Synchronizing Your Body Clocks May Help Shed Excess Weight and Prevent Insulin Resistance

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You have circadian clocks in virtually every organ of your bodies, including your fat cells, and you need regular sleeping and eating schedules to keep all of your

 Lack of sleep promotes metabolic dysfunction; losing as little as 30 minutes of sleep each night can Continue reading

To Sleep Better, Spend More Time in the Dark

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Virtually every organ in your body has its own circadian clock, and to keep them all in sync, you need to keep a regular waking and sleeping schedule that is linked to the rising and setting of the sun Continue reading

Does a Pepper a Day Keep Parkinson’s Away?

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Eating peppers – but not other vegetables in the Solanaceae family — was associated with a 19 percent lower risk of Parkinson’s disease in a new study

The association was strongest among those who Continue reading

More Coffee May Lead To A Longer Life

More Coffee May Lead To A Longer LifeTired of apologizing for your addiction to a morning mug (or two or three) of coffee? No more need for guilt – that java may be just what the doctor should order.

According to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine, older adults who drink coffee have a lower risk of Continue reading

The Drink That Could Shield Against Dementia

Alzheimer’s disease is sure making the health news rounds lately. What’s promising about this scary illness is how much we are able to help shield our minds from it. A brand new health breakthrough proposes that coffee could help older adults avoid dementia.

A new study Continue reading

Surprisingly Healthy Foods

Although the best diets contain a large amount of vegetarian, raw foods, several commonly eaten foods have remarkably robust health benefits. Even if your busy life makes it hard to eat right, simply adding chocolate, coffee and orange juice to your menus can offer a distinct boost to your well-being.

Chocolaty Health

I’ve heard and laughed at the health claims for chocolate over the years. The chocolate you buy and eat has been processed and formulated with refined sugar. However, even though many of the potent antioxidant flavonoids in raw cacao (the original source of chocolate) are depleted, the processed chocolate you buy still shows clear health benefits.

The August 2011 British Medical Journal includes a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and observational studies with a total of 114,009 participants that demonstrated a 37 percent reduction in cardiovascular disease and a 29 percent reduction in stroke for people who consumed the highest levels of chocolate compared to those who consumed the least.1 Continue reading

10 Tips to Prevent a Painful Gallbladder Attack

Sometimes one of the compounds in bile — usually cholesterol — becomes so saturated that it forms a solid. This is called a gallstone. It is estimated that as many as one in 10 people have gallstones, though they might not know it. Gallstones may not necessarily cause you any problems, but sometimes when one is pushed out of the gallbladder, it gets stuck in your bile duct. This can cause a lot of pain and is what is known as a gallbladder attack.

Nobody wants to have a gallbladder attack. The best natural health advice is to avoid having one in the first place. With that in mind, here are 10 tips for avoiding stomach problems and painful attacks.

1. Get your doctor’s advice about testing for food allergies. Eliminate any food allergens you might have, such as dairy (milk, cheese, and ice cream), wheat (gluten), soy, corn, preservatives, and chemical food additives. Eggs, especially, Continue reading

Coffee Consumption Reduces Fibrosis Risk in those with Fatty Liver Disease

Increased coffee intake significantly decreases risk in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis patients

Caffeine consumption has long been associated with decreased risk of liver disease and reduced fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. Now, newly published research confirms that coffee caffeine consumption reduces the risk of advanced fibrosis in those with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Findings published in the February issue of Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that increased coffee intake, specifically among patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), decreases risk of hepatic fibrosis. Continue reading

Drinking This Could Protect You against Cancer

A huge piece of health news has added further weight to the argument that coffee may be a food cure. Researchers found that caffeine could be at the heart of a reduced risk for basal cell carcinoma risk due to consumption of coffee.

The prospective study examined the risks of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma in connection with coffee consumption and found a decreased risk for basal cell carcinoma only.

There are nearly one million new cases of basal cell carcinoma diagnosed each year in the United States. Small dietary factors that could help protect against it can have great public health impact. In this case, it’s java. Continue reading

How to Choose Mycotoxin-Free Coffee

Mycotoxins are dangerous substances that are often found in coffee. Despite this fact, coffee has been shown to improve health, help enhance performance, and keep your mind focused. So, how can you continue to drink coffee without ingesting the harmful mycotoxins? By being very selective about the kind of coffee that you drink.

Why Are Mycotoxins so Bad?

A form of fungus, mycotoxins make their way into coffee by adhering to dried coffee beans. Once the mycotoxins have latched onto the dried coffee beans, they are incorporated into the process of grinding and roasting them down and, eventually, may end up in your cup.

Fungus is not something Continue reading

Taking the Burn Out of Heartburn Naturally

According to the National Institute of Health, approximately 25 million Americans are suffering from heartburn each year. With such a large number of the population afflicted with this painful and potentially dangerous health problem, chances are that you are represented in this statistic. Over the past decade pharmaceutical companies have lead us to believe that the cause of this heartburn epidemic is an overproduction of stomach acid and doctors are writing millions of “acid blocker” prescriptions each year aimed at easing the symptoms of acid reflux. Ironically however, low stomach acid levels, not excessive levels, may very well be causing your heartburn. And furthermore, the very act of “blocking” your stomach acid production can have disastrous consequences for your health down the road.

