Regenerative Fitness with Hamad Shirazi

What is Regenerative Fitness?

Regenerative fitness is a foundational program that will empower you with simple tools and practices that can be applied to instantly improve health and vitality. Using movement as medicine, we will cultivate an optimal environment for our bodies to harmonize and create a more youthful presence. This movement-centered program will include principles of infant development and natural movement patterns, all with the intention of total body integration. Continue reading

The Everything Kriya: Sat Kriya

If I could teach only one yoga exercise—one that had to last you for the rest of your life—it would have to be Sat Kriya.* Why? Because this one exercise contains just about all the benefits of Kundalini Yoga within itself. Sat Kriya is designed to do the one thing from which all well-being springs: raise the kundalini energy.

Here is simple and effective Sat Kriya. It is by no means the last word on Sat Kriya; but beyond words, it works. Continue reading

What Your Breath Reveals

Each Patient Has a Unique Breath ‘Fingerprint’ That Doctors Could Use to Diagnose

It’s the ultimate noninvasive medical test: A growing number of health problems can be diagnosed by analyzing a patient’s breath alone.

The concept goes back Continue reading

Detox with Oil Pulling

Did You Know…

the latest popular “detox” remedy is actually a centuries-old medical treatment?

According to popular diet and lifestyle blog, Well+Good, New York City trendsetters are Continue reading

The Power of Breath Comes from Breathing Correctly

Yoga, deep breathing and meditation continue to make strides in the healthcare industry.

More specifically, deep breathing is now widely recognized for its “profound impact on our physiology and our health,” says Mladen Golubic, a physician in the Cleveland Clinic`s Center for Integrative Medicine. Yet, the power of breath is still an unknown in our culture and within mainstream medicine.

Yogis understood the power of breath. In fact, postures (asana) were created to strengthen the body to sit for breathing (pranayama) and meditation. The breath is the most important aspect of the yoga tradition and one of the most important functions of the body in maintaining health.

The average American has 21,600 breaths every 24 hours (15 breaths per min X 60 min X 24 hours). The breathing process is the foundation of all brain function and 12 energy systems of the body. The respiratory system feeds our cardiovascular system and supports our digestive and lymphatic systems: two systems paramount to processing food and the removal of toxins and imbalances from the body. Breathing is also the only physiological function that can be controlled. Otherwise, it occurs involuntarily from the intelligence of the autonomic nervous system. Continue reading

Coffee Extract Prevents Bad Breath

We all know why Starbucks puts boxes of breath mints close to the cash register. Your morning latte can create a startling aroma in your mouth, strong enough to startle your co-workers too.

But intriguing new research from Tel Aviv University by breath specialist Prof. Mel Rosenberg finds that a coffee extract can inhibit the bacteria that lead to bad breath. New laboratory tests have shown that the extract prevents malodorous bacteria from making their presence felt ― or smelt.

“Everybody thinks that coffee causes bad breath,” says Prof. Rosenberg, “and it’s often true, because coffee, which has a dehydrating effect in the mouth, becomes potent when mixed with milk, and can ferment into smelly substances.”

But not always: “Contrary to our expectations, we found some components in coffee that actually inhibit bad breath,” explains Prof. Rosenberg. The findings were presented last month to members of the International Society for Breath Odor Research in Germany by Yael Gov, a researcher in Prof. Rosenberg’s laboratory

A “taster’s choice” for stopping bad bacteria
In the laboratory, the team monitored the bacterial odor production of coffee in saliva. In the study, three different brands of coffee were tested: the Israeli brand Elite coffee, Landwer Turkish coffee, and Taster’s Choice. Prof. Rosenberg expected to demonstrate the malodor-causing effect of coffee in an in vitro saliva evaluation developed by Dr. Sarit Levitan in his laboratory. To his surprise, the extracts had the opposite effect.

“The lesson we learned here is one of humility,” says Prof. Rosenberg. “We expected coffee would cause bad breath, but there is something inside this magic brew that has the opposite effect.”

Prof. Rosenberg would love to isolate the bacterial-inhibiting molecule in order to reap the biggest anti-bacterial benefits from coffee. “It’s not the raw extract we will use,” he says, “but an active material within it.” His latest discovery could be the foundation for an entirely new class of mouthwash, breath mints and gum. Purified coffee extract can be added to a breath mint to stop bacteria from forming, stopping bad breath at its source, instead of masking the smell with a mint flavor.

Prof. Rosenberg previously developed a popular mouthwash sold widely in Europe, a pocket-based breath test, and an anti-odor chewing gum.