Hundreds of Dogs Killed by Contaminated Jerky Treats Made in China

Thousands of family dogs across the USA have been sickened by pet jerky treats made in China, and nearly 600 dogs have died. The FDA has issued a warning over the deadly jerky treats but has not forced any sort of product recall.

So far, the cause of the fatalities remains a mystery. The FDA says it has tested jerky treats for heavy metals, pesticides, antibiotics, chemicals and even Salmonella but cannot find the cause. Continue reading

Milk Thistle May Prevent Photo-Aging and Skin Cancer

milkthistle 2For more than 2,000 years, a spiky purple plant known as the “liver herb,” has been used in traditional medicine for healing a wide range of conditions from mushroom poisoning to indigestion.  Modern researchers have now added the prevention of photo-aging and skin cancer to the long list of milk thistle’s benefits. Continue reading

How to Prevent Accidental Poisoning At Home

Poison control centers report that more than half of the incidents they handle each year involve children under the age of six. The majority of these poisoning injuries result from the inadvertent ingestion of common household substances. Learning to reduce the likelihood of a poisoning incident in your home is an essential part of safe parenting and childcare provision, simply because even the most Continue reading

Heavy Metal Poisoning

 Did You Know……your daily jogging routine could cause a host of unpleasant side effects?      Are you an avid, or even occasional jogger?  Do you jog beside main roads?  If so, you’re putting yourself at risk for an abundance of nasty conditions, such as… Continue reading

Top Healing Foods that Stop Ovarian Cancer in its Tracks

Ovarian cancer is one of the most deadly diseases out there. It is the fifth leading cause of cancer death among U.S. women — an astounding 14,000 out of 23,000 diagnosed each year, die. Ovarian cancer tends to be aggressive and generally has very few symptoms until it reaches an advanced stage. Fortunately, several natural remedies have proven to be exceptionally useful in both preventing and curing this silent killer. Ginger, ginkgo biloba, green tea and flaxseed are all remarkably effective Continue reading

Important Vitamin Safety Tips

Vitamin C information everybody needs to consider whether you take a prescription drug or a natural supplement. I’m talking about dosage and safety notes.

Various dosages of vitamin C have been used depending on the purpose:

  • Treating common colds: One to three grams (g) a day
  • Preventing common colds: 600-1,000 milligrams (mg) a day
  • Preventing sunburn: Two grams of vitamin C together with vitamin E (1,000 international units [IU])
  • Preventing hardening of the artery: Slow-release vitamin C 250 mg plus 136 IU of vitamin E twice a day

Continue reading

Ginger Root Eases Nausea and Vomiting

Ginger root is a favorite among herbalists, used in a variety of situations. The spicy root, or rhizome, of the ginger plant can either be eaten raw, powdered, made into tea, juiced, tinctured, or even candied. One of the most common uses for ginger root is for nausea and vomiting. Placebo-controlled, double-blind studies have proven that ginger root effectively reduces nausea and vomiting caused by motion sickness, surgery, and morning sickness during pregnancy. Because organic ginger root is completely safe to use during pregnancy, the herb is especially treasured by pregnant women around the world.

Ginger root is an effective antidote for motion sickness while at sea

A Danish study published in 1988 tested the effects of ginger root powder on 80 new Naval cadets who were out on the high seas in stormy weather for the first time. The sea-sick cadets were either given a placebo or 1 gram of ginger root powder, then measured every hour for symptoms of motion sickness for four hours. Continue reading

Is West Nile Still a Threat to You?

Make sure you wear long pants and shirts when outside between sunset and sunrise. At least that’s the recommendation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

It seems that the number of West Nile cases is on the rise. The CDC reported that, in 2009, there were 720 confirmed cases of West Nile and 32 fatalities. In 2010, numbers were up, with 1,021 confirmed cases and 57 deaths.

Peak mosquito season is in August and September and the number of West Nile cases is expected to rise even more in 2011.

If you are infected with West Nile, Continue reading

Stress Erodes your Health and Depletes your Serotonin Levels.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) sees stress as qi stagnation: Your life force has stalled. To nudge back into the fast lane, up shift your lifestyle with a more balanced diet, improved sleep routine and exercise. That can steer your health back on track while restoring your vim and vigor.

Stress erodes your health and undermines your quality of life. Western medicine views stress as a psychological issue or a psychosomatic response to what is happening around you. That is to say, it’s a physical manifestation in the body of what the mind perceives and struggles with. The negative effects of stress, then, are to be managed in various ways while you learn new coping skills.

