A Gluten for Punishment: the Whole Grain Assault on Health

gluten_punishment(1)From Few to You

Among thoughtful and informed medical providers and public alike, there is an ongoing transition toward recognizing adverse health effects from grains as being common and normal rather than rare and abnormal.  Not all medical providers, of course, support this Continue reading

Thyme out for Cold, Flu, and Other Organisms

thymeAnother member of the labiatae, or mint, family, thyme is an herb native to the Mediterranean basin and comes in many varieties. There is only one plant, thymus vulgaris, but the composition of the oil distilled from the plant shows variations in chemical components based on the location or region the plant grows in, despite being botanically identical. The microbial power of thyme is so powerful that some oils are safe to use in all situations, and some are not. Thymus vularis ct. linalol is the best oil for beginners to use and it is the safest to use on the skin, in baths, and on children and the elderly. Other chemotypes (ct) such as thymus vulgaris ct. thujanol, thymus vulgaris ct. thymol, Continue reading

Natural Ways to Banish Colds and Flu

Once the temperature drops, cold and flu season looms over health like dark storm clouds. Our fast-paced lifestyles, holiday travels and festivities, along with seasonal changes lead most of us to believe that colds and flu are inevitable facts of winter. But a healthy diet, lifestyle choices and supplementation offers protection year-round with natural solutions that help strengthen your defenses and keep you vibrant and energized.

Cold or Flu? Know the Difference

As an integrative physician, my patients often come to me with an important question: “How can I tell whether I have a cold or the flu?”

Both colds and flu are respiratory illnesses, but each is caused by different viruses. Colds are usually milder and present symptoms that include nasal stuffiness, sneezing and a runny nose. Adults and older children generally have minimal or no fever, but infants and toddlers often run a fever in the 100-102 degrees Fahrenheit range. Depending on which virus is the offender, a cold may also produce a headache, cough, postnasal drip, burning eyes, muscle aches or a decreased appetite — but the most prominent cold symptoms are usually in the nasal passages. Continue reading