The Real Facts on Fat Revealed

goodfatsPeople in America are scared of fat; or, at least, of the word fat. But if you consider the number of overweight and obese people, you would actually think that we love and embrace fat.

What’s interesting, though, is that many people misunderstand fat. They believe eating fat contributes to weight gain and results in an unhealthy lifestyle. Continue reading

How to Tell if You’re Eating Too Much

Achieving a manageable weight is something nearly all of us desire. However, only a small percentage of the population actually strives to improve their health. Nearly 159 million Americans are overweight, and 75 million of them are obese.

As we mentioned last time, these weight conditions result in numerous health problems that can be fatal.

The first step to weight loss and a healthier life is to know how many calories Continue reading

Natural Spider Vein Treatment: Get Rid of Spider Veins with Butcher’s Broom

You can once again wear shorts or skirts with confidence! All you need is a safe, natural spider vein treatment.

If you have struggled with the pain, swelling and unsightliness of spider and varicose veins, butcher’s broom (Ruscus Aculeatus), also known as box holly, could be the answer you’ve been looking for. Continue reading

Obese Teen Boys Have Up to 50 Percent Less Testosterone than Lean Boys, UB Study Finds

teenResults send “grim message” that obese teen males may become impotent, infertile adults  “These findings demonstrate that the effect of obesity is powerful, even in the young,” says UB’s Dandona, who led the research.

A study by the University at Buffalo shows for the first time that obese males ages 14 to 20 have up to 50 percent less total testosterone than do normal males of the same age, significantly increasing their potential to be impotent and infertile as adults.

The paper was published online as an accepted article in Clinical Endocrinology. Continue reading

Why Women Are at Risk for This Disease, Too

When you think of sleep apnea, what springs to mind? For most people, doctors included, it would be overweight men snoring in bed. However new research from Europe shows that women have much higher rates of this common breathing issue than we might have thought. And it can be quite serious.

Sleep apnea is Continue reading

Why Obese Adults Should Eat Differently

The way one’s body looks isn’t the only issue at play for overweight adults. Far more important are the chronic diseases that overweight and obese people face. For that reason, an important piece of health news has identified the best way to eat: the disease-prevention diet filled with healing foods.

The study found that a diet rich in slowly digested carbohydrates, such as whole grains, legumes, and other high- fiber foods, significantly reduces inflammation associated with chronic disease. This is known as a “low-glycemic-load” diet, which does not cause blood glucose levels to spike. It also increases a hormone that helps regulate how you break down fat and sugar.

The controlled study involved 80 healthy adults, Continue reading

Clean Fat out of Your Arteries with Ginkgo Biloba

Here’s some inside health news that could help protect your |heart. It concerns a potentially new health breakthrough in the fight against atherosclerosis. This amazing alternative remedy could help clear away dangerous fatty deposits in your arteries.

You may know about “Ginkgo biloba.” It’s the herb that has been championed for its ability to boost mental function and protect against Alzheimer’s. Recently, researchers have been discovering that “Ginkgo biloba” extract has antioxidant and antiplatelet properties. A Korean research team decided to take the investigation of ginkgo’s heart- healing properties one step further and see if the herb might protect against atherosclerosis.

For their animal study, Continue reading

The Truth about Bariatric Surgery You Must Know

With 31% of men and 33% of women being obese in the United States, the problem is an epidemic. Today, morbid obesity affects one in 50 adults. The most alarming trend may be the rising incidence of obesity among children.

While drugs and behavior therapy have had poor results, bariatric surgery for obese people can help sustain weight loss and treat related problems such as sleep apnea, asthma, diabetes, and clogged arteries. More than 140,000 bariatric surgeries are performed annually in the U.S. In the future, that number is set to rise three-fold.

There are three common procedures. To understand the nutritional complications involved, it’s important to know how your gastrointestinal tract is altered by the surgeries. Continue reading

Researchers Find Disease-Causing Fat Cells

UC Davis Health System researchers have discovered biological indicators that help explain why some obese people develop chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and others do not.
The researchers took a novel approach of looking specifically at the body fat of people with metabolic syndrome — a condition characterized by increased blood pressure, high-fasting blood-sugar levels, excess abdominal fat and abnormal cholesterol levels. They found the fat cells released biomarkers associated with insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, conditions often leading to diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

“Our study shows that not all obesity is the same and some body fat may actually be toxic,” Continue reading

Foods Rich in Protein, Dairy Products Help Dieters Preserve Muscle and Loose Belly Fat

New research suggests a higher-protein, lower-carbohydrate energy-restricted diet has a major positive impact on body composition, trimming belly fat and increasing lean muscle, particularly when the proteins come from dairy products.

The study, published in the September issue of the Journal of Nutrition, compared three groups of overweight and obese, but otherwise healthy, premenopausal women. Each consumed either low, medium or high amounts of dairy foods coupled with higher or lower amounts of protein and carbohydrates.

