’s Continue reading

Aspartame Withdrawal and Side Effects Explained – Here’s How to Protect Yourself

If you have been drinking diet soda and chewing gum, chances are you have been enjoying aspartame in generous quantities. Aspartame is a popular sugar substitute that can be found in diet soda drinks, chewing gum, fruit spreads and sugar-free products to name a few. It is also known by the brand names, Sweet One, NutraSweet and Spoonful. Despite its popularity in the market, what many do not know is that aspartame accounts for 75 percent of side effect complaints received by the Adverse Reaction Monitoring System (ARMS) of the US Food and Drug Administration.

Can aspartame be addictive?

Yes, according to Dr. Betty Martini, popular anti-aspartame advocate. She explains that it is an “addictive, exitoneurotic, carcinogenic, genetically engineered drug and adjuvant that damages the mitochondria.” Moreover, Dr. Janet Hall, another famous advocate against aspartame, shares on her website that all artificial sweeteners create an artificial need for more sweetness. She goes on to add that forced sweetness, being a class of altered food, is a trap that cause people to become addicted to sweeter tasting food with no nutritional value.

Recent studies have shown that aspartame is addictive because Continue reading

The Little-Known Secrets of Vitamin C

Here I present a multi-part look at one of the most well- known nutrients in the world: vitamin C. But do you know where it came from? Do you know (other than oranges) where to get it in food? Do you know what it does? Read on.

The year was 1753. The doctor was a British naval physician by the name of Lind, who found that there was something in citrus fruits that cured scurvy. Scurvy was a common disease among sailors when they were at sea due to the lack of fresh fruits and vegetables in the diet. Lind recommended that every sailor at sea should receive a daily ration of lime or lemon juice to overcome vitamin-C (ascorbic acid) deficiency. Fast forward to today, and you’ll find that vitamin C is the most popular vitamin supplement in the world. Continue reading

A Relaxing Way to Fight Inflammation

Need an excuse to get a massage? A new health breakthrough in the area of natural health news has proven that this alternative therapy could reduce inflammation in the body. Since inflammation is implicated in a wide swath of chronic diseases, it seems that seeing a massage therapist might not be just about stress relief.

On a cellular level, massage lessens inflammation and promotes the growth of new mitochondria in skeletal muscle. Mitochondria are the energy center of every cell in the body. The research appears online in the journal “Science Translational Medicine.”

The study involved the analysis of muscle biopsies taken from the quadriceps of 11 young men who had exercised vigorously on a stationary bicycle. One of each participant’s legs was randomly chosen to be massaged. Biopsies were taken from both legs prior to the exercise, immediately after 10 minutes of massage treatment and after a 2.5-hour period of recovery. Continue reading

Garlic Oil May Protect the Heart

Garlic oil may be used to release natural chemicals that protect heart tissue after a heart attack, during heart surgery or as part of the treatment for heart failure. Scientists at the Emory University School of Medicine have found that a component of garlic oil, called diallyl trisulfide, may be a safe and effective tool for limiting cardiac damage.

Lab studies at Emory indicated that diallyl trisulfide limited heart damage by more than 60 percent.

“Interruption of oxygen and blood flow damages mitochondria, and loss of mitochondrial integrity can lead to cell death,” said researcher Benjamin Predmore, Ph.D. “We see that diallyl sulfide can temporarily turn down the function of mitochondria, preserving them and lowering the production of reactive oxygen species.”

Additionally, the study authors noted that treatment with the garlic compound twice daily following heart failure helped prevent enlargement of the muscle.

Source for Story: Continue reading

Kombucha Tea Could Fight Cell Death

Kombucha tea is a little different from regular tea. It’s a special concoction made from tea, sugar, bacteria and yeast. This drink is sometimes called kombucha mushroom tea. Kombucha isn’t actually a mushroom though — it’s a colony of bacteria and yeast. Kombucha tea is made by adding this colony of bacteria and yeast to sugar and tea, and allowing the mix to ferment. The tea contains vinegar, B vitamins and a host of other chemical compounds.

There have been many health benefits attributed to Kombucha tea, but little scientific evidence to back up these claims. It might be worthwhile, therefore, to take a look at the results of a new clinical trial that verifies at least one health benefit associated with the fermented drink: improved liver health.

Researchers at the Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology in Jadavpur University, India, investigated the antioxidant property of kombucha tea. Specifically, the researchers wanted to know how kombucha tea would perform when pitted against cytotoxicity induced by tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) in mice liver cells. TBPH is organic peroxide that causes oxidative stress resulting in organ disease.

The researchers found that exposure to TBHP  Continue reading

Riboflavin and Feverfew Target Migraines

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)

Mitochondria, the powerhouse inside the cell, generate high-energy chemicals. In between migraine attacks, this important function is much reduced. Riboflavin has been shown to be beneficial in the prevention of migraine attacks to help affect this specific action. Here are three clinical studies worth taking a look at:

1. Fifty-five migraine patients received either 400 mg of riboflavin or placebo for three months. Riboflavin treatment was much better than placebo treatment in reducing the frequency of attacks and the number of headache days (59% in riboflavin vs. 15% in placebo).

