The World’s Population Is Getting Sicker

sickerStory at-a-glance −

Only 4 percent of the global population was free from health complaints in 2013
One-third, or 2.3 billion people, struggled with more than five health problems each
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Thyme: A Powerful Natural Antiseptic

thymeFor ancient Rome, thyme was believed to “promote vigor” and was used in their baths or spas. In Europe, singers even today, follow the tradition of gargling with thyme, marjoram and honey tea to preserve their voices.

Thyme along with sage and marjoram are recommended to use as Continue reading

Can Dental Stem Cell Technology Make Root Canals Obsolete?

dentalstemStem cell technology is promising in many respects and nowhere is that more evident than in the field of dentistry where painful root canals could become a thing of the past if promising advances in treating tooth decay pan out.

According to The Wall Street Journal, scientists have made Continue reading

Pasteurized Milk Is the Number One Allergic food

Did You Know…

…that mass produced pasteurized milk is the number one allergic food—but milk in its natural, raw state is loaded with health benefits?

     More than 12 million U.S. citizens currently contend with food allergies.  Not only that, Continue reading

How to Prevent Tooth Decay with Chocolate

[singlepic id=280 w=320 h=240 float=left]Strengthen Teeth and Prevent Tooth Decay…with Chocolate

In ancient times, people tried many different methods to keep their teeth clean – many of them were downright dangerous.

Egyptians in 5000 BC created tooth powder that contained ground ox hooves, myrrh, eggshells and pumice stone. The Romans and Greeks used shells and crushed bone in their version. Continue reading

New Chemical Makes Teeth ‘Cavity Proof’ – and Could Do Away with Dentist Visits Forever

  • Chemical could be added to toothpastes in years’ time
  • Kills bacteria that erode teeth
  • Single dose protects mouth for hours
  • ‘Keep 32’ chemical could even be added to foods

A new chemical could make human teeth Continue reading

Licorice Root Proven Effective against Oral Infections

A new study indicates that dried licorice root is effective against the bacteria which causes tooth decay and gum disease, both of which can lead to tooth loss. Reporting their findings in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Natural Products, researchers say that that two substances in dried licorice root may help prevent and treat tooth decay and gum disease.

Traditional healing, modern science

The dried root of the licorice plant has long been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Practitioners of TCM use dried licorice root for a variety of health concerns: to treat coughs, ulcers, sore throat, arthritis, lupus, liver disorders, food poisoning and diabetes. Licorice is known by herbalists to possess antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial properties. The medicinally used root is not an ingredient in the licorice candy sold in the US which uses the similarly flavored anise oil. Continue reading

Medical myths: Bizarre, but true…

Fat people are jollier

Ever since Falstaff, fatness has been associated with jollity. According to psychologists at Lakehead University in Canada, the “jolly fat” hypothesis might actually be true, at least among women. Not only have they found a link, they suggest a mechanism, too: estrogen.

They put forward the idea that body fat protects women again negative moods. In other words, the fatter a woman is, the less depressed she gets.

In the two-part research, the team looked at Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure that takes into account Continue reading

White Wines ‘Bad for the Teeth’

White Wines ‘Bad for the Teeth’

Enjoying a glass of white wine on a frequent basis can damage the teeth, something many wine makers and tasters will know first-hand, experts say.

Pale plonk packs an acidic punch that erodes enamel far more than red wine, Nutrition Research reports.

It is not the wine’s vintage, origin or alcohol that are key but its pH and duration of contact with the teeth.

Eating cheese at the same time could counter the effects, because it is rich in calcium, the German authors say.

It is the calcium in teeth that the wine attacks.

If you’re going to have a glass of wine do so with your meal and leave a break of at least 30 minutes afterwards before you brush your teeth and go to bed.

In the lab, adult teeth soaked in white wine for a day had a loss of both calcium and another mineral called phosphorus to depths of up to 60 micrometers in the enamel surface, which the researchers say is significant.

Riesling wines tended to have the greatest impact, having the lowest pH.

A “kinder” tooth choice would be a rich red like a Rioja or a Pinot noir, the Johannes Gutenberg University team found.

Even if people brush their teeth after a night of drinking, over the years repeated exposure could take its toll, say Brita Willershausen and her colleagues.

Indeed, excessive brushing might make matters worse and lead to further loss of enamel.

But they said: “The tradition of enjoying different cheeses for dessert, or in combination with drinking wine, might have a beneficial effect on preventing dental erosion since cheeses contain calcium in a high concentration.”

This helps neutralize and boost the remineralizing power of saliva to halt the acid attack.

But eating strawberries while supping on your vino or mixing sparkling whites with acid fruit juice to make a bucks fizz may spell trouble because this only adds to the acid attack.

Professor Damien Walmsley, of the British Dental Association, said: “The ability of acidic foods and drinks to erode tooth enamel is well understood, and white wine is recognized as being more erosive than red.

“But it’s the way you consume it that’s all important. If you’re going to have a glass of wine do so with your meal and leave a break of at least 30 minutes afterwards before you brush your teeth and go to bed.

“Consuming wine alongside food, rather than on its own, means the saliva you produce as you chew helps to neutralize its acidity and limits its erosive potential.

“And leaving time before brushing teeth gives the enamel a chance to recover from the acid attack and makes it less susceptible to being brushed away.”