The women exercised seven days per week for four months, a routine that included five days  Continue reading

Obese Individuals at Risk for Social Anxiety Disorder

Researchers at Rhode Island Hospital have discovered that obese people may suffer from serious mental depression due to their weight. The study they conducted, which can be found online in the journal Depression and Anxiety, finds that obese individuals who suffer from anxiety due only to their weight may experience it as severely as those with social anxiety disorder (SAD).

The current criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual on Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) on SAD states that a person with a medical condition can be diagnosed with SAD only if their anxiety is unrelated to their medical condition. The research at Rhode Island Hospital concluded that obese people with weight-related anxiety experience significant social anxiety compared to individuals who have been diagnosed with SAD. Dr. Kristy Dalrymple, Ph.D., who led the study,  Continue reading

Is Lap-Band Surgery for Weight Loss Safe?

People used to have to be very obese to qualify for LAP-BAND surgery, a weight loss operation in which an inflatable silicon ring is wrapped around the stomach to create a small pouch, drastically limiting food consumption.  Until recently, the procedure was only approved for those with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or above, or patients with a BMI of 35 or above, plus a severe obesity-related illness, such as heart disease or diabetes. Now the FDA has expanded the criteria to include people who have a BMI of 30, along with an obesity-related disorder.

That means 37 million more Americans are  Continue reading

Lack of Sleep May Be Linked to Childhood Obesity

Infants and preschoolers who don’t get enough sleep at night are at increased risk for later childhood obesity, a new study suggests.

The researchers also found that daytime naps are not an adequate substitute for lost nighttime sleep in terms of preventing obesity.

The study included 1,930 U.S. children, ages 1 month to 13 years, who were divided into two groups — younger (ages 1 month to 59 months) and older (ages 5 to 13 years). Data on the children was collected at the start of the study (baseline) in 1997 and again in 2002 (follow-up).

At the follow-up, 33 percent of the younger children and 36 percent of the older children were overweight or obese. Among the younger children, lack of sufficient nighttime sleep at baseline was associated with increased risk for later overweight or obesity.

Among the older children, the amount of sleep at baseline was not associated with weight at follow-up. However, a lack of nighttime sleep at follow-up was associated with increased risk of a shift from normal weight to overweight and from overweight to obesity, the study found.

The findings “suggest that there is a critical window prior to age 5 years when nighttime sleep may be important for subsequent obesity status,” wrote Janice F. Bell of the University of Washington in Seattle, and Frederick J. Zimmerman of the University of California, Los Angeles.

“Sleep duration is a modifiable risk factor with potentially important implications for obesity prevention and treatment,” the authors concluded. “Insufficient nighttime sleep among infants and preschool-aged children appears to be a lasting risk factor for subsequent obesity, while contemporaneous sleep appears to be important to weight status in adolescents. Napping had no effects on the development of obesity and is not a substitute for sufficient nighttime sleep,” they added.

Weight Gain In Adulthood Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk

Body size and weight gain in younger and older adulthood may help weigh a man’s proneness to prostate cancer, according to a study by researchers at the University of Hawaii at Manoa’s Cancer Research Center of Hawaii.

 Led by Dr. Brenda Hernandez, the researchers said that the risk varies among different ethnic groups

 For the study, the researchers studied the relationship in a multiethnic population consisting of blacks, Japanese, Hispanics, Native Hawaiians and whites, and compared differences among age groups using the Multiethnic Cohort, a longitudinal study of men 45-75 years of age established in Hawaii and California from 1993-1996.

 Of the 83,879 men who participated in the study, 5,554 developed prostate cancer.

 Overall, men who were overweight or obese by age 21 had a decreased risk of localized and low-grade prostate cancer, according to Hernandez.

 Their results suggested that being overweight in older adulthood was associated with increased prostate cancer risk among white and Native Hawaiian men, but a decreased risk among Japanese men.

 While excessive weight gain between younger and older adulthood was observed to increase the risk of advanced and high-grade prostate cancers in white men and increase the risk of localized and low-grade disease in black men, it appeared to decrease the risk of localized prostate cancer in Japanese men.

 “The relationship of certain characteristics, such as body size, with cancer risk may vary across ethnic groups due to the combined influence of both genes and lifestyle,” said Hernandez.

 However, the relationship between body size and prostate cancer risk is not entirely understood.

 Excess fat is associated with a number of conditions that contribute to cancer development including low-grade chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, metabolic abnormalities, and hormone imbalances.

 These conditions may in turn contribute to more aggressive prostate malignancies.

 Ethnic differences in cancer risk may be explained by differences in the distribution of stored body fat that could have a differential effect on the development of prostate cancer.

 And the distribution of body fat may influence the specific way that excess fat influences cancer risk.