Beginner’s Guide to Edible Mushrooms as Medicine

mushroom_research(1)Although mushrooms get good press as a low-calorie, high fiber, low-cholesterol, low-sodium decoration for your pizza, there is much more to the mushroom story than that.

Mushrooms have been valued for their culinary and medicinal properties for thousands of years and the Egyptians reserved them by law for the pharaoh.   Continue reading

Niacin, Exercise, and Sauna—A Simple and Effective Detox Program That Can Significantly Improve Your Health

saStory at-a-glance 

The average person is likely to have more than 500 – 1,000 times higher levels of toxic chemical in the fat compartment of their bodies, which includes all fatty adipose tissues, brain and lipids in blood, Continue reading

The Seven-Cent Cure for High Cholesterol

niacinA new report from the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service (OMNS), a top research group, claims that niacin — and not dangerous statins — is by far the most effective and affordable cure for keeping your nagging high cholesterol in check.

Niacin — a form of vitamin B3 — has been studied in more than 42,000 scientific papers, Continue reading

A Six Step Drug-Free Approach to Dementia

Dementia management without drugs

The mainstream doesn’t have a cure for dementia. But that doesn’t keep them from throwing drugs at it to see what sticks. Like, for example, drugging nursing-home patients with off-label antipsychotics Continue reading

Healing Successfully with Nicotinamide Is Changing Breast Cancer Treatment

If you’ve never had to endure mainstream medicine’s treatment for breast cancer — traumatic surgery an Successfully with doing  months of sickening radiation — I pray that you never will.

Conventional breast cancer treatment is energy-sapping. It’s mood-altering. It’s permanently disfiguring. Continue reading

Camu Camu

Did You Know…

… that the camu camu fruit has more vitamin C than any other known fruit in the world—and delivers miraculous therapeutic benefits?

Deep within the Peruvian Rainforest originates a berry so potent it can heal chronic diseases, Continue reading

Diet Shift: GMO Food Dangers

A hallmark of our modern times is the fact that too many of us now eat processed, chemicalized, ersatz food. So it’s no wonder metabolic and digestive problems are on the rise, as are food allergies and obesity. There are real dangers in consuming the standard American diet. It’s time to get back to real food.

Agrarian Lifestyle

For millennia prior to the Industrial Revolution, most humans lived an agrarian lifestyle and people raised the food they and their families ate. Fast forward to 2012, and other than kitchen or summer gardens, most people don’t grow their own food nor do they put up food for the winter. But growing your own is something that can significantly improve your meals and your health. Continue reading

The Big Benefits of B3

Vitamin B3 (a.k.a. niacin) hones in on the health benefits that it exerts in our bodies. This goes beyond its many roles, but actually describes the disease- fighting nature of the vitamin. It has much to do with the flow of blood in the body, as we’ll see here.

1. Hyperlipidemia, Coronary Heart Disease: “Hyperlipidemia” means high cholesterol and triglycerides. Vitamin B3 was used as early as 1955 to treat patients with high cholesterol. The nutrient, at doses of 1,000 to 4,000 milligrams (mg) a day, lowered triglycerides by 20% to 50%, and LDL (bad) cholesterol levels by 10% to 25%, while increasing HDL (good) cholesterol by 10% to 30%.

A major study in the 1960s and 70s tracked over 8,300 men aged 30 to 64 who’d had a heart attack in the past six years. Niacin, at three grams a day, reduced cholesterol by an average of 10%, triglycerides by 26%, another heart attack by 27%, and stroke by 26%. In another study, niacin was combined with a statin (i.e. a cholesterol-lowering drug) Continue reading

UVB-Exposed Mushrooms Shown To Have Higher Vitamin D Content

Considering the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. and abroad, researchers and nutritionists have been working on ways to increase consumption of the vital nutrient. A study that was published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry suggests that one solution may lie in fungi exposed to ultraviolet light.

In a trial, a team of researchers compared the vitamin D content of button mushrooms kept in the dark, fungi exposed to natural sunlight and mushrooms that were exposed to ultraviolet B (UVB) light.