Acid reflux is often incorrectly thought of as a stomach acid disease, but actually it is the result of a malfunctioning muscle called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The LES is a flap that separates the base of the esophagus from the top of the stomach and opens only to allow food and liquids to pass down or vomit or gas to pass up. When the LES is functioning properly it will remain closed at all other times, sealing off the esophagus from the harmful acids in the stomach. When the LES is malfunctioning however, the corrosive stomach acids are able to make their way into the esophagus where they burn  Continue reading

Control Overactive Bladder with 10 Foods you Need to Avoid

Decreasing fluids is often the first thing tried by someone seeking to control an overactive bladder. After all, if you drink less overall, you reduce the need to use the bathroom often or the chance of having an accident before you can get there.

Yes — but if you drink too little (fewer than about eight cups a day), urine becomes concentrated, which can cause even more bladder irritation. That’s why equally important to managing bladder problems is what you’re drinking and eating.

Whether you’re plagued by stress incontinence, prostate issues, urge incontinence, or some other form of overactive bladder syndrome (OBS), try eliminating some of the following foods and beverages. Keep a food diary to see if the change makes Continue reading

Sleep Tight Every Night

In addition to food, water, and air, sleep is the one thing we truly can’t live without. But experts say more and more women are falling short on shut-eye, and staring at the ceiling all night isn’t just frustrating—it can also be life threatening. Studies show that one in six fatal car accidents are caused by sleep-deprived drivers, and according to the National Sleep Foundation (NSF), the 40 million Americans who now suffer from sleep disorders are at higher risk for a slew of serious health issues. Here, what’s behind the insomnia epidemic, plus fast-acting solutions for getting quality sleep.

The Vitamin Z Deficiency Continue reading

Home Remedies Series – Insomnia

Although it’s common to have the occasional sleepless night, insomnia is the lack of sleep on a regular basis.

Before starting any natural remedies, consult your doctor. Chronic insomnia can itself be a symptom of another condition, such as depression, heart disease, sleep apnea, lung disease, hot flashes, or diabetes, so it’s important to see a doctor if you are having trouble sleeping.

Natural Remedies for Insomnia

Here are fourteen natural remedies that are used to treat insomnia.

1) Valerian

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) is a herb that has been long used as a remedy for insomnia. Today, it is an accepted over-the-counter insomnia remedy in Germany, France, Switzerland, Belgium, and Italy.

Exactly how valerian works in the body is still not well understood. Some studies suggest that like conventional sleeping pills, valerian may affect levels of the calming neurotransmitter GABA.

Unlike many other sleep medications, valerian is not believed to be addictive or cause grogginess in the morning. But valerian doesn’t work for everyone. And although studies in labs have been encouraging, clinical trials are still inconclusive.

Valerian is usually taken between an hour before bedtime. It takes about two to three weeks to work. It shouldn’t be used for more than three months at a time. Side effects of valerian may include mild indigestion, headache, palpitations, and dizziness. Although valerian tea and liquid extracts are available, most people don’t like the smell of valerian and prefer taking the capsule form.

Valerian shouldn’t be taken with many medications, especially those that depress the central nervous system, such as sedatives and antihistamines. Valerian shouldn’t be taken with alcohol, before or after surgery, or by people with liver disease. It should not be taken before driving or operating machinery. Consultation with a qualified health practitioner is recommended. For more information about valerian.

 Melatonin

Melatonin is a popular remedy to help people fall asleep when the sleep/wake cycle has been disturbed, such as in shift workers or people who with jet lag.

Melatonin is a hormone found naturally in the body. The pineal gland in the brain makes serotonin which is then converted into melatonin at night when exposure to light decreases.

Melatonin is typically taken about 30 minutes before the desired bedtime. Some experts caution that melatonin should not be used by people with depression, schizophrenia, autoimmune diseases, and other serious illness. Pregnant and nursing women should not use melatonin.

The University of Alberta study examined 17 studies with 651 people and found no significant side effects when used for three months or less. The long-term effect of melatonin supplementation is not known. For more information about melatonin, read

3) Kava

Kava is an anti-anxiety herb that may be helpful for anxiety-related insomnia. However, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an advisory to consumers about the potential risk of severe liver injury resulting from the use of dietary supplements containing kava. To date, there have been more than 25 reports of serious adverse effects from kava use in other countries, including four patients who required liver transplants. Learn more:

4) Relaxation Techniques

Relaxation techniques are one of the most effective ways to increase sleep time, fall asleep faster, and feel more rested in the morning. They require a minimum of 20 minutes before going to bed. There are many different techniques:

  Visualization involves imagining a relaxing scene. You can try it in bed before falling asleep. Involve all your senses. If you’re imagining yourself on a tropical island, think of the way the warm breeze feels against your skin. Imagine the sweet scent of the flowers, look at the water and listen the waves–you get the picture. The more vivid the visualization and the more senses you involve, the more effective it will be.

