Flip your Genetic Switch and Fight Back Against Prostate Cancer

vitaAIf you suffer from prostate cancer, there’s a good chance you’ve never been told the real cause of your disease.

There may be a whole lot more to it than bad luck or lifestyle decisions, like the foods you eat. In fact, it may be as simple as this — you have a couple of lazy (but important) genes that are sleeping on the job!

You see, researchers believe that prostate cancer grows Continue reading

Are Researchers Hiding the Truth on Breast Cancer Treatment?

Breast cancer: Those words have the ability to send a chill up your spine unlike any other two words in the English language.

It’s rare to meet a person whose life hasn’t been touched in some way by this terrible disease. According to the American Cancer Society, one out of every eight American women Continue reading

Researchers Find our Inner Reptile Hearts

The genetic building blocks behind the human heart’s subtle control system have finally been identified.

The lizard has a heart that is virtually indistinguishable from a human embryonic heart. Continue reading

Yes, Fluoride Makes You Stupid

The next time somebody tries to tell you that there is no scientific evidence proving that fluoride chemicals are harmful to human health, simply point them to a new study review recently published in the Institute of Environmental Health Sciences journal Environmental Health Perspectives that shows, for something like the 25th time now, that fluoride damages brain development and leads to significantly lower IQ levels in humans. Continue reading

Breakthrough in the World of Vision Health

sightAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of age-related blindness. What used to be health secrets aren’t so secretive any more: natural medicine offers valuable protection against AMD. Now, for the time ever, researchers report that an oral nutraceutical may Continue reading

Researchers Say Urine Dipstick Test is Accurate Predictor of Renal Failure in Sepsis Patients

Henry Ford Hospital researchers have found that the presence of excess protein in a common urine test is an effective prognostic marker of acute renal failure in patients with severe sepsis.

Researchers analyzed data from 328 sepsis patients with no previous history of protein in the urine and found the urine dipstick test predicted the presence of renal failure in 55 percent of these patients. Continue reading

High Blood Sugar Connected with Memory Loss

This health e-letter concerns some recent news on the diabetes front. According to Japanese researchers, having diabetes will up your risk for dementia. Diabetes has been linked to cognitive problems before, but this new study shows that even pre-diabetes (blood sugar levels that are elevated higher than normal) raises the risk for Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

The Japanese researchers followed 1,017 men and women, age 60 and older. Each participant took a glucose test to determine if they were diabetic or pre-diabetic. The researchers then followed them for an average of 11 years. Two hundred and thirty-two of the participants subsequently developed dementia.

Now here’s where the study gets interesting. Continue reading

New Imaging Technique Evaluates Nerve Damage

A new imaging technique could help doctors and researchers more accurately assess the extent of nerve damage and healing in a live patient. Researchers at Laval University in Québec and Harvard Medical School in Boston aimed lasers at rats’ damaged sciatic nerves to create images of the individual neurons’ insulating sheath called myelin. Physical trauma, repetitive stress, bacterial infections, genetic mutations, and neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis can all cause neurons to lose myelin. The loss slows or halts the nerve’s transmission of electrical impulses and can result in symptoms such as numbness, pain, or poor muscle control.

Using their images of neurons, the researchers measured the thickness of the myelin at different locations Continue reading

Researchers Find Disease-Causing Fat Cells

UC Davis Health System researchers have discovered biological indicators that help explain why some obese people develop chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, and others do not.
The researchers took a novel approach of looking specifically at the body fat of people with metabolic syndrome — a condition characterized by increased blood pressure, high-fasting blood-sugar levels, excess abdominal fat and abnormal cholesterol levels. They found the fat cells released biomarkers associated with insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, conditions often leading to diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

“Our study shows that not all obesity is the same and some body fat may actually be toxic,” Continue reading

Drinking Coffee May Reduce Occurrences for Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is a serious concern for women. According to the National Cancer Institute, the disease took about 50,000 lives last year in the U.S. alone. But the mainstream media, as well as mainstream medicine, often treat breast cancer as something that strikes out of the blue — giving women no choice but to hope they are not one of the “unlucky” ones to get breast cancer. At the same time this subjects women to to mammography so a malignancy can be spotted early, despite the fact the actual radiation exposure associated with mammograms is known to raise the risk of breast cancer in some women (http://www.naturalnews.com/024901.html).

But here’s good news. Scientists studying natural compounds in plants are finding many may offer some level of protection against breast cancer. That means women can start taking control of their breast cancer risk by paying attention to what they eat and drink. In detailed research just published in BioMed Central’s  Continue reading