More on the Biggest Health Concern Facing Men

prostate2The prostate causes a number of major health concerns for men as they age. If you or your loved one hasn’t been to the doctor since childhood, there’s a good chance you want to get a prostate examination.

Prostate health becomes a focal point of concern after age 40. More than 30 million men suffer from some sort of prostate problem that can greatly affect their quality of life. The three areas of most concern are Continue reading

Drinking Iced Tea Raises Kidney Stone Risk: Study

Kidney stones affect about 10 percent of the U.S. population, researchers say

People who drink iced tea may be putting themselves at greater risk for developing painful kidney stones, a new study indicates.

Researchers from Loyola University Medical Center explained that the popular summertime drink contains high levels of oxalate, a chemical that leads to the formation of small crystals made of minerals and salt found in urine. Although these crystals are usually harmless, the researchers cautioned they can grow large enough to become lodged in Continue reading

Chinese Medicine Diagnosis: How an Interview Could Change Your Health

We arrive at the final part of this look at how Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners come to understand what ails you. It is essentially: the interview. The questions and answers are vital to arriving at a diagnosis, a true one, and then treating the underlying cause of the problem.

The interview is extensive, Continue reading

How Chinese Face Reading Reveals the State of Your Health

cfThe state of your overall health may be as simple to discern as using Chinese face reading to examine your face. So say ancient healing systems such as Ayurveda and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).

Face reading (mien shiang or mien xiang, pronounced “myen-shung”) originated in China nearly 3,000 years ago. Originally, this medical art was practiced by Taoist monk healers. Today, Eastern practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Continue reading

Extra Treatment during Prolapse Repair Reduces Incontinence Rate

Complications also more common in treated group, results of NIH study show

Surgery to repair pelvic organ prolapse often carries a risk of incontinence. To avoid scheduling a second surgery, some women may opt to have a second procedure to reduce incontinence at the time of their prolapse repair surgery.

A study fund Continue reading

Controlling a Troublesome Bladder

Loss of bladder control is so common that studies have suggested that as many as four in 10 people get one case of urinary incontinence a year — and 14% get it every day. Up to 20 million Americans suffer from incontinence; roughly 75% are women. Control over your bladder can slip just like vision starts to fade or your movement starts to slow. This story addresses this common issue and offers some natural remedies.

The three main types of urinary incontinence are urge, stress, and mixed. Those with urge incontinence have an overactive bladder and feel a sudden urge to urinate. (Bed-wetting is common, as the urge can strike every two hours.) Stress incontinence occurs when stress or pressure is put on the abdomen, such as with laughing, coughing, sneezing, and rising out of a chair. Continue reading

Most People Can’t Find Their Hearts

Communicating with a doctor can be difficult since doctor’s appointments are often rushed and end quickly. And now researchers have uncovered another difficulty: Patients are illiterate when it comes to anatomy and don’t know where their organs are located. Most of them can’t even locate their hearts.

In research published in the open access journal BMC Family Practice, it was demonstrated that 54.5 percent of people cannot correctly identify where the heart is in the body. Although about 86 percent of people can tell you where the intestines are and 81 percent know where the bladder is found, about 69 percent can’t even identify the position of the lungs.

The researchers point out that doctor-patient communication becomes even more challenging when patients can’t discuss their bodies knowledgeably with their healthcare practitioner.

Oh, and in case someone asks, the heart is in the middle of the chest, just behind and slightly left of the breastbone (your left!), and located between the two lungs.

Source for Story: Continue reading

5 Ways Menopause Sabotages Sleep

Want to know one of the most telling signs that you’re nearing or in the midst of menopause? The concept of eight hours of uninterrupted sleep sounds as precious — and as out of reach — as fitting into the jeans you wore in high school. According to a comprehensive report on menopause and sleep by the National Sleep Foundation, 61 percent of women between 45 and 60 say they suffer from sleeplessness and other sleep problems. Adding insult to injury, most women don’t consider this problem serious enough to seek treatment. In fact, in a separate survey of women suffering from menopause-related sleep problems, 62 percent said they hadn’t talked to a healthcare professional about their symptoms.

Yet recent research shows that poor sleep and lack of sleep raise your risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, weight gain, and immune system dysfunction. It’s time to get some help! Continue reading

Study Claims Fiber-Rich Diet Linked to Longevity

People who consumed higher amounts of fiber, particularly from grains, had a significantly lower risk of dying over a nine-year period compared to those who consumed lower amounts of fiber, a new National Institutes of Health study claims.

Fiber, found in whole grains, beans, nuts, vegetables and fruits aids the body with bowel movements, lowers blood-cholesterol levels and improves blood glucose levels, Dow Jones Newswires reported.

Other studies have suggested that fiber may lower the risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers, but there has been conflicting evidence on whether there is any mortality benefit from consuming fiber. Continue reading

Do You Have A Bashful Bladder?

If you think this only affects awkward teenagers you’re wrong. There are men of all ages who will stand in a public toilet with a full bladder, only to find they’re unable to urinate. They might not even be feeling self-conscious at the time.

There’s a theroy that the problem has its roots in our primitive history and that we’re still inclined to think “I can pee in Ugg’s presence, therefore I can challenge him to a fight, intimidate him with terrifying roars, bared yellow teeth and thumping of my hairy chest.” Perhaps so, but that doesn’t help get the pee from the bladder to the bowl.

You have a few options. Clenching and unclenching your pelvic floor muscles may help trigger the flow or urine. If not, you can try teaching yourself to pee around other people by degrees. Start by standing in a cubicle with the door closed, progress to keeping the door open, then to standing at the urinal furthest from anyone else, and eventually to peeing happily while singing “Old Man River”.

One doctor advised doing mental calculations, which apparently stimulates the cortex of the brain, interrupting the stream of messages it’s sending your nether regions. If all else fails, a behavioral therapist ought to be able to help.