Spearmint and Rosemary Could Roll Back Years on your Brain’s Odometer

spearmintOur bodies may have their own internal clocks — but our brains sure like to hit the snooze button.

You know what I’m talking about. When your alarm goes off at 6 a.m. and your brain is so foggy and slow you couldn’t win a spelling bee with a dictionary. On those days it takes an hour and two cups of coffee before you can Continue reading

Myth-Melting Study Finds Chocolate Burns Belly Fat, Improves Cholesterol

chocolateA new study published in the European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences has revealed something quite counterintuitive about chocolate, one of the world’s most prized ‘high-fat’ foods.  This strangely medicinal ‘sweat treat,’ which ironically you find in the candy aisle at the pharmacy, improved markers of cardiovascular disease, including the reduction of belly fat, and only after one week of consumption.

Researchers from Continue reading

Language Protein Differs in Males, Females

Findings could lead to greater understanding of sex differences in language acquisition

Male rat pups have more of a specific brain protein associated with language development than females, according to a study published February 20 in The Journal of Neuroscience. The study also found sex differences Continue reading

Could Your Sense of Smell Help with Alzheimer’s Prevention?

Improve Your Sense of Smell and Prevent Alzheimer’s

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is often the first stage of Alzheimer’s development and a primary symptom is the inability to differentiate between scents. Continue reading

Gene Distinguishes Early Birds from Night Owls and Helps Predict Time of Death

Common gene variant helps determine the time you will wake up each day — and the time of day you are likely to die

Many of the body’s processes follow a natural daily rhythm or so-called circadian clock. Continue reading

Gene Therapy for Hearing Loss: Potential and Limitations

Researchers can induce the generation of extra sensory hair cells in the cochlea.

Mature sensory hair cells are red, while immature hair cells are green.

The arrows indicate locations where hair cells are usually not found.

Regenerating Continue reading

New Procedure Repairs Severed Nerves in Minutes, Restoring Limb Use in Days or Weeks

Team apply new procedure to rapidly induce nerve regeneration in mammals

American scientists believe a new procedure to repair severed nerves could result in patients recovering in days or weeks, rather than months or years. The team used a cellular mechanism similar to that used by many invertebrates to repair damage to nerve axons. Their results are published today in the Journal of Neuroscience Research.

“We have developed a procedure which can repair severed nerves within minutes so that the behavior they control can be partially restored within days and often largely restored within two to four weeks,” said Professor George Bittner Continue reading

Don’t Sleep On Negative Feelings and Emotions

Difficult decisions can be made easier if you “sleep on it.” In contrast, after unfortunate news, trauma, a big argument or any emotional upset, sleep makes your bad feelings worse. So reduce mental strain after unpleasantness by staying awake for a while even if it’s the middle of the night. Otherwise, giving in to sleep magnifies and promotes your unsettled feelings.

Reining In Emotions

I previously wrote an article about the role excessive emotions play in poor health, a relationship described in the theories of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). I have also noted how the body is merely energetic vibrations. By changing your vibration, you can change your health. Vibration is energy. When we do, feel or even think negative things our body energy shifts. To get the essence of this concept, just think about a time when you felt invigorated or content, and then compare that to how you feel when you’re anxious, panicked or depressed. Continue reading

Salk Scientists Map the Frontiers of Vision

Pioneering vision study in mice will help revolutionize the study of brain function and mental disease

There’s a 3-D world in our brains. It’s a landscape that mimics the outside world, where the objects we see exist as collections of neural circuits and electrical impulses.

Now, scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies are using new tools they developed to chart that world, a key step in revolutionizing research into Continue reading

New Research Shows Dementia is Preventable with Natural Means

To hear many people in the mainstream media as well as mainstream medicine describe it, dementia is something similar to a curse: you will get it or you won’t, so all you can do as you get older is just wait and see. Fortunately, evidence is mounting that shows this simply isn’t so, and healthy and natural lifestyle choices can protect the brain and may prevent various forms of memory and identity robbing dementia.

For example, as NaturalNews previously reported, scientist William B. Grant, PhD, of the Sunlight, Nutrition, and Health Research Center (SUNARC), is researching a link between a lack of vitamin D and Alzheimer’s disease and other vascular dementias (http://www.naturalnews.com/026392_V…). And now comes word from two new studies that restful sleep and exercise  Continue reading

EU Grants Nearly $2.25M For Complementary Medicine Research

MUNICH – A three-year project called CAMbrella will receive nearly 1.5 million euros of European Union funding to establish a research network for the study of complementary medicine. The center for complementary medicine research at “Rechts der Isar,” the university hospital of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen will coordinate the project for the winning applicant group, which includes 16 scientific organizations from 12 European countries.

Patients in Vegetative State Can Learn, say Researchers

Virtual stimuli and anxiety

BUENOS AIRES – An international team of researchers have found that brains of patients in vegetative and minimally conscious state still appears to have the ability to learn.

The team hopes that the finding will lead to a simple test that will enable practitioners to assess the patient’s consciousness without the need of imaging.

During the study, the researchers from University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, the University of Cambridge, UK and the Institute of Cognitive Neurology, Argentina used the classical Pavlonian conditioning to test the responsiveness of patients in vegetative state.

The researchers played a tone immediately prior to blowing air into a patient’s eye.

After some time training, they found that the patients would start blinking when the tone played but before the air puff to the eye.

However, this was not seen in the control subjects, volunteers who had been under anaesthesia.This test will hopefully become a useful, simple tool to test for consciousness without the need for imaging or instructions,” Nature magazine quoted lead author Dr Tristan Bekinschtein, from the University of Cambridge’s Wolfson Brain Imaging Unit, as saying.

“Additionally, this research suggests that if the patient shows learning, then they are likely to recover to some degree,” Bekinschtein added.

The findings appear in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience.