Finally, the Truth Revealed About Gout

Are you one of the millions of Americans who notices a throbbing pain in their toe, knee, or elbow after they eat a big steak dinner or have a tall glass of beer? If you are, then it could be related to this nasty culprit: gout.

Gout affects six million Americans and, as baby boomers age, the number is expected to rise. Continue reading

Fermented Foods

My education about cultured and fermented foods was for many years the same as everybody else.  I heard the commercials touting the benefits of eating yogurt and heard about the need for acidophilus.  It wasn’t until I started exploring the idea of fermenting foods that I really understood how beneficial they can be.  Growing up I can remember my mother slicing up cabbage and packing it in a huge crock Continue reading

Important News if You Have a Beer Belly

Beer bellies are even more dangerous than we thought.

While it’s long been known that men with excess fat around their abdomens are at elevated risk of high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, and other problems, new evidence has emerged that links the common condition to osteoporosis. Continue reading

Buttered Popcorn Flavoring Linked to Alzheimer’s

Story at-a-glance

  • Diacetyl is an artificial butter flavoring added to microwave popcorn and other snack foods; many microwave popcorn factories have already stopped using the synthetic diacetyl because it’s been linked to lung damage in people who work in the factories
  • New research shows diacetyl has several concerning properties for brain health and may trigger Alzheimer’s disease
  • Not only can diacetyl pass through the blood-brain barrier, which is intended to help keep toxins out of your brain, but it can also Continue reading

Super Spaghetti: The Pasta with Health Benefits

Into the annals of food cures steps a new innovation in the pasta department. Researchers have created pasta made with barley, which could significantly improve the health benefits of this Italian cuisine staple. Continue reading

Starting a Gluten-Free Diet

Getting started eating gluten-free may seem daunting. The typical American diet contains an overload of wheat, our main source of the problematic protein known as gluten. (The other sources are rye and barley.) But going gluten-free doesn’t have to be that difficult, doesn’t deprive you of wholesome, nutritious foods, and can be mastered with a little practice.

The first thing to keep in mind if you are avoiding gluten is that unprocessed meats, vegetables, fruits, rice and beans are all naturally gluten free. So if you enjoy an old-fashioned meal of meat, baked potato and veggies, a gluten-free diet won’t keep you from the foods you love.

On the other hand, there are some conventional, dietary mainstays that you have to give up. These include pretzels, pizza, bagels, rolls, hot dog buns, donuts and most breakfast cereals. The good news for those concerned with their nutrition: Most of the foods you have to stop eating are not very rich in nutrients. They’re merely heavy in starch and calories. Continue reading

Dark Ale Has more Iron than Pale Ale

Individuals who drink red wine for its polyphenol content, which has been associated with good heart health, may be interested to know that dark beers may also have some nutritional value.

In a study conducted by researchers at the University of Valladolid in Spain, it was found that dark beers — like stouts and porters — contain about 121 parts per billion (ppb) of iron, compared to 92 ppb in pale ales and 63 ppb in non-alcoholic beer.

“Although these quantities are very small, the differences are apparent and could be due to the production processes or raw materials used in manufacturing,” said co-author Carlos Blanco.

Beers with the highest iron content included Spanish varieties, found to have 165 ppb, and Mexican brews, with an estimated 130 ppb. Continue reading

Chronic Acid Reflux Can Lead to Cancer

If you want a real solution to acid reflux indigestion, don’t follow the conventional wisdom of conventional physicians. While drug companies and mainstream doctors maintain that acid reflux, acid indigestion and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) result from too much stomach acid, they’ve got the situation backwards: Reflux results from too little stomach acid, not too much.

Still, Big Pharma and its accomplices continue to sell us counter-productive prescription and over-the-counter antacids and prescription proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). In the long run, these alleged remedies worsen the situation.

Too Little Too Late

Acid reflux results from having too little hydrochloric acid (HCl), the “good” stomach acid. When the stomach does not produce enough HCl, foods cannot be digested properly. This causes indigestion, as food sits in the stomach far too long. The longer that food lingers, the more stomach acid is necessary to break it down. This stagnant situation leads to prolonged acid reflux.

