5 Tips to Keep Halloween Healthy

Halloween_HealthyWhen it comes to raising my 7-year-old daughter, one of the biggest challenges has been getting her to eat healthy. I’ve tried teaching her about nutrition, playing games, and yes-even a little bit of light-hearted bribery. But as it turns out, little girls are also little tanks that enjoy eating every delicious morsel in sight.

Halloween can be an especially difficult time of the year for health-minded parents like myself, thanks to the plethora of Snickers, Continue reading

Choose Natural Health Newsletter October 2014

fallFall is technically here, although since we are in the south traveling again,
the trees here are still green unlike back in Michigan.  When packing to travel
I have to make the decision of what to take with me.  I am of the old girls
scout school of ‘be prepared’ for anything and everything.  It just isn’t
possible to prepare for Continue reading

Health Ranger Research Breakthrough: How to Block nearly all the Mercury in your Diet Using Common, Everyday Foods

Strawberry-Half-Close-Up-2As part of my ongoing scientific research into heavy metals, elemental retention and metals capturing (see explanatory videos here), I have identified and documented anti-heavy-metals substances which have a remarkable natural affinity for binding with and “capturing” heavy metals.

Why is this important? Because much of the “scientific” community today is actually corporate-driven junk science that’s trying to poison you with mercury in vaccines, mercury in dental fillings, heavy metals in fluoride, GMOs, Continue reading

What Vitamins Reduce Inflammation in the Lungs?

lungsLung inflammation occurs when fluid collects either inside your lungs or within the inner lining of your lungs. The exact cause of lung inflammation varies, but toxins, pollutants, viral infections and lung diseases such as tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis and emphysema appear to contribute to this condition. Symptoms of lung inflammation include chest tightness, shortness of breath, Continue reading

Natural Tips for Healthy Nails

A lot of problems can contribute to unattractive nails, from a lack of nutrients to a biting habit. When you chew your nails, you not only make them look bad, you also invite infections. Even if you don’t chew them, poor eating habits rob your body of the nutrients it needs for strong, healthy nails. Brittle, short and dirty nails give the impression that someone has poor hygiene or doesn’t care about their health. If your nails aren’t as long and beautiful as you want them to be, consider changing up your diet or trying some natural remedies to stop biting.

Break the biting habit Continue reading

Fact or Myth: Can Food Combinations Supercharge Your Health?

food combosThis is a FACT.

Some foods are simply known for their nutritional benefits. As stand-alone items, certain fruits, vegetables, grains and legumes have proven time and again to be excellent choices for total body wellness as they boost immunity, burn fat and help your body operate at peak.

It makes sense that certain super food combinations would increase the benefits many times over. Some food combinations seem like they are meant to work together.

By adding these duos to your diet a couple of times each week, Continue reading

Boost Your Immune System with Zinc

zincDid you know that more than 300 unique enzymes need zinc to work effectively? Zinc is found in each cell of your body. It is involved directly in nearly every single bodily process that you can think of.

But that’s not all that makes zinc an amazing mineral. Zinc also has the power to boost your immune system in a special way. Continue reading

What Foods Trigger Headaches and Migraines?

Some of the most common foods, beverages, and additives associated with headaches include:

  • Aged cheese and other tyramine-containing foods: Tyramine is a substance found naturally in some foods. It is formed from the breakdown of protein as foods age. Generally, the longer a high-protein food ages, the greater the tyramine content. The amount of tyramine in cheeses differs greatly due to the variations in processing, fermenting, aging, degradation, or even bacterial contamination. For people who take monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor medications to treat their headaches, it is especially important to avoid all foods containing tyramine, including aged cheeses, red wine, alcoholic beverages, and some processed meats, as these foods can trigger severe high blood pressure.
  • Alcohol: Blood flow to your brain increases when you drink alcohol. Some scientists blame the headache on impurities in alcohol or by-products produced as your body metabolizes alcohol. Red wine, beer, whiskey, and champagne are the most commonly identified headache triggers.
  • Food additives: Preservatives (or additives) contained in certain foods can trigger headaches. The additives, such as nitrates, dilate blood vessels, causing headaches in some people.
  • Cold foods: Cold foods can cause headaches in some people. It’s more likely to occur if you are over-heated from exercise or hot temperatures. Pain, which is felt in the forehead, peaks 25 to 60 seconds and lasts from several seconds to one or two minutes. More than 90% of migraine sufferers report sensitivity to ice cream and cold substances.

Do Other Foods Trigger Headaches and Migraines?

These foods have been identified as headache and migraine triggers by some sufferers.

  • Peanuts, peanut butter, other nuts and seeds
  • Pizza
  • Potato chip products
  • Chicken livers and other organ meats
  • Smoked or dried fish
  • Sourdough bread, fresh baked yeast goods (donuts, cakes, homemade breads, and rolls)
  • Bread, crackers, and desserts containing cheese
  • Certain fresh fruits including ripe bananas, citrus fruits, papaya, red plums, raspberries, kiwi, pineapple
  • Dried fruits (figs, raisins, dates)
  • Soups made from meat extracts or bouillon (not homemade broth)
  • Cultured dairy products, sour cream, buttermilk, yogurt
  • Caffeine found in chocolate and cocoa; beverages such as coffee, tea and colas; also found in certain medications
  • Aspartame and other artificial sweeteners

 

What Cheeses Have High Tyramine Levels?

The following types of cheeses have been reported to be high in tyramine:

  • Blue cheeses
  • Brie
  • Cheddar
  • Stilton
  • Feta
  • Gorgonzola
  • Mozzarella
  • Muenster
  • Parmesan
  • Swiss
  • Processed cheese

Other foods high in tyramine are: aged, canned, cured or processed meats, certain beans (fava, broad, garbanzo, lima, pinto), onions, olives, pickles, avocados, raisins, canned soups, and nuts.

What Food Products Contain Additives?

  • Hot dogs
  • Ham
  • Sausage
  • Bacon
  • Luncheon meats and deli-style meats
  • Pepperoni
  • Other cured or processed meats
  • Some heart medications
  • MSG (monosodium glutamate). MSG is a food additive/flavor enhancer found in soy sauce, meat tenderizer, Asian foods, and a variety of packaged foods.

What Are the Symptoms of Food Additive-Induced Headaches?

Most headache symptoms begin within 20-25 minutes after consuming these products. They include:

  • Pressure in the chest
  • Tightening and pressure in the face
  • Burning sensation in the chest, neck, or shoulders
  • Facial flushing
  • Dizziness
  • Headache pain across the front or sides of the head
  • Abdominal discomfort

Other Butters May Replace Peanut Butter

Some U.S. schools are banning peanuts and peanut butter from school lunches but a Dallas nutrition expert says other nut butters can be used as substitutes.

Joyce Barnett, a registered clinical dietitian at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas says parents don’t necessarily need to reach for the cold cuts as a source of protein if their child’s school has banned peanut butter because it can cause an allergic reaction in some children.

“Spreads made from other nuts or seeds provide a nutritious alternative to peanut butter,” Barnett says in a statement.

Alternatives to peanut butter include:

— Almond butter is high in protein and is a great source of potassium. Research has shown that almonds, which are tree nuts, can help reduce the risk of heart disease as well as total cholesterol levels.

— Soy nut butter is made from soybeans and has as much fiber as peanut butter. It’s free of peanuts and tree nuts, but children with soy allergies should avoid it.

— Sunflower seed butter is free of peanuts and tree nuts. A two-tablespoon serving provides more than one-third of a child’s daily magnesium and vitamin E requirements.