“Healthy Foods” Now Containing Excitotoxins Which Can Lead to Brain Damage

Did You Know…that dozens of everyday “health” foods containing brain-damaging poisons, which seriously threaten your health—and such foods are not regulated by the FDA or other government agencies?

“Your food can be a killer—and I don’t mean just the junk food”, says Dr. David Blyweiss. That’s because processed foods—even so-called healthy foods—contain additives known as “excitotoxins” that cause serious neurodegenerative damage like Parkinson’s disease…Alzheimer’s…dementia…Lou Gehrig’s…multiple sclerosis…lupus…and more.

“The main culprits are the additives monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartate (a component of NutraSweet) that lace our foods to enhance their taste,” says Dr. Blyweiss. Excitotoxins have been used for decades to pump up the flavor of processed foods like soups, snacks, sauces, gravies, and also many low-fat and vegetarian “health” foods. Continue reading

Astaxanthin Benefits Helps Prevent Alzheimer’s

A carotenoid found in algae has been shown to prevent dementia — including Alzheimer’s, a disease that conventional medicine has yet to conquer?

The incidence of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease increases rapidly with age. One out of five people over age 65 — and 50% of people over age 85 are afflicted with Alzheimer’s. At least 5.2 million Americans over the age of 65 suffer from the disease, and 200,000 under the age of 65 are living with younger-onset Alzheimer’s.

The good news is that recent research conducted by Japanese scientists shows that an antioxidant called astaxanthin prevents the build-up of dangerous compounds Continue reading

Scientists Create Natural Alzheimer’s-Fighting Compound in Lab

Scientists at Yale University have developed the first practical method to create a compound called huperzine A in the lab. The compound, which occurs naturally in a species of moss found in China, is an enzyme inhibitor that has been used to treat Alzheimer’s disease in China since the late 1990s and is sold in the U.S. as a dietary supplement to help maintain memory. Scientists believe it could also potentially combat the effects of chemical warfare agents.

Until now, researchers have only been able to derive small amounts of the compound directly from the Huperzia serrata plant, or had to resort to lengthy and cumbersome methods to synthesize it in the lab.

Now researchers at Yale have developed a practical and cost-effective method to synthesize huperzine A in the lab. The process requires just eight steps and produces a yield of 40 percent. Previously, the best synthetic techniques had required twice as many steps and achieved yields of only two percent.

“Being able to synthesize large amounts of huperzine A in the lab is crucial because the plant itself, Continue reading

One Step at a Time can keep your Brain Sharp

Step by step by step by step. Walking, as it turns out, just might keep your brain sharp well into retirement age. So slip on those sneakers and read this.

New research shows that walking about six miles per week may protect brain size and, in turn, preserve memory in old age. The study was published in the latest online issue of “Neurology.” And what jumps out about that finding is that six miles a week is not an awfully significant distance!

The size of your brain shrinks in late adulthood. This can trigger problems with memory. Age-related memory loss is a common problem in society, but one misconception is that it’s something we all have to live with, because it happens naturally. In fact, this isn’t correct at all. There are many ways to help protect your memory as you age. And this study focuses on one: the exercise option. Continue reading

Grape and Grape Extract Compounds Protect Against Alzheimer Progression

Researchers publishing the result of a study in the Journal of Alzheimer`s Disease found that eating grapes and supplementing with grape seed extract compounds help to prevent the development and progression of Alzheimer`s dementia. This devastating form of dementia is characterized by the accumulation of beta-protein clusters in the brain known as oligomers. A wealth of prior research studies concludes that excess oligomers poison neurons in the brain and cause memory loss associated with the disease. A number of different natural compounds, including grapes and grape extracts, provide a powerful protective shield against the progressive memory loss experienced with Alzheimer`s dementia.

Researchers wanted to follow up on prior studies showing that grape seed polyphenolic extract (GSPE) stops alpha-beta oligomers from being formed in test tube experiments. Using mice that have been bred to genetically develop Alzheimer`s disease, scientists set to determine the effect of grape polyphenols on cognitive decline. For a period of five months they added GSPE to a standard diet and tested the mice for signs of memory deterioration normally found in this line of transgenic animals.