Americans are in the habit of reaching for quick-relief tablets when experiencing pain and illness. In the case of acid indigestion, Continue reading

New Discovery Can Keep Beer Stay Fresh Longer

Researchers are reporting discovery of a scientific basis for extending the shelf life of beer so that it stays fresh and tastes good longer. For the first time, they identified the main substances that cause the bitter, harsh aftertaste of aged beer and suggest that preventing the formation of these substances could help extend its freshness. Their findings appear in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Thomas Hofmann and colleagues point out that beer can develop an unpleasant, bitter aftertaste as it ages. Unlike wine, scotch whiskey, and bourbon, beer tastes best when consumed fresh. Experts estimate that the average beer goes bad after 6 to 12 months of storage. Scientists have identified several dozens of the key bitter-tasting substances formed during beer manufacturing – mostly so-called “prenylated polyketides” derived from hops. Until now, however, nobody had solid information about the bitter substances that form as beer ages.

The scientists analyzed a variety of commercial beers both before and after storage. They identified 56 substances that contribute to beer’s bitter taste, including five that appear  Continue reading

Natural Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal

Some people are prone to become alcoholics at the first drink. For others, it takes time to become dependent upon alcohol. Either way, the only way to become dependent upon alcohol is to drink. There is no other way.

Alcohol Withdrawal Remedies

Nobody ever plans to get hooked on alcohol…and remember alcohol is alcohol…beer, wine, whiskey… it’s all the same…. Binge drinking is the most severe sign of alcoholism. People may use the excuse of it being Super Bowl, or a wedding, or Christmas, or whatever, but it’s still binge drinking. Black outs are more common during this time. A black out (loss of memory of events during drinking) is proof positive that the person has crossed over from casual drinking into full-blown alcoholism. Continue reading

Which Diet Makes You Happy?

SYDNEY – In the ongoing debate about which diet is the best, here’s a question you may not have heard before: Which diet is most likely to make you happy?

A new study, surprisingly, indicates that when it comes to elevating your mood, not all diets are created equal.

Grant Brinkworth of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization-Food and Nutritional Sciences in Adelaide, Australia, and colleagues studied 106 overweight and obese subjects. Fifty-five of them were put on low-carb, high-fat diets, and 51 were put on a high-carb, low-fat diets.

After a year, both groups had lost about the same amount of weight–an average of about 30 pounds per person. Both groups also scored about the same on tests that measure general thinking abilities. And both groups reported feeling an improvement in mood after the first eight weeks.

But only those on the low-fat diet continued to feel better after that. The moods of those on the high-fat diet fell back to where they were before their diets, the researchers reported in the Nov. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The findings suggest that something about the low-carb diet negates the positive effects of losing weight on mood. They’re not sure what that might be. They speculate that it’s just too difficult to eat a low-carb diet in a culture full of pasta and bread. But maybe there is something about the effects of protein and fat on brain chemicals such as serotonin.

Sudoku Can Make You Fat

QUEBEC – Filling in a Sudoku grid or doing a crossword can make you fat, claims a new study.

The study conducted by Canadian researchers, reported in the journal Psychology and Health, claims that any person who taxes his or her brain on word games uses up energy needed to exercise.

To reach the conclusion, two groups of volunteers were sent for evening gym exercises for eight weeks but one were set a series of mental tests needing concentration by day, reports The Daily Express.

They did not exercise as hard, said Professor Kathleen Martin Ginis.

She added: “They were more likely to skip their exercise ­sessions. You only have so much willpower.”

The professor said: “Willpower is like a muscle. It needs to be ­challenged to build itself.”

White Wine, Beer Can Ruin Appetite

SYDNEY – Wine, developed as a substitute for water not fit for drinking, could have an unhealthy effect on your appetite.

“However, alcohol is a drug that is abused and the repercussion of alcohol abuse over a long time can seriously affect most of the major organs of the body,” says Anna Kokavec, psychologist at the La Trobe University.

Kokavec and colleague Simon Crowe, a professor, are finding out exactly how alcohol affects the body by focusing on the links between alcohol consumption and appetite.

Alcoholics often seek treatment in a highly malnourished condition, “an issue that can lead to health problems like Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (condition that can lead to forms of amnesia and hallucinations),” says Kokavec.

This malnourishment was often attributed to the ‘poor dietary habits’ of alcoholics, but now Kokavec has uncovered another reason to explain malnourishment in heavy drinkers and the results speak for themselves, according to a La Trobe release.

“We confirmed that certain biochemical processes associated with appetite regulation do change when alcohol was consumed,” says Kokavec.

“The research provides enough evidence to question whether malnutrition and poor dietary behaviour of alcoholics is the fault of the individual or whether it’s the consequences of alcohol and the role it plays in suppressing appetite,” says Kokavec.