Bee-Washing: It’s Pollination Week? Where Are the Bees?

bbeeStory at-a-glance

25,000 bumblebees were found dead in an Oregon parking lot just as National Pollinator Week recently kicked off

The bees were reported Continue reading

Seventy-Five Percent of Honey Bought at the Supermarket Isn’t Real Honey

honey2Large scale tests on US supermarket honey now reveal that roughly 75 percent of honey on the market isn’t even real. According to investigation by Food Safety News, today’s mass produced honey is often times void of real pollen, artificially processed and laundered from China. Honey manufacturing experts and the World Health Organization agree that real honey must contain true microscopic particles of pollen, to be considered real, with an identifiable source. Honey void of pollen is an artificial, nutrition-void, watered-down scam.

Watered down, heated, pressurized honey not real at all Continue reading

Ancient Natural Treatment Brings Allergy Relief

Well, the good news is that spring is in the air. The bad news is that pollen is too.

If you suffer from seasonal allergies like me, you know what a drag they can be. Instead of spending your spring smelling the roses, you spend it sifting through a medicine cabinet full of nasty nasal sprays and Continue reading

Bee Pollen: One of the World’s Most Perfect Super Foods

One of the most unique substances on the planet, bee pollen, probably doesn’t get the recognition it deserves. This super food possesses all of the nutrients essential to sustain human life, with a breakdown of 55 percent carbohydrates, 35 percent protein, three percent vitamins and minerals, two percent fatty acids and five percent other substances. Continue reading

Bee Research Sheds Light on Human Sweet Perception, Metabolic Disorders

A new-born honey bee worker (Apis mellifera) breaks free from her nursery chamber in the colony nest. A few weeks later, she will leave the hive in search for nectar and pollen to feed her siblings and mother queen. The genes vitellogenin and ultraspiracle, which regulate the bees’ behavioral transition to foraging tasks, also coordinate their carbohydrate metabolism, blood sugar levels, sweet taste, and several metabolic genes in adipose tissue. When vitellogenin and ultraspiracle are simultaneously suppressed in adipose cells, the bees develop a metabolic syndrome similar to Type 1 diabetes.
Photo by: Christofer Bang Continue reading

Alternative Food Sources that Bestow Availability, Nutrition and Other Uses

Alternative food sources in a world of shrinking resources are those that offer a diverse profile in terms of availability, nutrition and other important uses. Some food plants grow well in marginal soil, offer high nutrition, and have medicinal uses that could make them high priority in years to come. Easy propagation, tolerance of diverse growing conditions, multiple uses of its products, and beneficial nutrition would be earmarks of life-saving food crops. Another food source already utilized in other countries is insects. An online search for nutritious foods yields results such as broccoli, kale, avocadoes, bee pollen and others equally well-known. While these all-stars undoubtedly have a place in the pantheon of nutritious foods, a few other candidates could nose them out.

Moringa oleifera, also known as horseradish or drumstick tree, is a miracle tree grown throughout the tropics that can nevertheless withstand frost and frozen soil. It propagates easily from stumps, seeds, direct sowing, cuttings or natural regeneration. It is drought-resistant and fast-growing.  Continue reading

Allergy Season Welcomes Pollen Catching Machine

For allergy sufferers, April fool’s Day means something better than a good laugh. It means the start of the daily Gottlieb Allergy Count, a helpful predictor of how they should manage their symptoms.

On Friday, April 1, at 5 a.m., Dr. Joseph Leija, an allergist at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, will climb the stairs to the rooftop of the Gottlieb Professional Building in Melrose Park where he maintains a special pollen-catching machine. As he has for the past decade, Dr. Leija will carry samples down to his office, which he will examine under a microscope and formulate the official allergy count for the Midwest. He will do this every business day for the next six months through October, the end of the pollen-reporting season.

“It has been a very wet winter so there will be many  Continue reading

Study Reveals That Pollen Also Appears Outside Flowering Season

“There is of course a very close relationship between the moment at which pollen is released by plants and the data gathered by the traps used to measure these grains, but this is not always the case”, Rafael Tormo, a botanist from the University of Extremadura and co-author of the paper, tells SINC.

His team found delays or advances of up to a week between the time when the pollen of allergenic grass species (from genuses such as Poa, Agrostis, Bromus and Avena) and cupressaceae (cypresses and Arizona pine) are present in the air and their flowering period.

According to the study, which has been published in the International Journal of Biometeorology, these differences are probably due to the phenomenon of “resuspension” of the grains, caused by the wind and by pollen being transported from distant sources. Continue reading

Myths Related to Spring Allergies

WASHINGTON – Not satisfied with the kind of information available pertaining to spring allergies and need something reliable? Well, here’s what you need to read. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) and its allergist members, who are experts at diagnosing and treating allergies and asthma, have offered the following myth-busting advice: myth: over-the-counter (OTC, or nonprescription) oral antihistamines are just as effective as prescription medicines in controlling your stuffy nose. Act: TC antihistamines can help control some allergy symptoms but they have little effect on relieving a stuffy nose or the inflammation that often occurs with allergies. They also can make you drowsy. If your OTC medicine is not helping your stuffy nose or is causing side effects, your best bet is to see an allergist.

“We can prescribe more effective anti-inflammatory medications. But more importantly than that, also we can find the source of your suffering rather than just treating the symptoms,” said allergist Myron Zitt, of ACAAI.yth: TC decongestant nasal sprays are addictive act: TC decongestant nasal sprays are not technically addictive. However, if you overuse them, it may seem as though they are because you may need to use more and more to get relief from the congestion. To combat this, don’t use an OTC decongestant nasal spray more than three days in a row, and talk to your allergist about prescription nasal sprays containing steroids.yth:

Eating local honey will combat spring allergies.

Fact:

Local honey is made from the pollen of local flowers, so it might seem logical that eating it would increase your allergy tolerance. However, the pollens that cause spring allergies are produced by trees, grasses and weeds, not the showy flowers that bees buzz around. In fact, eating honey can be risky for some people, who could have an allergic reaction.

Myth:

Pollen allergy won’t lead to food allergy.

Fact:

Actually, about one third of people with pollen allergies also may react to certain foods. The reaction – called oral allergy syndrome or pollen-food allergy – is usually mild, including an itchy, tingling mouth, throat or lips. It has to do with similar proteins in the pollens.

Myth:

Allergy shots require too much time and are more expensive than taking medicine to relieve symptoms.

Fact:

Depending on how bothersome your allergies are, immunotherapy (allergy shots) may actually save you money and improve your quality of life. In fact, a recent study showed that immunotherapy reduced total health care costs in children with allergic rhinitis (hay fever) by one-third, and prescription costs by 16 percent.

Myth:

A blood test is the best test to diagnose allergies.

Fact:

Actually skin tests are more sensitive than blood tests. In skin testing, the skin on the inside of the arms or the back is pricked with a tiny bit of an allergen. If you’re allergic, the site will become red and swollen. Skin testing is very safe when performed by an allergist, even in infants and young children. But no single test alone provides the entire picture.