The Pigments That Best Prevent Cancer

Carotenoids are back in the news again. These are the naturally occurring, fat-soluble pigments that provide the bright colors you see in certain plants and even animals. They are responsible for the red, yellow, and orange color of fruits and vegetables, and are also found in many dark green vegetables. Continue reading

Cabbage Must Be One of the Best Anti-Cancer Foods

Men with early signs of developing prostate cancer were able to prevent tumor growth by eating broccoli four times a week, according to a British study covered on MSN (http://health.msn.com/health-topics…). But broccoli is not the only cruciferous vegetable with anti-cancer properties.

Cabbage has a long history of use both as food and medicine, according to The George Mateljan Foundation for the World’s Healthiest Foods. Manual laborers were fed salted cabbage with their rice, according to William Duffy’s “Sugar Blues”, to keep them strong and healthy during the building of the Great Wall of China (http://www.naturalpedia.com/cabbage…). It was the only food they had besides their rice. Cabbage was also grown in Ancient Greek and Roman civilizations that held  Continue reading

Get 5 to 9 Fruit and Vegetable Servings Every Day

Here’s why: By now, you have probably heard that the new USDA recommendation for optimal health is to fill half of your plate with fruits and vegetables of all colors. Countless studies show that the fiber helps keep weight down and also that the different pigments in the skins of produce are powerful antioxidants that help the immune system function properly and prevent life-shortening diseases. The countries with the highest amount of centenarians eat very large portions of vegetables and consume almost none of our modern packaged foods. These centenarians live to a ripe old age in basically good health, suffering from very little heart and liver disease and showing very slight rates of cancer and degenerative diseases. Research supports this: compared with people who eat very small amounts of produce, those who eat larger amounts as part of a healthful diet are more likely to have reduced risk of stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, certain cancers, and many chronic conditions.

A few tips: Eat foods of all colors–red, yellow, green, white, Continue reading