What’s In a Kiss? More Than You Realize…

kissingStory at-a-glance

Kissing as an indication of attachment may have begun with “kiss-feeding” – exchanging pre-masticated food from one mouth to another.

Emotional attachment may first be tied to a baby’s early facial recognition of mother during breastfeeding, Continue reading

Muscle Preservation

Andreas was a world-class bodybuilder who, by all appearances, was in the best shape of his life. His body was teeming with muscles and there was hardly an ounce of fat on him — he made the Incredible Hulk look like a beanpole.

And at 31 years of age, he did something that no 31-year-old should ever do — he died suddenly.

Years of bodybuilding supplements meant to enhance his performance and appearance had laid waste to his body. Continue reading

This Natural Mineral Could Boost Testosterone

 Testosterone is an important hormone in the male body. It is found in women, too, but men produce eight to 10 times more testosterone than women.

Testosterone is needed in men to help maintain muscle mass and strength, as well as bone mass and strength. Testosterone also helps to maintain a healthy libido, and mental and physical energy levels. Continue reading

The Best Fatty Acids for a Healthy Heart

Many people are confused about the consumption of fat when it comes to heart health. Too much fat raises cholesterol levels and ups your risk for heart disease. Not enough fat, however, has negative health effects, too. Your body needs healthy fat to give you energy and insulate you against heat loss. Every cell membrane contains fat. And fat is a component of myelin, Continue reading

The Scientific Side of Steroid Use and Abuse

Leslie Henderson is concerned about steroid abuse, not necessarily by sports luminaries like Barry Bonds and Mark McGwire, but rather by adolescents.

“There is this disconnect among young people that somehow your emotions, your thought processes—things that have to do with your brain—are separate and different from what steroids may be doing to your body—your muscles, your heart, or your liver, or anything like that,” says Henderson, a professor of physiology and neurobiology, and of biochemistry at the Geisel School of Medicine Continue reading

Your Brain Is Related To Your Sex Life

testoWhat do your brain and your sex life have in common? Testosterone.

Testosterone decreases with age. This causes an avalanche of other problems. Testosterone is truly the elixir of youth. With the exception of health enthusiasts, few people are even aware of the great importance of testosterone Continue reading

Help for Urinary Incontinence

Too often, urinary incontinence sufferers settle for wearing an adult diaper to cover up their urine problems. But for the one in six Americans who endure urinary incontinence, there are natural solutions to this troublesome difficulty.

The Incontinence Dilemma

While doing some research recently, I came across this statement in a mainstream health publication: “Incontinence is a problem that affects millions of people all over the world. In recent times, the adult diaper has emerged as one of the best solutions to this problem. This is a far better solution than many traditional remedies, Continue reading

Thirteen Sensual Aphrodisiac Foods to Improve your Sex Life

Almost everyone wants to improve their love life, find the perfect partner and have better sex. Some of the biggest pharmaceutical sales in history come from performance-enhancing drugs. What about using natural inducements for romance such as chocolate-dipped strawberries, grapes or truffles? Add some of these delectable delights to your arsenal of temptations and woo your lover into bliss.

Sensual foods

Chocolate — Chocolate works like no other food to stimulate human sexuality. It’s delicious, melts on the tongue and has an erotic quality even when not thinking of sex. According to Amy Reiley in her book, “Romancing the Stove: The Unabridged Guide to Aphrodisiac Foods,” chocolate helps thin the blood, Continue reading

Using Hormones? What You Need to Know

More and more people are using bio-identical hormone therapy. Though this therapy conveys a wide range of benefits, it can also pose the risk of undesirable side effects. But you can make this therapy safer and more effective with an individualized approach: Understand how your body metabolizes hormones and boost their benefits with the right diet, lifestyle and supplements.

Hormonal Help

As you age, your hormonal profile changes. For instance, menopause depletes the essential female hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. Research in Europe has demonstrated Continue reading

When Erectile Dysfunction isn’t Whole Story

For men with erectile dysfunction (ED), 65 percent are unable to have an orgasm and 58 percent have problems with ejaculation, according to new research led by physician-scientists at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

The study followed 12,130 men with mild to severe ED and is the largest-ever analysis of orgasmic and ejaculatory dysfunction. Results are published in today’s edition of the British Journal of Urology International.

Approximately 30 million American men, or half of all men aged 40 to 70, have trouble achieving or sustaining an erection. “While medications like Viagra or Cialis have been successful in helping many of these men, our research suggests there are other common sexual issues that remain largely unaddressed,” says Dr. Darius Paduch, the study’s lead author; male sexual medicine specialist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center; and assistant professor of urology Continue reading

How Testosterone Protects against Inflammation

Pharmacists of the University Jena analyze why men suffer more rarely from inflammatory diseases than women.

It’s all down to the testosterone: men are usually more muscular than women, they have deeper voices and more body hair. And – men are less susceptible to inflammatory diseases and allergies than women. This is also due to the male sex hormones as pharmacists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) have shown in a recent study.