After the five month period, researchers found that the mice had dramatically lowered levels of alpha beta-56, Continue reading

Balance Problems May be Early Sign of Alzheimer’s

Falls and balance problems may be early indicators of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report July 17, 2011, at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference on Alzheimer ’s disease in Paris.

Scientists found that study participants with brain changes suggestive of early Alzheimer’s disease were more likely to fall than those whose brains did not show the same changes. Until now, falls had only been associated with Alzheimer’s in the late stages of dementia.

“If you meet these people on the street,  Continue reading

Detoxify your Body from Radiation using Coffee and Seaweed Enemas

People seem to be in two camps these days. There are those who know that the radiation from Fukushima is dangerous and will have impacts, so they protect themselves through diet and supplementation. And there are those who think it`s all fine and even radioactive poisons with half lives of tens of thousands of years won`t harm them. The latter group will almost surely be stunned to find themselves with cancer, Alzheimer`s disease, or any variety of toxicity-induced diseases because they still haven`t understood that poisons cause disease and that there`s quite a bit each of us can do to influence the equation – without a doctor involved at all. Many people are eating seaweed these days and it`s an important step with any radiation disaster. Another important step is to get serious about detoxification – especially using enemas with coffee, seaweed and cilantro.

Why coffee, seaweed and cilantro? Well, coffee enemas have been around for ages. They actually used to be in the Merck manual as a standard for health – before the drug companies  Continue reading

Trading Low Cholesterol for Diabetes?

According to NHS statistics, it won’t be long before one in four adults over the age of 40, in the UK, is taking a statin drug… There’s a similar statin drive currently taking place in the US. The US government’s National Cholesterol Education Program panel advised those at risk for heart disease to attempt to reduce their LDL ‘bad’ cholesterol to specific, very low levels by taking statins.

Frankly, the statins-craze is downright ridiculous and the fact that these drugs are dominating the market is a clear indication of the power of Big Pharma’s marketing machine… the odds are almost 100 to 1, that if you’re taking a statin drug you don’t need it!

Worse still, statin drugs have severe side effects… this is a well-established fact  Continue reading

Alternative Medicine Breakthroughs from Dr. Mercola and Dr. Oz

Just recently Dr. Joe Mercola was a guest on The Doctor Oz Show. Dr. Mercola, often called the “alternative health Guru” and Dr. Oz discussed the fact that that many medical doctors don’t believe in alternative medicine in “The Man Your Doctor Doesn’t Want You To Listen To” segment of the show.

Dr. Mercola believes that many medical conditions can be addressed through eating a healthy diet and taking natural supplements rather than taking pharmaceutical medications.

When Dr. Oz pointed out that Dr. Mercola sells supplements on his website Continue reading

Alzheimer’s Links to Nutrition

Research is trying to determine whether Alzheimer’s disease might be slowed or prevented with nutritional approaches, but a new study suggests those efforts could be improved by use of nutrient “biomarkers” to objectively assess the nutrient status of elderly people at risk for dementia.

The traditional approach, which primarily relies on self-reported dietary surveys, asks people to remember what they have eaten. Such surveys don’t consider two common problems in elderly populations – the effect that memory impairment has on recall of their diet, or digestive issues that could affect the absorption of nutrients.

This issue is of particular concern, experts say, because age is the primary risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, and the upcoming wave of baby boomers and people 85 years and older will soon place many more people at risk for dementia.

“Dietary and nutritional studies have yielded some intriguing results, but they are inconsistent,” said Emily Ho, an associate professor of nutrition at Oregon State University, co-author of the study, and principal investigator with OSU’s Linus Pauling Institute.

“If we are going to determine with scientific accuracy whether one or another nutritional approach to preventing dementia may have value, we must have methods that accurately reflect the nutritional status of patients,” Ho said. “The gold standard to assess nutritional status should be biomarkers based on blood tests.”