The scientists observed a significant increase in vitamin D for the UVB-exposed vegetables — about 700 percent, in fact. Other nutrients found in the mushrooms, Continue reading

Ease Menopausal Symptoms Naturally with Red Clover

Red Clover (Trifolium Pratense) is a plant which is native to Europe as well as parts of Northwest Africa and Western Asia. The flower of this plant is the most commonly used part. Because of isoflavones that it contains, Red Clover has been used for many years as a remedy for menopausal symptoms including mood swings and hot flushes. This makes it a natural alternative to traditional hormone replacement therapy.

Health benefits associated with Red Clover are numerous. It is an excellent expectorant, which makes it useful in treating conditions such as bronchitis and asthma. These flowers also possess diuretic and sedative properties. It has also been reported to be an excellent detoxing agent for the body. It has been used as an all-natural anti-inflammatory for many years.

People suffering from osteoporosis may benefit from using Red Clover because of the fact that the isoflavones Continue reading

These Berries Help Prevent Cervical Cancer

What could be better than a delicious fruit that is also a cancer-fighting food? Raspberries are an antioxidant food that contains some special compounds called “ellagitannins.” This family of compounds, which are almost exclusive to the raspberry, is reported to have anti- cancer activity.

In recent health news, a study performed at the Ohio State University has found that raspberry extract could inhibit cervical cancer growth.

Cervical cancer is the second most common female cancer worldwide. It is a challenge for doctors to treat this type of cancer. Because of this, the researchers at Ohio University set out to investigate food-based cancer preventative measures — specifically, the raspberry. Three human cervical cancer cell lines were treated with a black raspberry extract for the clinical trial. Various tests Continue reading

Seaweed Shown To Promote Cardiovascular Health

Americans don’t typically consider seaweed to be a part of everyday meals, but research suggests that it may be a good idea for them to change their mind-set.

A team of scientists at Teagasc, the Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority and Memorial University, Newfoundland, reports that seaweed is commonly used in cosmetics and other skin treatments, but that the marine plant is in rich healthy compounds, so people should consider eating more of it.

“Seaweeds are a known source of essential fatty acids, which are thought to reduce thrombosis and atherosclerosis — factors important in the reduction of the risk of heart disease,” said researcher Maria Hayes, Ph.D. Continue reading

8 Beneficial Reasons you should Eat Beets

Beets are often ignored by shoppers, even if they are available all year round. Perhaps you’re one of those who pass by the beet section looking for other veggies. Understanding the merits of buying, preparing, and consuming beets might make you reconsider and give them a fair trial.

Before getting into the eight health reasons, here is some information on preparing beets.

Purchasing and Preparing

Whole fresh organic beets offer two vegetables in one. The leaves are edible and tasty if steamed and topped with some butter, lemon or lime and your favorite spices. Those greens are similar to spinach in taste and texture and quite nutritious. Simply separate the beets from the leaves and store them until there are enough to steam. Continue reading

Best Vitamins for Women

BEVERLY HILLS – Quality vitamins for women should perform important functions such as slowing the aging process, strengthening the immune system, increasing energy levels and supporting the balancing of the female hormones.

When considering which daily vitamins for women to take, keep in mind that the least costly ingredients are the vitamins and minerals. A woman’s body also needs a variety of anti-aging natural substances that are proven by clinical studies to provide specific health benefits.

Taking a high-quality anti-aging daily supplement helps fill in the dietary gaps that every woman will have. What woman really consumes the recommended 5-9 daily servings of vegetables and fruits each day? It’s difficult for anyone to do…

For example, your body will use nutrients such as amino acids, antioxidants, bioflavanoids, neuronutrients, enzymes and specialized substances such as L-Carnosine, alpha lipoic acid, acetyl L-Carnitine and so on.

And women have the need for certain nutrients that are different than men, nutrients that help support the balancing of the female hormones so necessary for good health.

Every woman in her 30’s and over MUST be providing her body with certain nutrients to be healthy. And taking one-a-day drugstore or supermarket vitamins for women is probably a waste of time and money.

Today’s women have special concerns when looking to find vitamins for women that help provide needed protection from illness.

For example, osteoporosis affects a large percentage of older women, and this condition typically begins in a woman’s 30’s. Daily dietary calcium and magnesium supplementation along with other nutrients that assist in absorption should be considered essential for any woman over 40.

Heart health has to be considered vital for a woman as she ages – and essential fatty acids are needed on a regular basis for a healthy heart. The need for women to have a healthy dietary balance of the Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids is well-documented in clinical trials.