In the East, stress is looked at in different terms. In fact, according to the theories of TCM, stress leads to what is termed “qi stagnation.” Here, qi is described as life force, which is to say the “motive force” within the body. This motive force sustains life by pulling in oxygen, expelling carbon dioxide, moving the muscles, digesting food and, in fact, Continue reading

What is Food Poisoning?

Food poisoning is an illness caused by eating foods that have harmful organisms in them. These harmful germs can include bacteria, parasites, and viruses. They are mostly found in raw meat, chicken, fish, and eggs, but they can spread to any type of food. They can also grow on food that is left out on counters or outdoors or is stored too long before you eat it. Sometimes food poisoning happens when people do not wash their hands before they touch food.

Most of the time, food poisoning is mild and goes away after a few days. All you can do is wait for your body to get rid of the germ that is causing the illness. But some types of food poisoning may be more serious, and you may need to see a doctor.

What are the symptoms?

The first symptom of food poisoning is usually diarrhea. You may also feel sick to your stomach, vomit, or have stomach cramps. How you feel when you have food poisoning mostly depends on how healthy you are and what germ is making you sick.

If you vomit or have diarrhea a lot, you can get dehydrated. Dehydration means that your body has lost too much fluid. Watch for signs of dehydration, which include having a dry mouth, feeling lightheaded, and passing only a little dark urine. Children and the elderly can get dehydrated very quickly and should be watched closely. Pregnant women should always call a doctor if they think they may have food poisoning.

How do harmful germs get into food?

Germs can get into food when:

  • Meat is processed. It is normal to find bacteria in the intestines of healthy animals that we use for food. Sometimes the bacteria get mixed up with the parts of those animals that we eat.
  • The food is watered or washed. If the water used to irrigate or wash fresh fruits and vegetables has germs from animal manure or human sewage in it, those germs can get on the fruits and vegetables.
  • The food is prepared. When someone who has germs on his or her hands touches the food, or if the food touches other food that has germs on it, the germs can spread. For example, if you use the same cutting board for chopping vegetables and preparing raw meat, germs from the raw meat can get on the vegetables.

How will you know if you have food poisoning?

Because most food poisoning is mild and goes away after a few days, most people do not go to the doctor. You can usually assume that you have food poisoning if other people who ate the same food also got sick.

If you think you have food poisoning, call your local health department to report it. This could help keep others from getting sick.

Call your doctor if you think you may have a serious illness. If your diarrhea or vomiting is very bad or if you do not start to get better after a few days, you may need to see your doctor.

If you do go to the doctor, he or she will ask you about your symptoms (diarrhea, feeling sick to your stomach, or throwing up), ask about your health in general, and do a physical exam. Your doctor will ask about where you have been eating and whether anyone who ate the same foods is also sick. Sometimes the doctor will take stool or blood samples and have them tested.

How is it treated?

In most cases, food poisoning goes away on its own in 2 to 3 days. All you need to do is rest and get plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration. Drink a cup of water or rehydration drink (such as Lytren, Pedialyte, or Rehydralyte) each time you have a large, loose stool. You can also use a sports drink, such as Gatorade. Soda and fruit juices have too much sugar and should not be used to rehydrate. Doctors recommend trying to eat normally as soon as possible. When you can eat without vomiting, try to eat the kind of foods you usually do. But try to stay away from foods that are high in fat or sugar.

Antibiotics are usually not used to treat food poisoning. Medicines that stop diarrhea (antidiarrheals) can be helpful, but they should not be given to infants or young children.

If you think you are severely dehydrated, you may need to go to the hospital. And in some severe cases, such as for botulism or E. coli infection, you may need medical care right away.

How can you prevent food poisoning?

You can prevent most cases of food poisoning with these simple steps:

  • Clean. Wash your hands often and always before you touch food. Keep your knives, cutting boards, and counters clean. You can wash them with hot, soapy water, or put items in the dishwasher and use a disinfectant on your counter. Wash fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Separate. Keep germs from raw meat from getting on fruits, vegetables, and other foods. Put cooked meat on a clean platter, not back on the one that held the raw meat.
  • Cook. Make sure that meat, chicken, fish, and eggs are fully cooked.
  • Chill. Refrigerate leftovers right away. Don’t leave cut fruits and vegetables at room temperature for a long time.
  • When in doubt, throw it out. If you are not sure if a food is safe, don’t eat it.