The Benefits of Minimally Invasive Dentistry

Story at-a-glance

  • Early intervention with minimally invasive dentistry can eliminate 80 percent of future dental interventions on the vast majority of patients
  • By identifying hypocalcific areas and using a miniature air abrasion tip to clean out those pits, fissures and grooves, Continue reading

DIY Home Remedies and Old Wives Cures Using Baking Soda

In a world awash with pharmaceutical drugs for everything from dandruff to toenail fungus, it’s refreshing to have do-it-yourself home remedies and trusted old wives cures to heal a wide range of ailments. Baking soda is a staple in most homes and is useful for cooking, cleaning and in many home remedies. Although it’s safe when used as directed, baking soda can cause side effects. Read the warning section below and check with your healthcare practitioner before using baking soda home remedies. Continue reading

Maximize Minerals to Minimize Health Problems

By now, almost everyone interested in optimal health knows that fruits and vegetables are crucial for preserving wellness. Often overlooked; the minerals in these foods are vital ingredients for helping the body reduce its acidity and avoid chronic disease. Continue reading

Teeth Damaged by White Wine

Teeth Damaged by White Wine

Enjoying a glass of white wine on a frequent basis can damage the teeth, something many wine makers and tasters will know first-hand, experts say.ale plonk packs an acidic punch that erodes enamel far more than red wine, Nutrition Research reports.

It is not the wine’s vintage, origin or alcohol that are key but its pH and duration of contact with the teeth.

Eating cheese at the same time could counter the effects, because it is rich in calcium, the German authors say.

It is the calcium in teeth that the wine attacks.

If you’re going to have a glass of wine do so with your meal and leave a break of at least 30 minutes afterwards before you brush your teeth and go to bed.

In the lab, adult teeth soaked in white wine for a day had a loss of both calcium and another mineral called phosphorus to depths of up to 60 micrometers in the enamel surface, which the researchers say is significant.

Riesling wines tended to have the greatest impact, having the lowest pH.

A “kinder” tooth choice would be a rich red like a Rioja or a Pinot noir, the Johannes Gutenberg University team found.

Even if people brush their teeth after a night of drinking, over the years repeated exposure could take its toll, say Brita Willershausen and her colleagues.

Indeed, excessive brushing might make matters worse and lead to further loss of enamel.

But they said: “The tradition of enjoying different cheeses for dessert, or in combination with drinking wine, might have a beneficial effect on preventing dental erosion since cheeses contain calcium in a high concentration.”

This helps neutralize and boost the remineralizing power of saliva to halt the acid attack.

But eating strawberries while supping on your vino or mixing sparkling whites with acid fruit juice to make a bucks fizz may spell trouble because this only adds to the acid attack.

Professor Damien Walmsley, of the British Dental Association, said: “The ability of acidic foods and drinks to erode tooth enamel is well understood, and white wine is recognized as being more erosive than red.

“But it’s the way you consume it that’s all important. If you’re going to have a glass of wine do so with your meal and leave a break of at least 30 minutes afterwards before you brush your teeth and go to bed.

“Consuming wine alongside food, rather than on its own, means the saliva you produce as you chew helps to neutralize its acidity and limits its erosive potential.

“And leaving time before brushing teeth gives the enamel a chance to recover from the acid attack and makes it less susceptible to being brushed away.”

White Wines ‘Bad for the Teeth’

White Wines ‘Bad for the Teeth’

Enjoying a glass of white wine on a frequent basis can damage the teeth, something many wine makers and tasters will know first-hand, experts say.

Pale plonk packs an acidic punch that erodes enamel far more than red wine, Nutrition Research reports.

It is not the wine’s vintage, origin or alcohol that are key but its pH and duration of contact with the teeth.

Eating cheese at the same time could counter the effects, because it is rich in calcium, the German authors say.

It is the calcium in teeth that the wine attacks.

If you’re going to have a glass of wine do so with your meal and leave a break of at least 30 minutes afterwards before you brush your teeth and go to bed.

In the lab, adult teeth soaked in white wine for a day had a loss of both calcium and another mineral called phosphorus to depths of up to 60 micrometers in the enamel surface, which the researchers say is significant.

Riesling wines tended to have the greatest impact, having the lowest pH.

A “kinder” tooth choice would be a rich red like a Rioja or a Pinot noir, the Johannes Gutenberg University team found.

Even if people brush their teeth after a night of drinking, over the years repeated exposure could take its toll, say Brita Willershausen and her colleagues.

Indeed, excessive brushing might make matters worse and lead to further loss of enamel.

But they said: “The tradition of enjoying different cheeses for dessert, or in combination with drinking wine, might have a beneficial effect on preventing dental erosion since cheeses contain calcium in a high concentration.”

This helps neutralize and boost the remineralizing power of saliva to halt the acid attack.

But eating strawberries while supping on your vino or mixing sparkling whites with acid fruit juice to make a bucks fizz may spell trouble because this only adds to the acid attack.

Professor Damien Walmsley, of the British Dental Association, said: “The ability of acidic foods and drinks to erode tooth enamel is well understood, and white wine is recognized as being more erosive than red.

“But it’s the way you consume it that’s all important. If you’re going to have a glass of wine do so with your meal and leave a break of at least 30 minutes afterwards before you brush your teeth and go to bed.

“Consuming wine alongside food, rather than on its own, means the saliva you produce as you chew helps to neutralize its acidity and limits its erosive potential.

“And leaving time before brushing teeth gives the enamel a chance to recover from the acid attack and makes it less susceptible to being brushed away.”