The research was just published in Alzheimer’s Disease and Associated Disorders, in work supported by the National Institutes of Health. The study was led by Dr. Gene Bowman, a nutrition and aging researcher at Oregon Health and Science University, in collaboration with OSU researchers.

Prevention strategies for Alzheimer’s disease are “becoming more feasible,” researchers said, because scientists are beginning to understand what populations are at high risk for developing the disease.

“One of the issues in doing a good study is to understand the nutritional status of your participants when you start and how the nutrient treatment changes it,” Ho said. “Giving supplements or foods to a person who already has a normal nutritional status of that nutrient may be very different than if the person is deficient.”

Complicating the issue, she said, is that elderly people in general may not absorb or process many nutrients as well as younger adults, and because of genetic differences they many have different biological responses to the same level of a nutrient. Knowing what they ate gives, at best, only a partial picture of what their nutritional status actually is. And it also assumes that people, including those with beginning dementia, will always remember with accuracy what their diet actually has been when questioned about 124 food items in an interview that can last up to two hours.

In this study, the scientists recruited 38 elderly participants, half with documented memory deficit and the other half cognitively intact. They compared the reliability of the nutrient biomarkers to food questionnaires administered twice over one month.

The questionnaire was able to determine some nutrient levels, but only in the group with good memory. The reliability of the nutrient biomarkers depended on the nutrient of interest, but overall performed very well.

“Now that we have a reliable blood test for assessing nutritional status, we can begin to study nutrient biomarkers in combination, their interactive features, and how they collectively may influence chronic diseases, including risk for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia,” Bowman said.

Such approaches could lead to more effective nutritional therapies in the future to promote cognitive health, he said.

THE SECRET OF A LONGER LIFE

VARIETY on our meal tables holds the key to a long and healthy life.

Food that contains anti-oxidants, wholegrain and vital fatty acids can cut the risk of killer illnesses including heart disease, Alzheimer’s and diabetes, a study shows.

Scientists found that the diet could reduce cholesterol – a significant cause of heart disease – by a third and bring blood pressure down by nearly a tenth.
But rather than just a narrow range of foods being responsible for boosting health, the research showed that the answer was a widely varied diet that might include oily fish, porridge oats and blueberries.

Nutritionist Angela Dowden said: “The key is definitely to introduce these kinds of foods into the diet. It is a very healthy diet and completely proves the point that it is about healthy eating as a whole, not just doing one thing.

“It is a lifestyle change instead of tweaks here and there. It could be that it is just one of the foods that is producing these effects but it is much more likely that it is an additive affect of them all contributing.

“I think this study is very interesting and it is showing time and time again that it is about an additive approach, not just doing one thing.”

Ms Dowden, who was not part of the research group, added: “This is another spin on the Mediterranean diet.“All of these foods have independently been shown to have some health benefits so it makes sense that they have a big impact when combined.”

It has long been known that keeping active and a healthy diet can hold back the onset of a range of diseases like heart problems and cancer.
Previous studies have put this down to eating lots of antioxidant-rich fruits, vegetables and nuts, others to a diet rich in fish containing essential fatty acids, like fresh mackerel, and some to wholegrain cereals.

But the results of the study carried out at Ant diabetic Food Centre at Lund University in Sweden have shown that it is multiple rather than just single foods with anti-inflammatory effects that work wonders.

Inger Björck, professor of food-related nutrition at the university and head of the Ant diabetic Food Centre, who carried out the research, said: “The results have exceeded our expectations. I would like to claim that there has been no previous study with similar effects on healthy subjects. Our purpose was to find out which preventive effect can be obtained on established risk markers by combining food concepts with an expected positive impact on inflammation.

“We hope that these results on healthy subjects will inspire more intense preventive efforts in society.”

She said it was not possible to tell precisely which food factors had a greater or lesser impact on the research results.

“That’s the point,” she added. “We believe in the idea of combined effects. Drug or specific products with health claims affect only one or maybe a couple of risk factors.

