Why Vegetable Oils Are Carcinogenic

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Replacing dangerous vegetable oils such as corn oil, soybean oil and canola oil with healthy fats such as lard, butter or coconut oil is a simple way to boost your health and reduce your risk of chronic disease, including cancer
  • Vegetable oils are a concentrated source of omega-6 linoleic acid, which has led to a severe imbalance between the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio in most people’s diets. This imbalance appears to be why vegetable oils promote cancer
  • Consumption of saturated animal fats such as butter, lard and beef tallow fell by 27% between 1970 and 2014, while consumption of vegetable oils rose by 87%
  • Historically, mankind consumed omega-3 and omega-6 at a ratio of 1-to-1. Today, most get 25 times more omega-6 than omega-3, and this imbalance has been linked to heart disease, gastrointestinal diseases, inflammatory conditions and cancer, especially neuroblastoma, breast, prostate, colon and lung cancer
  • Your body metabolizes omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs into eicosanoids (hormone-like substances), and as a general rule, omega-3 eicosanoids are anti-inflammatory while omega-6 eicosanoids have proinflammatory effects. Part of the benefits of omega-3 fats is that they block the proinflammatory effects of omega-6 eicosanoids

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Grape Seed Extract Eliminates Cancer Cell

Did You Know…

… grape seed oil can cure seemingly hopeless cases of cancer?

Discovering a chemotherapy treatment capable of selectively eliminating cancer cells would be a cancer researcher’s equivalent of finding the Holy Grail.  Continue reading

Add Acerola to your Diet

Did You Know…

… that the acerola fruit can help you lose weight, protect against cancer and heart disease, and boost your immune system with more vitamin C power than an orange?

Similar in appearance to a red cherry, the acerola fruit originates from Mexico and from Central and South America.  Continue reading

Sun Exposure Lowers Cancer Risk

 A study that correlated exposure to sunlight with cancer risk found that people exposed to more sunlight had a significantly lower risk of many types of cancer (Lin, 2012). This study followed more than 450,000 white, non-Hispanic subjects aged 50-71 years from diverse geographic areas in the US. Researchers correlated the calculated ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure in these different areas with the incidence of a variety of cancers. The diverse sites included six states Continue reading

Cancer Death Rates Continue to Decline

Deaths rates from cancer dropped 1.8 percent per year in men and 1.6 percent per year in women between 2004 and 2008, according to a new report — a promising trend that experts hope will accelerate in the years to come.

“This is really very exciting,” said report co-author Ahmedin Jemal of the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society. “Of course, the decrease is due to improvements in cancer prevention, early detection and treatment.”

Over the past 18 years, the steady drop in cancer death rates has translated into more than a million deaths averted, according to the report. Continue reading

Sulforaphane Found in Cruciferous Vegetables Targets Cancer Cells

Research details published in the Molecular Nutrition & Food Research journal explains the potent mechanism exhibited by cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower to ameliorate developing cancer cells. The active photochemical known as sulforaphane targets prostate and other hormone dependent cancer lines and leaves normal healthy cells unaffected. Cruciferous vegetables have long been associated with a lowered risk of prostate cancer, but this is the first study to demonstrate the `search and attack` capability of the natural chemical compound. Consuming small amounts of crucifers several times each week can help to significantly lower your risk of developing many types of potentially deadly cancer lines.

The study was led by Dr. Emily Ho, associate professor from the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. Tissue from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower contain high levels of the powerful natural compound chemically known as glucosinolates. In the body glucosinolates are broken down into sulforaphane  Continue reading

Breast Tissue Feature Could Predict Woman’s Cancer Risk

ROCHESTER – Certain structural features within breast tissue can indicate a woman’s individual cancer risk, say Mayo Clinic researchers.

The findings appear in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

The study shows that acini (AS-ih-nye), the small milk-producing elements in breast lobules, can be counted in sample biopsies. The percentage of acini present per lobule at a given age indicates cancer risk.

“Aside from the predictors of heredity, there is no effective independent predictor of risk of breast cancer,” says Lynn Hartmann, M.D., Mayo Clinic oncologist and senior author of the study.

“This risk estimate model based on novel tissue in each individual may provide a reliable strategy,” the expert added.

To reach the conclusion, researchers studied the tissue structures in 85 patients with breast cancer and examined earlier, noncancerous breast biopsies from the same women. They compared them to 142 age-controlled samples from Mayo’s Benign Breast Disease Cohort, a bio repository of benign biopsy tissues. Then, researchers developed the model and tested a risk prediction for each patient.