Breast health and reproductive system health must be considered a high priority for today’s woman. Providing your body with nutrients that support the body’s immune system function and healthy tissue is essential when looking to find vitamins for women. These vitamins for women will provide the nutrients essential for good health.

Introducing – Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

Overview:

Vitamin B3 is one of 8 B vitamins. It is also known as niacin (nicotinic acid) and has 2 other forms, niacinamide (nicotinamide) and inositol hexanicotinate, which have different effects from niacin.

All B vitamins help the body to convert food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose), which is “burned” to produce energy. These B vitamins, often referred to as B complex vitamins, also help the body metabolize fats and protein. B complex vitamins are necessary for healthy skin, hair, eyes, and liver. They also help the nervous system function properly.

Niacin also helps the body make various sex and stress-related hormones in the adrenal glands and other parts of the body. Niacin is effective in improving circulation and reducing cholesterol levels in the blood.

All the B vitamins are water-soluble, meaning that the body does not store them.

The body’s needs for B3 can usually be met through diet; it is rare for anyone in the developed world to have a B3 deficiency. In the United States alcoholism is the prime cause of vitamin B3 deficiency.

Symptoms of mild deficiency include indigestion, fatigue, canker sores, vomiting, and depression. Severe deficiency can cause a condition known as pellagra. Pellagra is characterized by cracked, scaly skin, dementia, and diarrhea. It is generally treated with a nutritionally balanced diet and niacin supplements. Niacin deficiency also results in burning in the mouth and a swollen, bright red tongue

Very high doses of B3 (available by prescription) have been shown to prevent or improve symptoms of the following conditions. However, taken at high doses niacin can be toxic, so you should take doses higher than the Recommended Daily Allowance only under your doctor’s supervision. Researchers are trying to determine if inositol hexanicotinate has similar benefits without serious side effects, but so far results are preliminary.

High Cholesterol

Niacin (but not niacinamide) has been used since the 1950s to lower elevated LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and triglyceride (fat) levels in the blood and is more effective in increasing HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels than other cholesterol-lowering medications. However, side effects can be unpleasant and even dangerous. High doses of niacin cause flushing of the skin (which can be reduced by taking aspirin 30 minutes before the niacin), stomach upset (which usually subsides in a few weeks), headache, dizziness, and blurred vision. There is an increased risk of liver damage. A time-release form of niacin reduces flushing, but its long-term use is associated with liver damage. In addition, niacin can interact with other cholesterol-lowering drugs (see “Possible Interactions”). You should not take niacin at high doses without your doctor’s supervision.

Atherosclerosis

Because niacin lowers LDL and triglycerides in the blood, it may help prevent atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and is sometimes prescribed along with other medications. However, niacin also increases levels of homocysteine levels in the blood, which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease. This is another reason you should not take high doses of niacin without your doctor’s supervision.

Diabetes

Some evidence suggests that niacinamide (but not niacin) might help delay the onset of insulin dependence (in other words, delay the time that you would need to take insulin) in type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin, eventually destroying them. Niacinamide may help protect those cells for a time, but more research is needed to tell for sure.

The effect of niacin on type 2 diabetes is more complicated. People with type 2 diabetes often have high levels of fats and cholesterol in the blood, and niacin, often in conjunction with other drugs, can lower those levels. However, niacin can also raise blood sugar levels, resulting in hyperglycemia — particularly dangerous for someone with diabetes. For that reason, anyone with diabetes should take niacin only when directed to do so by their doctor, and should be carefully monitored for hyperglycemia.

Osteoarthritis

One preliminary study suggested that niacinamide may improve arthritis symptoms, including increasing joint mobility and reducing the amount of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) needed. But more research is needed to determine whether there is any real benefit.

Alzheimer’s disease

Population studies show that people who get higher levels of niacin in their diet have a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. No studies have evaluated niacin supplements, however.

Skin conditions

Topical forms of niacin are being studied as treatments for acne, aging, and prevention of skin cancer, although results are too early to know whether it is effective.

Dietary Sources:

The best dietary sources of vitamin B3 are found in beets, brewer’s yeast, beef liver, beef kidney, fish, salmon, swordfish, tuna, sunflower seeds, and peanuts. Bread and cereals are usually fortified with niacin. In addition, foods that contain tryptophan, an amino acid the body coverts into niacin, include poultry, red meat, eggs, and dairy products.