“It is mostly women who are affected by diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis or asthma“, Professor Dr. Oliver Werz from the Jena University explains. Although this is a fact known for some time, the reasons for these differences are largely unknown. As the Jena Professor for pharmaceutical and medical chemistry Continue reading

Your Hands Reflect Your Health

They’re one of the most important parts of our body when it comes to day-to-day activities; without them we couldn’t cut vegetables, grip pliers, or text our friends. They’re revealing, too: Not only do scars and age spots recount our personal history but mystics all the way back to prehistory have “read” our futures in their lines and whorls.

But what if your hands could say more about you than that? What if, looking down at your palms and the five digits attached to them, you could discover early signs of dangerous diseases you didn’t yet know you had? “It used to be common for doctors to look at the hands for important clues to overall health,” says endocrinologist Kenneth Blanchard of  Continue reading

Insight into Men’s Testosterone Levels

Most people know that a man’s testosterone level peaks around age 20, and begins a steady decline from about 40 years old on, so that it is about 50% less by the time he is 80 years old.  What I don’t hear people talking about is the fact that, except in extreme cases, knowing what a man’s testosterone level is not really that helpful.  First, there is a huge range in what is considered ‘normal’ for testosterone.  For example, in men 20-30 years old, a normal testosterone level is anywhere between 270-1030 (almost a 4-fold difference). That level refers to total testosterone level, most of which travels through the body attached to a protein that keeps it from having any effect in the body.  Only free testosterone is what is important.  Furthermore, testosterone levels fluctuate greatly throughout the day.  Since testosterone levels are highest in the morning, which is usually when a sample is taken.

The other thing to consider is that since there is such a large range of normal, different men will feel differently with exactly the same testosterone level.  It is probably more helpful Continue reading

How Sex Hormones Influence Right Heart Function

WASHINGTON – A new study has revealed human sex hormones influence the structure and function of the right ventricle (RV) of the heart.

The researchers found that in women receiving hormone therapy, higher estrogen levels were associated with higher RV ejection fraction and lower RV end-systolic volume – both measures of the RV’s blood-pumping efficiency – but not in women who were not on hormone therapy, nor in men.

Conversely, higher testosterone levels were associated with greater RV mass and larger volumes in men, but not in women, and DHEA, an androgen which improves survival in animal models of pulmonary hypertension, was associated with greater RV mass and volumes in women, similar to the findings with testosterone in men.

For the study, researchers used blood samples and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the heart and measured sex hormones and RV structure and function in 1957 men and 1738 post-menopausal women.

“One of the most interesting things about this research is that we are focusing on individuals without clinical cardiovascular disease so that we may learn about determinants of RV morphology before there is frank RV dysfunction, which is an end-stage complication of many heart and lung diseases,” said Steven Kawut of the University of Pennsylvania School.

“When we study people who already have RV failure from long-standing conditions, the horse has already left the barn. We are trying to assess markers that could one day help us identify and intervene in individuals at risk for RV dysfunction before they get really sick,” he said,

Because the RV plays a critical role in supplying blood to the lungs and the rest of the body, RV function is closely tied to clinical outcomes in many diseases where both the heart and lungs are involved, such as pulmonary hypertension, COPD and congestive heart failure.

However, the RV is more difficult to study and image than the left ventricle and comparatively little is known about its structure and function and how to treat or prevent right heart failure.

Sex hormone levels could help explain a key paradox in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), where the RV response is an important determinant of survival. While women are far more likely to develop PAH, they also have better RV function and may have a better survival than men.

“It is possible that hormone balance could predispose them to developing PAH, but confer a protective benefit in terms of RV adaptation,” explained Kawut.

“We have shown differences in RV structure that go beyond the sexes and may depend on specific hormone levels,” he concluded. The study was published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Low Testosterone May Raise Risk of Early Death

WASHINGTON – A new research has linked low testosterone levels to a heightened risk of premature death from heart disease and all causes.

The finding refutes received wisdom that the hormone is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Researchers base their findings on 930 men, all of whom had coronary artery heart disease, and had been referred to a specialist heart centre between 2000 and 2002.
Their heart health was then tracked for around 7 years.

On referral, low testosterone was relatively common. One in four of the men was classified as having low testosterone, using measurements of either bioavailable testosterone (bio-T) – available for tissues to use – of under 2.6 mmol/l or total testosterone (TT) of under 8.1 mmol/l.

These measures indicate clinically defined testosterone deficiency, referred to as hypogonadism, as opposed to a tailing off in levels of the hormone as a result of ageing.

During the monitoring period almost twice as many men with low testosterone died as did those with normal levels. One in five (41) of those with low testosterone died, compared with one in eight (12pc) of those with normal levels.

The only factors that influenced this risk were heart failure (left ventricular dysfunction), treatment with aspirin or a high blood pressure drug (beta blocker) and low bio-T levels.

A low bio-T level was an independent risk factor for premature death from all causes and from heart disease, after taking account of other influential factors, such as age, other underlying health problems, smoking and weight.

Borderline levels of low total testosterone (15.1mmol/l) also increased the risk of an early death.

While high doses of testosterone found in anabolic steroids are harmful to health, the evidence suggests that low, rather than high, levels of the hormone are associated with obesity, risky blood fats, and insulin resistance, all of which are risk factors for diabetes and heart disease, say the authors.

Men at high risk of these diseases may stand most to gain from testosterone replacement, they suggest.

The study has been published online in Heart.