NIH Study Links High Levels of Cadmium, Lead in Blood to Pregnancy Delay

Higher blood levels of cadmium in females, and higher blood levels of lead in males, delayed pregnancy in couples trying to become pregnant, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other academic research institutions.

Cigarette smoke is the most common source of exposure to cadmium,, a toxic metal found in the earth’s crust, which is used in batteries, pigments, metal coatings and plastics. Smokers are estimated to have twice the levels of cadmium as do non-smokers. Exposure also occurs in workplaces where cadmium-containing products are made, and from the air near industrial facilities that emit cadmium. Airborne cadmium particles can travel long distances before settling on the ground or water. Soil levels of cadmium vary with location. Fish, plants, and animals absorb cadmium from the environment, and all foods contain at least low levels of the metal.

Lead, a toxic metal also found in the earth’s crust, is used in a variety of products, such as ceramics, pipes, and batteries. Common sources of lead exposure in the United States include lead-based paint in older homes, Continue reading

Turkey Tail Mushroom Proven by NIH Study to Fight Breast Cancer

Did you know… that extracts from Turkey Tail mushrooms have been proven by an NIH study to cure cancer — especially breast cancer?

Some of the most exciting recent discoveries of Turkey Tail mushrooms’ cancer-fighting power are connected to world-renowned mycologist Paul Stamets. Mycologists are scientists who specialize in the branch of biology dedicated to the study of fungi.

Mycology includes studying fungi for genetic and biochemical properties and potential usefulness to humans, including medicinal applications.

Undoubtedly the most well-known and highly valued fungi-derived medicine is the life-saving antibiotic penicillin. But other fungi are highly medicinal as well, as Paul Stamets learned firsthand. Continue reading