Study: Knee Surgery No Better Than Placebo

osteoarthritis_knee_greenmedinfoSurgery probably won’t help you with chronic knee pain.  But here are 10 proven ways to get you safely back in the swing of things.

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee affects over 12 percent of people over 60 years old.[i]  It’s a degenerative disease that causes pain, Continue reading

Tai Chi and Other Low-Impact Exercises May Be Ideal for Elderly People with Chronic Health Problems

taiStory at-a-glance –

For the elderly and those struggling with chronic health problems, low impact exercises like Tai Chi, yoga, and walking can give you the physical benefits of exercise

A systematic review found that Continue reading

Green Tea and Tai Chai Team Up to Protect Bones

Green tea is one of the latest superfoods making its way into bottled waters and energy drinks.  You’ll even find it in energy bars, mints, chewing gum and ice cream. It has many claimed health benefits.  Texas researchers add to the list with evidence that green tea aids in the prevention of osteoporosisContinue reading

Achieve Radiant Health Easily With A Method More Powerful Than Meditation

soulNeurocardiology Research Reveals…a Method Far More Powerful Than Meditation Alone for Achieving Total Well-Being and Radiant Health

One of surprising benefits of meditation is the connection between emotions and health which is supported by every major health research institution in the country. Even the U.S. Centers Continue reading

China’s Secret to Surviving Life after Stroke

Sometimes the hardest part about surviving a stroke is the difficult weeks and months of recovery that follow.

Whether you’re suffering from partial paralysis, or are just a little wobblier on your feet, the threat of a fall and a potentially serious fracture loom large over stroke survivors.

Well, some new help Continue reading

Dramatically Effective Natural Treatment Found for Stroke-Caused Brain Damage

Research findings just announced at the Canadian Stroke Congress provide hopeful news for stroke victims. A treatment has been documented that can improve memory, language, thinking and judgment problems by almost 50 percent — all within about six months after a person suffers a stroke. The therapy isn’t a new Big Pharma drug or surgical treatment. Instead, Continue reading

Inhale, and Reduce the Pain

In the past few years, there have been some great findings that point to an amazingly simply way to reduce the pain that you feel. Pain relief can’t come more easily than this: controlling the way you breathe.

Health breakthroughs about here, with research showing that controlled breathing at Continue reading

Try This Ancient Technique for Pain Relief

Pain is a symptom associated with just about every disease you can think of. There are different types of pain and different intensities of pain. Although it’s a symptom universally disliked by everyone, pain is often a just a warning that something is wrong. If you have stomach pain, maybe you’re eating a food you’re allergic to. If you have back pain, maybe you’re wearing the wrong shoes Continue reading

How to Relax for a Good Night’s Sleep

Not too many people will argue with the statement that North American culture is fast-paced. There never seems to be enough time to do all things that need to be done, whether it’s going to work, caring for kids or aging parents, doing chores, making meals, or keeping track of finances. While it’s good to have a full, active life, sometimes this frenetic pace can lead to stress and stress can lead to sleepless nights. And when you don’t get enough sleep, you open a Pandora’s Box of potential ailments that run the gamut from concentration problems to chronic fatigue.

To help de-stress and keep your body well clear of the sleep-deprived threshold that leads to health problems, why not try some tai chi? The exercises are not only soothing for your mind, but they can help your muscles stretch and tone, too. Having trouble motivating yourself? Tai chi costs very little, Continue reading

Time to Spring into Action and Shape Up

Swimsuit season is not as far away as you think! These longer, sunnier spring days are the perfect time to start fresh with a new fitness program. So shake off the winter lethargy, dust off those sneakers, and spring into action! This season, focus on having fun with fitness: whether you enjoy a brisk walk or prefer to dance the night away, your mind, body, spirit, and waistline will all reap the benefits

Get Inspired with Fun

If going to the gym is on par with doing your taxes, it is just not going to inspire you to get moving every day. The good news is that you don’t have to join a gym to get your body in motion. Choose an activity that you enjoy and chances are you will look forward to doing it every day. The examples that follow  Continue reading

Martial Arts Such As Tai Chi Can May Improve Mental Health

A recent assessment of over 40 studies is giving positive results using Tai Chi for improving mental health. Tai Chi is a gentle Chinese martial art of slow meditative physical exercise designed for relaxation and balance and health. This helps combines mental concentration, slow breathing and dance-like movements to increase life force energy.

Dr. Chenchen Wang, associate professor at Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine in Massachusetts, worked with a team of researchers to gather the results of the studies, including 17 randomized controlled trials, into the mental health effects of tai chi.

Wang stated, “Tai chi, the Chinese low-impact mind-body exercise, has been practiced for centuries for health and fitness in the East and is currently gaining popularity in the West. It is believed to improve mood and enhance overall psychological well being, but convincing evidence has so far been lacking.”

Wang and her colleagues found that practicing tai chi was associated with reduced stress, anxiety, depression and mood disturbance, and increased self-esteem.

Wang said, “More detailed knowledge about the physiological and psychological effects of tai chi exercise may lead to new approaches to promote health, treat chronic medical conditions, better inform clinical decisions and further explicate the mechanisms of successful mind-body medicine.”

In another similar study, Linda Larkey, PhD, of Arizona State University, and her research team scoured the medical literature, finding 77 published reports of scientific studies that looked at the two Chinese practices and compared them to other exercises or to a sedentary state.

The studies which we published between 1993 and 2007, looked at tai chi and qigong and the effects they have on health, physical function, falls, quality of life, one’s feeling of self-efficacy, immune system functioning, psychological symptoms, and other factors.

