The Perfect Activity for Retirees

Here’s some health advice for older seniors: go for a walk. Many times seniors ask: “What’s the best exercise for me now that I am in my 80s?” This is because other health problems can interfere with being active. Combine this with fears about losing balance and possibly falling, and you’ve got a recipe for a sedentary lifestyle. But, for most, walking can be Continue reading

Have A Nice Day/Week/Month/Year/Life!

Have you ever been so depressed that you could not concentrate at work, were short and irritable with people close to you, had no energy or just couldn’t care about anything?  Then your depression is taking too large a toll and there are things you can do and skills you can develop.

True depression is a clinical state and may need serious, even medical, attention.  The interesting truth is that when most people say, “I’m depressed,” what they are really saying is “I’m disappointed.”  It’s easy to point at a situation or person as the culprit; but most often, we are actually disappointed with decisions we have made, in what we’ve done, what we haven’t done, what we’ve said or haven’t said, or with whom we’ve chosen to align ourselves.  We are disappointed by choices we have made.

People who have a Positive Mental Attitude rarely get “down.”  Continue reading

Active Lifestyle May Help Counter Obesity Genes

Exercise can reduce a person’s genetic predisposition to obesity by 40 percent, finds a new English study.

Researchers looked at 20,430 people in Norwich and focused on genetic variants known to increase the risk of obesity. Most people had inherited 10 to 13 of these variants from their parents, but some had more than 17 while others had fewer than six.

The participants also provided information about their levels of physical activity.

Overall, each additional obesity-related genetic variant was associated with an increase in body mass index (BMI) equivalent to 445 grams (0.98 pounds) for a person 1.70 meters (5 feet, 6 inches) tall. BMI is a measurement that takes into account a person’s height and weight.

However, this effect was greater in sedentary people than in active people, the researchers found. For those with a physically active lifestyle the increase was 379 grams (0.84 pounds) per genetic variant. That’s 36 percent less than the increase of 592 grams (1.3 pounds) per genetic variant for inactive people.

The researchers also found that each additional obesity susceptibility variant increased the odds of obesity by 1.1-fold. But this risk was 40 percent lower for active people compared to inactive people, the findings revealed.

The study shows that adopting a healthy lifestyle can benefit people at increased genetic risk of obesity, the authors explained.