2. Twenty-six migraine patients  Continue reading

Introducing – Aceytl-L-Carnitine

Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) is an ester of the trimethylated amino acid, L-carnitine, and is synthesized in the brain, liver and kidney by a specific enzyme carnitine acetyltransferase, which declines with age in animals. ALC facilitates the uptake of acetyl-groups into the mitochondria during fatty acid oxidation, enhances acetylcholine production and stimulates protein and membrane phospholipid synthesis. ALC is actively transported across the blood-brain barrier. It influences the cholinergic system as a cholinergic receptor agonist (facilitator) and may also promote synthesis and release of acetylcholine. More generally, ALC participates in cellular energy production and in maintenance and repair processes in neurons.

ALC aids in the transport of substances across the membrane of mitochondria, thereby participating in the production of energy within the brain.  ALC reverses the age-related decline in the number of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors on the neuron membrane. ALC elevates the levels of neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF). The neurotrophins are a family of structurally related proteins that function during development to guide the differentiation and growth of neurons. They also participate in the maintenance of adult neurons and are important in the repair of damage.

ALC reduces deficits in brain energy metabolism and phospholipid metabolism in rats by aiding mitochondrial function. ALC improves nerve regeneration in rats and protects neurons from the toxicity of mitochondrial uncouplers or inhibitors. Feeding senescent rats with ALC restores levels of this metabolite to those found in tissues of young rats. Treatment of these rats with ALC restores cardiolipin in mitochondrial membranes to levels which are found in younger rats. Cardiolipin (diphosphatidylglycerol) is a phospholipid which is biosynthesized and concentrated almost exclusively in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It is the only cardiolipid whose levels are found to be reduced in the mitochondria of older rats. Maximal activity of cytochrome c oxidase, necessary for cellular energetics, appears to depend upon cardiolipin levels. Clinical trials with ALC showed some improvements in cognitive function and improvement in memory, visuospatial capacity, vocabulary recall, cooperation, sociability and attention.

Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) is an ester of the trimethylated amino acid, L-carnitine, and is synthesized in the brain, liver and kidney by a specific enzyme carnitine acetyltransferase, which declines with age in animals. ALC facilitates the uptake of acetyl-groups into the mitochondria during fatty acid oxidation, enhances acetylcholine production and stimulates protein and membrane phospholipid synthesis. ALC is actively transported across the blood-brain barrier. It influences the cholinergic system as a cholinergic receptor agonist (facilitator) and may also promote synthesis and release of acetylcholine. More generally, ALC participates in cellular energy production and in maintenance and repair processes in neurons.

ALC aids in the transport of substances across the membrane of mitochondria, thereby participating in the production of energy within the brain. ALC reverses the age-related decline in the number of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors on the neuron membrane. ALC elevates the levels of neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF). The neurotrophins are a family of structurally related proteins that function during development to guide the differentiation and growth of neurons. They also participate in the maintenance of adult neurons and are important in the repair of damage.ALC reduces deficits in brain energy metabolism and phospholipid metabolism in rats by aiding mitochondrial function. ALC improves nerve regeneration in rats and protects neurons from the toxicity of mitochondrial uncouplers or inhibitors. Feeding senescent rats with ALC restores levels of this metabolite to those found in tissues of young rats. Treatment of these rats with ALC restores cardiolipin in mitochondrial membranes to levels which are found in younger rats. Cardiolipin (diphosphatidylglycerol) is a phospholipid which is biosynthesized and concentrated almost exclusively in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It is the only cardiolipid whose levels are found to be reduced in the mitochondria of older rats. Maximal activity of cytochrome c oxidase, necessary for cellular energetics, appears to depend upon cardiolipin levels. Clinical trials with ALC showed some improvements in cognitive function and improvement in memory, visuospatial capacity, vocabulary recall, cooperation, sociability and attention.

Iron Accumulation in a Cell Can Cause Disease

SYDNEY – The build-up of iron in a cell centre may lead to debilitating diseases which can cause brain and cardiac disorders, a study has revealed.

The accumulation of iron in mitochondria, which is the centre for cell respiration and energy production, is toxic. The iron can substantially damage the cell and cause death.

Using a mouse model, University of Sydney (U-S) researchers found that the iron loading was caused by its increased iron uptake and decreased release due to reduced iron utilization in two major mitochondrial pathways.

“The terrible part is that these children (with high iron accumulation in cells) grow up knowing the joys of self-sufficiency, being able to walk and function normally before they are struck down,” said Des Richardson.

Michael Huang, study co-author noted: “It’s great to work on such an intractable disease and by unveiling its underlying nuts and bolts to get results that can potentially help lots of people.”

The study appeared in the latest edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.