For the same women, they used the existing Gail model to make five-year risk predictions for the same women. While helpful in determining increased risk in groups of women, the Gail model is only slightly better than a guess when it comes to predicting cancer for an individual, the researchers say.

“Women who were more likely to develop breast cancer had larger lobules with more acini,” explains Dr. Hartmann.

As women age, especially as they approach menopause, the risk of breast cancer declines because the lobules and acini disappear. This natural process, called involution, is at the core of this risk factor.

Dr. Hartmann says if the lobules aren’t largely gone by the time a woman is 55, her risk of breast cancer triples. By looking closely at the structures in a large sample of benign tissues, the researchers were able to note standard measurements for lobule size and number of acini in the lobules.

This twofold approach led to development of accurate metrics on which to base individual risk. The team hopes this new model, combined with other patient information and assessments, will greatly improve a physician’s ability to predict cancer risk for individual patients.

Breast Milk Best if Consumed as Soon as it is Expressed

MADRID – Breast milk should be given to a baby at the same time of day it is expressed, a new study has said.

The levels of the components in breast milk change every 24 hours in response to the needs of the baby. And a new study published in the journal Nutritional Neuroscience shows, for example, how this milk could help newborn babies to sleep.

Breast milk contains various ingredients, such as nucleotides, which perform a very important role in regulating babies’ sleep. The new study confirms that the composition of breast milk changes quite markedly throughout the day.

To reach the conclusion, scientists looked for three nucleotides in breast milk (adenosine, guanosine and uridine), which excite or relax the central nervous system, promoting restfulness and sleep, and observed how these varied throughout a 24-hour period.

The milk, collected from 30 women living in Extremadura, was expressed over a 24-hour period, with six to eight daily samples. The highest nucleotide concentrations were found in the night-time samples (8pm to 8am).

“This made us realise that milk induces sleep in babies”, Cristina L. Sanchez, lead author of the article and a researcher at the Chrononutrition Laboratory at the University of Extremadura, tells SINC.

“You wouldn’t give anyone a coffee at night, and the same is true of milk – it has day-specific ingredients that stimulate activity in the infant, and other night-time components that help the baby to rest”, explains Sanchez.

In order to ensure correct nutrition, the baby should be given milk at the same time of day that it was expressed from the mother’s breast.

“It is a mistake for the mother to express the milk at a certain time and then store it and feed it to the baby at a different time”, points out the researcher.

More Women Opting to Remove Healthy Breast After Cancer Diagnosis

BUFFALO – The number of women going for surgery to remove the healthy breast after cancer diagnosis in one breast, according to a new study of New York State data.

And this was despite a lack of evidence that the surgery can improve survival.

The study also found that despite extensive press coverage of women who choose to have both breasts removed because of a strong family history of cancer, the rate of this surgery is relatively low and has changed little in the last decade.

Prophylactic mastectomy, the removal of a non-cancerous breast, is one method for reducing a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer.

But not much is known about the prevalence of prophylactic mastectomies for preventing breast cancer among high-risk women or on the prevalence of the surgery to prevent tumours in the healthy breast among women whose cancer is limited to one breast.

Led by Dr. Stephen B. Edge, at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, the researchers examined the frequency of prophylactic mastectomies in New York State between 1995 and 2005 using mandated state-wide hospital discharge data combined with data from the state cancer registry.

They identified 6,275 female New York residents who underwent prophylactic mastectomies.

It was found that 81 percent of the women had been diagnosed with cancer in one breast, while 19 percent had no personal history of breast cancer.

The researchers found that the number of prophylactic mastectomies increased during the time period, particularly among women with cancer in one breast.

Over the 11-year study period, the prevalence of these contralateral mastectomies more than doubled.

The prevalence of bilateral prophylactic mastectomies among women with no personal history of breast cancer increased only slightly.

“These data from New York are the only data on a large population of women that examine the use of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy,” said Edge.

“These data demonstrate that prophylactic mastectomy is an uncommon procedure that is performed most commonly on women with a personal history of breast cancer. Although the total number of prophylactic mastectomies performed per year was small, it appears that the use of the surgery is increasing,” he added.

He also advised that women with breast cancer should have careful counselling regarding benefits and risks before proceeding with prophylactic mastectomy of the other breast.

The study has been published in the journal Cancer.