When You Lose Weight, Where Does the Lost Fat Go?

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When you lose weight, you exhale 84 percent of the lost fat in the form of carbon dioxide. The remaining 16 percent is excreted as water via bodily fluids

By substituting one hour of sedentary lounging Continue reading

Are Polar Bear Plunges Good for You?

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  • Polar bear plunges, which involve taking a dip in the ocean in the winter, are said to invigorate and energize, but they can also generate an enormous shock to your system
  • You should be in relatively good shape if you take a polar bear plunge; for those at risk of stroke, aneurysm, blood pressure problems, or heart disease, the extra stress on your body can be especially dangerous, increasing your risk of heart attack
  • Even among healthy people, Continue reading

New Revelations Support Diet and Exercise to Reverse Leptin Resistance, Thereby Promoting a Healthy Weight

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  • Leptin is a powerful and influential hormone produced by your fat cells. It plays a key role in regulating energy intake and energy expenditure. By acquiring a better understanding of how leptin and its receptor interact, researchers now believe they will be able to find new treatments for obesity and other metabolic disorders
  • Drug treatments are not likely to solve leptin resistance, Continue reading

Brown Fat Measured by Thermal Imaging

Heat-seeking cameras could be used to measure people’s “good fat” and determine which foods they ought to be avoiding, scientists claim. Continue reading

Why Narcoleptics Get Fat

People with narcolepsy are not only excessively sleepy, but they are also prone to gaining weight. In fact, narcoleptic patients will often pack on pounds even as they eat considerably less than your average person.

Now researchers reporting in the October issue of Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication, appear to have an answer as to why. It seems a deficiency of the neuropeptide hormone orexin, an ingredient that encourages hunger and wakefulness, may leave them with a lack of energy-burning brown fat.

The findings may lead to orexin-based weight loss therapies for those with narcolepsy Continue reading

Good Fat Most Prevalent in Thin Children

Study at Joslin Diabetes Center and Children’s Hospital Boston Finds Boosting Brown Fat Levels May Combat Obesity Epidemic

Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center and Children’s Hospital Boston have shown that a type of “good” fat known as brown fat occurs in varying amounts in children – increasing until puberty and then declining — and is most active in leaner children.

The study used PET imaging data to document children’s amounts and activity of brown fat, which, unlike white fat, burns energy instead of storing it. Results were published in The Journal of Pediatrics.

“Increasing the amount of brown fat in children may be an effective approach at combating the ever increasing rate of obesity and diabetes in children,” said Aaron Cypess, MD, PhD, an assistant investigator and staff physician at Joslin and senior author of the paper. Continue reading