A Beer a Day Could Keep the Doctor Away

beerA recent report in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology indicates people who drink beer have a 41% lower chance of developing and passing kidney stones. On the other hand, people who drink sugary colas are 23% more likely to experience that Continue reading

Extra Treatment during Prolapse Repair Reduces Incontinence Rate

Complications also more common in treated group, results of NIH study show

Surgery to repair pelvic organ prolapse often carries a risk of incontinence. To avoid scheduling a second surgery, some women may opt to have a second procedure to reduce incontinence at the time of their prolapse repair surgery.

A study fund Continue reading

10 Tips for Preventing Painful Kidney Stones

Researchers at the University of Parma in Italy state that kidney stones are increasingly common in wealthy industrialized countries. The most frequent form (80%), they say, is idiopathic calcium stone disease. This type of kidney stone contains calcium combined with oxalate or phosphate. There are other types of stones, too: one type is caused by infection in the urinary tract; and another is made from uric acid crystals.

Why do kidney stones develop? Normally, your urine contains chemicals that stop crystals from forming. But these chemicals don’t always do their job. In some people, crystals form stones. If kidney stones stay small enough, they will pass through your urinary tract and won’t cause you any problems.

Sometimes, however, kidney stones  Continue reading

Is Passivity the Future for Home Health Monitoring?

Proteus Biomedical’s Raisin Personal Monitor

Think there’s not enough evidence to prove the efficacy of wireless, home-based patient monitoring?

Robin Felder, associate director of clinical chemistry and toxicology and a pathology professor at the University of Virginia, disputes that notion. Felder likes to cite a 2007 paper in the Journal of Telemedicine and e-Health. That paper showed a 74 percent reduction in the cost of caring for patients in assisted living with “passive” monitoring devices, and, notably, the rate of urinary tract infections in the study group dropped to near zero. Continue reading