“By a combination of food you can in a simple and striking way affect many risk parameters simultaneously.”

The study saw 44 healthy but overweight people between the ages of 50 and 75 take part.

They ate foods which are presumed to reduce low-grade inflammation in the body, a condition which in turn triggers metabolic syndrome which leads to obesity, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

The test diet was high in antioxidants, low-GI foods – which release carbohydrates slowly – omega fatty acids, wholegrain products, probiotics and viscous dietary fiber.

Examples of foods the test group ate included oily fish, barley, soy protein, blueberries, almonds, cinnamon, vinegar and a certain type of wholegrain bread.
The results showed that the diet slashed bad cholesterol by 33 per cent, lipids – blood fats – by 14 per cent, blood pressure by 8 per cent and a risk marker for blood clots by 26 per cent.

A marker of inflammation in the body was also greatly reduced, while memory and cognitive function were improved.

Inflammation is thought by some experts to be one of the chief causes of chronic diseases.

It can lead to cells becoming damaged and turning cancerous and inflammation has been linked to a higher risk of developing heart disease.

This is Britain’s biggest killer, claiming the lives of one in five men and one in seven women.

About 2.6 million people in this country have Type 2 diabetes, which is caused by poor diet and a lack of exercise.

More than 820,000 people have a form of dementia, with more than half suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. By 2025, a million people will have dementia, soaring to 1.7 million by 2051.

Blueberry Juice Improves Memory In Older People

Researchers from the US and Canada have for the first time found evidence that a few glasses of blueberry juice a day improved memory in older adults; the findings come from a small study of 70-year olds showing early signs of memory loss, and the researchers suggest the findings establish a basis for comprehensive human clinical trials to test whether blueberries really deserve their growing reputation as a memory enhancer.

The study was the work of Dr Robert Krikorian, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center in Cincinnati, Ohio and colleagues, and a report about it appears in the 4 January ASAP issue of the American Chemical Society’s bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

The authors wrote there is an urgent need to develop preventive approaches to dementia which is on the rise as our population ages and there is no effective therapy for it.

Blueberries contain polyphenols, comprising mostly anthocyanins, which are known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, combating oxidative stress, which contributes to some neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases.

A paper in a February 2008 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, that presented the findings of the 2007 International Berry Health Benefits Symposium, suggested that these compounds have beneficial effects on cancer, aging, neurological diseases, inflammation, diabetes and bacterial infections.

The authors also wrote that animal studies have found they contribute to increased neuron-to-neuron communication, improved use of glucose in the brain, and are involved in memory function.

It would be reasonable to expect, therefore, that such compounds might delay neurodegeneration in humans, hence the motive for this work.

For the study, Krikorian and colleagues recruited 9 people in their 70s showing early signs of memory changes, got them to complete memory and cognition tests, then asked them them to drink two to two and a half cups of commercially available blueberry juice a day.

12 weeks later, the volunteers underwent the same memory and cognition tests. When they compared the before and after results, the researchers found the volunteers who had drunk blueberry juice had improved paired associate learning (p = 0.009) and word list (p = 0.04) recall. The results also showed a trend toward reduced depressive symptoms (p = 0.08) and lower glucose levels (p = 0.10), said the researchers.

These results were then compared with the results of another trial of the same design involving a demographically matched group of people in their 70s who also had early signs of memory changes, but this time they were given a placebo that they thought was blueberry juice.

The researchers said that the improved performance of the blueberry group over the placebo group on the paired associated memory test was similar to the difference in the before and after results observed in the blueberry group in the earlier trial.

They concluded that:

“The findings of this preliminary study suggest that moderate-term blueberry supplementation can confer neurocognitive benefit and establish a basis for more comprehensive human trials to study preventive potential and neuronal mechanisms.”

“These preliminary memory findings are encouraging and suggest that consistent supplementation with blueberries may offer an approach to forestall or mitigate neurodegeneration,” they wrote.

Source: American Chemical Society.