Available Forms:

Vitamin B3 is available in several different supplement forms: niacinamide, niacin, and inositol hexaniacinate. Niacin is available as a tablet or capsule in both regular and timed-release forms. The timed-release tablets and capsules may have fewer side effects than the regular niacin; however, the timed-release versions are more likely to cause liver damage. Regardless of the form of niacin being used, periodic checking of liver function tests is recommended when high doses (above 100 mg per day) of niacin are used.

How to Take It:

Daily recommendations for niacin in the diet of healthy individuals are listed below.

Generally, high doses of niacin are used to control specific diseases, such as high cholesterol. Such high doses are considered “pharmacologic” and must be prescribed by a doctor, who will have you increase the amount of niacin slowly, over the course of 4 – 6 weeks, and take the medicine with meals to avoid stomach irritation.

Pediatric

    * Infants birth to 6 months: 2 mg (adequate intake)

    * Infants 7 months to 1 year: 4 mg (adequate intake)

    * Children 1- 3 years: 6 mg (RDA)

    * Children 4 – 8 years: 8 mg (RDA)

    * Children 9 – 13 years: 12 mg (RDA)

    * Males 14 – 18 years: 16 mg (RDA)

    * Females 14 – 18 years: 14 mg (RDA)

Adult

    * Males 19 years and older: 16 mg (RDA)

    * Females 19 years and older: 14 mg (RDA)

    * Pregnant females: 18 mg (RDA)

    * Breastfeeding females: 17 mg (RDA)

Precautions:

Because of the potential for side effects and interactions with medications, you should take dietary supplements only under the supervision of a knowledgeable health care provider.

High doses (50 mg or more) of niacin can cause side effects. The most common side effect is called “niacin flush,” which is a burning, tingling sensation in the face and chest, and red or “flushed” skin. Taking an aspirin 30 minutes prior to the niacin may help reduce this symptom.

At the very high doses used to lower cholesterol and treat other conditions, liver damage and stomach ulcers can occur. Your health care provider will periodically check your liver function through a blood test.

People with a history of liver disease or stomach ulcers should not take niacin supplements. Those with diabetes or gallbladder disease should do so only under the close supervision of their doctor.

Niacin should not be used if you have gout.

Taking any one of the B complex vitamins for a long period of time can result in an imbalance of other important B vitamins. For this reason, it is generally important to take a B complex vitamin with any single B vitamin.

Possible Interactions:

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use niacin without first talking to your healthcare provider.

 

Antibiotics, Tetracycline — Niacin should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. (All vitamin B complex supplements act in this way and should therefore be taken at different times from tetracycline.)

Aspirin — Taking aspirin before taking niacin may reduce flushing associated with this vitamin, but should only be done under your doctor’s supervision.

Anticoagulants (blood thinners) — Niacin may make the effects of these medications stronger, increasing the risk of bleeding.

Blood Pressure Medications, Alpha-blockers — Niacin can make the effects of medications taken to lower blood pressure stronger, leading to the risk of low blood pressure.

Cholesterol-lowering Medications — Niacin binds bile-acid sequestrants (cholesterol-lowering medications such as colestipol, colesevelam, and cholestyramine) and may decrease their effectiveness. For this reason, niacin and these medications should be taken at different times of the day.

Recent scientific evidence suggests that taking niacin with simvastatin (a drug that belongs to a class of cholesterol-lowering medications known as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins), appears to slow down the progression of heart disease. However, the combination may also increase the likelihood for serious side effects, such as muscle inflammation or liver damage.

Diabetes Medications — Niacin may increase blood glucose (sugar) levels. People taking insulin, metformin, glyburide, glipizide, or other medications used to treat high blood sugar levels should monitor their blood sugar levels closely when taking niacin supplements.

Isoniazid (INH) — INH, a medication used to treat tuberculosis, may lower levels of niacin in the body and cause a deficiency.

Nicotine Patches — Using nicotine patches with niacin may worsen or increase the risk of flushing associated with niacin.

Alternative Names:

Inositol hexaniacinate; Niacin; Niacinamide; Nicotinamide; Nicotinic acid