Green Tea Compounds Effective Against Tumors and Genetic Diseases

Tea is the most popular beverage in the world and many people drink it for its pleasant taste, comfort, and general health benefits.  But green tea can do much more. It can save lives. Continue reading

Less Than 1Tsp. Ginger and Cinnamon Daily Relieves Muscle Soreness in Athletes

Many well-intentioned workout resolutions have been thwarted by the first signs of sore, stiff muscles in the days following a visit to the gym.  A new study finds that two common kitchen spices help relieve that post-workout muscle pain.

Researchers at Iran’s Isfahan University of Continue reading

Muscle Preservation

Andreas was a world-class bodybuilder who, by all appearances, was in the best shape of his life. His body was teeming with muscles and there was hardly an ounce of fat on him — he made the Incredible Hulk look like a beanpole.

And at 31 years of age, he did something that no 31-year-old should ever do — he died suddenly.

Years of bodybuilding supplements meant to enhance his performance and appearance had laid waste to his body. Continue reading

Bee Pollen: One of the World’s Most Perfect Super Foods

One of the most unique substances on the planet, bee pollen, probably doesn’t get the recognition it deserves. This super food possesses all of the nutrients essential to sustain human life, with a breakdown of 55 percent carbohydrates, 35 percent protein, three percent vitamins and minerals, two percent fatty acids and five percent other substances. Continue reading

Female and Younger Athletes Take Longer to Overcome Concussions

New research out of Michigan State University reveals female athletes and younger athletes take longer to recover from concussions, findings that call for physicians and athletic trainers to take sex and age into account when dealing with the injury. Continue reading

Painful Legacy of Teen Sports

New study links high rates of osteoarthritis in athletes to femur damage during adolescence, as a result of participation in high-intensity sports

Vigorous sports activities, like basketball, during childhood and adolescence can cause abnormal development of the femur in young athletes, resulting in a deformed hip with reduced rotation and pain during movement. This may explain why athletes are more likely to develop osteoarthritis than more sedentary individuals, according to Dr. Klaus Siebenrock, from the University of Bern in Switzerland, and colleagues, whose work is published online in Springer’s journal Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research.

Siebenrock and colleagues found that, in those studied, osteoarthritis of the hip was more prevalent in high-level athletes than in those who do not take part in regular sports. It is also linked to higher intensity activities and greater physical loading of the hip. He noted other investigations have found that male athletes, particularly those who play soccer and handball, and take part in competitive track and field activities involving running and jumping, are at greater risk of early osteoarthritis of the hip.

Siebenrock and colleagues compared  Continue reading