The 77 studies they found included 6,410 participants. Both forms of activity incorporate a wide range of physical movements and slow, meditative, dance-like movements. Larkey said that this study shows ”stronger evidence base” for the activities and their positive effects on bone health, cardio-respiratory fitness, physical functioning, balance, quality of life, fall prevention, and psychological health.

Larkey stated, “This combination of self-awareness with self-correction of the posture and movement of the body, the flow of breath, and mindfulness, are thought to comprise a state that activates the natural self-regulatory (self-healing) capacity.”

Submitted by Tyler Woods Ph.D. on 2010-07-15

Osteoarthritis Knee Pain Relieved with Tai Chi

BOSTON – A traditional Chinese martial art can help reduce pain and improve knee function among seniors with osteoarthritis, American researchers have found.

“Tai chi is a mind-body approach that appears to be an applicable treatment for older adults with knee osteoarthritis,” Dr. Chenchen Wang, co-author of a study published in The November issue of Arthritis Care & Research, said in a release.

Tai chi features slow, rhythmic movements designed to relax people and enhance balance, strength and flexibility.

In the study, researchers looked at 40 people with confirmed knee osteoarthritis from Boston who were in otherwise good health. They had an average age of 65.

Half the study participants took Yang-style tai chi sessions for one hour, twice a week for three months. The sessions included 10 minutes each of self-massage and review of principles, breathing techniques and relaxation, and 30 minutes of tai chi movements.

The rest took two 60-minute classes per week for three months to learn about diet and nutrition, and treatments for osteoarthritis. These participants also stretched for 20 minutes.

At the end of the 12-week period, people practising tai chi showed a significant decrease in knee pain on a standard pain scale compared with those in the control group.

The findings show the need to further evaluate the biological mechanisms of tai chi to extend its benefits to a wider population, Wang said.

No severe adverse events were reported.

Osteoarthritis affects an estimated 3,000,000 or one in 10 Canadians, according to the Arthritis Society

Osteoarthritis Knee Pain Relieved with Tai Chi

BOSTON – A traditional Chinese martial art can help reduce pain and improve knee function among seniors with osteoarthritis, American researchers have found.

“Tai chi is a mind-body approach that appears to be an applicable treatment for older adults with knee osteoarthritis,” Dr. Chenchen Wang, co-author of a study published in The November issue of Arthritis Care & Research, said in a release.

Tai chi features slow, rhythmic movements designed to relax people and enhance balance, strength and flexibility.

In the study, researchers looked at 40 people with confirmed knee osteoarthritis from Boston who were in otherwise good health. They had an average age of 65.

Half the study participants took Yang-style tai chi sessions for one hour, twice a week for three months. The sessions included 10 minutes each of self-massage and review of principles, breathing techniques and relaxation, and 30 minutes of tai chi movements.

The rest took two 60-minute classes per week for three months to learn about diet and nutrition, and treatments for osteoarthritis. These participants also stretched for 20 minutes.

At the end of the 12-week period, people practising tai chi showed a significant decrease in knee pain on a standard pain scale compared with those in the control group.

The findings show the need to further evaluate the biological mechanisms of tai chi to extend its benefits to a wider population, Wang said.

No severe adverse events were reported.

Osteoarthritis affects an estimated 3,000,000 or one in 10 Canadians, according to the Arthritis Society.

Chinese Martial Arts Tai Chi Offers Effective Treatment for Dizziness, Balance Disorders

SAN DIEGO –  A form of Chinese martial arts called Tai Chi may prove an effective treatment for patients who suffer from dizziness and balance disorders, also known as vestibular disorders.

In a study presented at the 2009 American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) Annual Meeting and OTO EXPO in San Diego, a team of researchers evaluated the utility of Tai Chi in managing patients with vestibular symptoms who have failed conventional vestibular therapy.

It could include individualized physical therapy or different sets of physical maneuvers that a doctor performs on a patient.

As part of the study, the researchers conducted a survey from April 2008 to March 2009 at an outpatient rehabilitation program, utilizing the activities-specific balance confidence scale and dynamic gait index survey, both prior to therapy and at the conclusion of an eight-week course.

A total of 21 patients (18 females, 3 males) completed the study to date.

According to the researchers, patients reported subjective improvements in their vestibular symptoms.

Based on their observations, the researchers came to the conclusion that the technique might be effective because Tai Chi promotes coordination through relaxation, rather than muscular coordination.

Tai Chi Relieves Osteoarthritis Knee Pain: Study

Tai Chi Relieves Osteoarthritis Knee Pain: Study

BOSTON – A traditional Chinese martial art can help reduce pain and improve knee function among seniors with osteoarthritis, American researchers have found.

“Tai chi is a mind-body approach that appears to be an applicable treatment for older adults with knee osteoarthritis,” Dr. Chenchen Wang, co-author of a study published in The November issue of Arthritis Care & Research, said in a release.

Tai chi features slow, rhythmic movements designed to relax people and enhance balance, strength and flexibility.

In the study, researchers looked at 40 people with confirmed knee osteoarthritis from Boston who were in otherwise good health. They had an average age of 65.

Half the study participants took Yang-style tai chi sessions for one hour, twice a week for three months. The sessions included 10 minutes each of self-massage and review of principles, breathing techniques and relaxation, and 30 minutes of tai chi movements.

The rest took two 60-minute classes per week for three months to learn about diet and nutrition, and treatments for osteoarthritis. These participants also stretched for 20 minutes.

At the end of the 12-week period, people practising tai chi showed a significant decrease in knee pain on a standard pain scale compared with those in the control group.

The findings show the need to further evaluate the biological mechanisms of tai chi to extend its benefits to a wider population, Wang said.

No severe adverse events were reported.

Osteoarthritis affects an estimated 3,000,000 or one in 10 Canadians, according to the Arthritis Society.