Add Acerola to your Diet

Did You Know…

… that the acerola fruit can help you lose weight, protect against cancer and heart disease, and boost your immune system with more vitamin C power than an orange?

Similar in appearance to a red cherry, the acerola fruit originates from Mexico and from Central and South America.  Continue reading

How to Detox Aluminum and why it’s Necessary

We are in the “Age of Aluminum”, this according to a lecture by Dr. Chris Exley, PhD at a January 2011 vaccine safety conference in Jamaica. A common expression among those who deflect aluminum’s toxicity issues is that aluminum is prominent throughout the earth’s crust. What they fail to mention is that aluminum (Al) wasn’t widely bioavailable to humans until the latter part of the 19th Century when it began to be mined for creating metals and medicines. Continue reading

Erectile Dysfunction and Diabetes type 1 Linked to Soy and Soy Products

Over the past few years, soy has been hailed as a miracle health food. Unfortunately, the complete opposite is true. Soy has been linked to a myriad of health conditions such as infantile leukemia, various forms of cancer, type-1 diabetes, malnutrition, thyroid dysfunction and even erectile dysfunction.

Research has shown that babies who have been fed soy-based formulas were at higher risk for developing type-1 diabetes and thyroid disease later in life. Soy-based formulas also contain up to 1000 times more aluminum than non soy-based formulas.

Soy contains a large amount of anti-nutrients (otherwise known as toxins). One of these is what is referred to as enzyme inhibitors. Enzyme inhibitors block the action of the enzymes which are required to digest proteins. Even cooking the soy at high temperatures does not break down these inhibitors. As a result, consuming soy and soy products can lead to conditions such as reduced protein digestion, excessive bloating, a deficiency of essential amino acids, abnormal thyroid functions, a higher risk of breast cancer in women who have had ovaries removed and abnormal blood  Continue reading

Using Robots and Computer Vision To Diagnose Mental Disorders in Children

A University of Minnesota research team was recently awarded two grants totaling more than $3 million from the National Science Foundation’s Cyber-Enabled Discovery and MRI Programs to create robotic devices and computer vision algorithms that will assist with the early diagnosis of children at risk of developing disorders such as autism, attention deficit disorder (ADD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

The team led by computer science and engineering professor Nikolaos Papanikolopoulos in the University’s College of Science and Engineering, is developing robotic instruments that could observe and automatically analyze abnormalities in children’s movements and behaviors. Researchers have been using the Xbox Kinect to track the subjects, but in the future the technology could be expanded. By using novel robots, such as robot pets and robotic sandboxes, equipped with specialized detectors and software, the researchers will analyze the probability of abnormalities based on facial expressions and body positions.

“Researchers and scientists believe that psychiatric disorders display subtle physical abnormalities in childhood well before the onset of a full disorder,” said Papanikolopoulos. “We believe that we can use new computational tools, including computer vision and robotics, with a unique new computer vision algorithm to observe and detect abnormalities in motor and emotion in children to automatically analyze them for abnormalities.”

Traditionally, experts have conducted psychiatric assessments using a visual rating system after watching videos of the subjects’ motor movements and facial emotional expressions. Those expert ratings are subjective, and are limited to the observer’s particular expertise. In addition, the method is costly.

This cross-disciplinary research seeks to create a diagnostic instrument for mental disorders that combines the fields of computer vision/robotics and computer science with child psychology and psychiatry.

Using these new tools, the research team members hope to be able to create more effective tools for detecting at-risk children at an earlier age. Ultimately, they hope to create a diagnostic framework, including workshops and tutorials, as well as demonstrations to distribute their work and make it more widely available.