  Relaxation Response – A mind/body technique based on the principles of Transcendental Meditation.

  Mindfulness – A type of meditation that essentially involves focusing on your mind on the present.

  Yoga combines deep breathing, meditation, and stretching. A Harvard study found that daily yoga for eight weeks improved total sleep time, the time to fall asleep. If you’ve never tried yoga before, not to worry. There are many gentle yoga styles to choose from.

  Progressive Muscle Relaxation is a promising natural remedy for sleep. If you’ve never tried a relaxation technique before, this technique is easy to learn and simple to master.

5) Diet

  Cut out caffeine
Caffeine can have a pronounced effect on sleep, causing insomnia and restlessness. In addition to coffee, tea, and soft drinks, look for hidden sources of caffeine such as chocolate, cough and cold medicine, and other over-the-counter medicine.

  Avoid sweets
Although sugar can give a burst of energy, it’s short-lived and can cause uneven blood sugar levels. This can disrupt sleep in the middle of the night as blood sugar levels fall.

  Eat foods that help you sleep
Tryptophan is an amino acid that is a precursor to serotonin, which is then converted to melatonin. Carbohydrate snacks such whole grain crackers before bedtime may help to promote sleep. Just be sure to stay away from sweets.

  Eat magnesium-rich foods
Magnesium is a natural sedative. Deficiency of magnesium can result in difficulty sleeping, constipation, muscle tremors or cramps, anxiety, irritability, and pain. It has also been use for people with restless leg syndrome.

Foods rich in magnesium are legumes and seeds, dark leafy green vegetables, wheat bran, almonds, cashews, blackstrap molasses, brewer’s yeast, and whole grains.

6) Aromatherapy

The scent of English lavender has long been used as a folk remedy to help people fall asleep.

Research is starting to confirm lavender’s sedative qualities. It’s been found to lengthen total sleep time, increase deep sleep, and make people feel refreshed. It appears to work better for women, possibly because women tend to have a more acute sense of smell.

The good thing about lavender is that it begins to work quickly. Try putting a lavender sachet under your pillow or place one to two drops of lavender essential oil in a handkerchief. Or add several drops of lavender oil to a bath — the drop in body temperature after a warm bath also helps with sleep.

Other aromatherapy oils believed to help with sleep are chamomile and ylang ylang.

7) Light

If you have trouble falling asleep at night, you may need more light in the morning.

Light exposure plays a key role in telling the body when to go to sleep and when to wake up. Try taking a walk first thing in the morning. Just be sure to wear sunscreen to protect your skin from ultraviolet rays.

On the other hand, if you find you’re waking up too early in the morning, you may need more light in the afternoon. Try taking a walk in the late afternoon.

8) Music

Gentle, slow music is another remedy that can help to improve sleep without medication.

Music has been found to improve sleep quality, decrease nightly wakenings, lengthen sleep time, and increase satisfaction with sleep.

9) Acupuncture

Acupuncture may help with insomnia. A University of Pittsburgh analysis concluded that acupuncture may be an effective treatment for insomnia. A preliminary study found that five weeks of acupuncture increase melatonin secretion in the evening and improved total sleep time.

10) Traditional Chinese Medicine

In traditional Chinese medicine, insomnia often stems from kidney energy weakness. This syndrome is not necessarily related to kidney disease in Western medicine. A few signs of kidney energy weakness are low back ache, tiredness and fatigue, and a burst of energy at about 11 pm in the evening. Women in menopause often experience this type of insomnia. People who are taking anti-estrogenic drugs such as tamoxifen also experience this type of insomnia, however, they should not take herbal combinations such as the herbal formula liu wei di huang that may increase estrogen levels.

11) Ayurvedic Medicine

In Ayurvedic medicine, insomnia is often associated with a vata imbalance. Vata regulates breathing and circulation. People with a vata imbalance often notice irritability, anxiety, and fear with insomnia. One Ayurvedic treatment is the application of oil on the head and feet. For the pitta type, room temperature coconut oil is used, for the vata type, warm sesame oil is applied, and for the kapha type, warm mustard oil is often applied.

12) Exercise

Lack of exercise can contribute to poor sleep. Muscle tension and stress build in the body. Exercise can promote deep sleep that night. However, intense exercise too close to bed can increase adrenaline levels, leading to insomnia.

13) Other Natural Remedies

  • For hot flashes, a thin, flat foam pillow insert, called a Chillow, can help to cool the head throughout the night.
  • Chamomile, hops, passionflower, lemon balm, and ashwagandha are other herbs that are often used for insomnia. Some people may find benefit from simply having a cup of chamomile tea one to two hours before going to bed. Chamomile can reduce anxiety, calm the digestive system, and relieve muscle tension.

14) Feng Shui

Feng shui, which originates in the Chinese philosophy of Taoism, instructs on how to arrange rooms, furniture, offices, houses, and other arrangements to maximize favorable energy flow throughout living spaces. Here are some recommendations that may help promote relaxing sleep:

  • Try not to have the bed in a corner of the room. The corners are where energy tends to be stagnant.
  • Avoid putting your bed next to a window. Energy can be drained this way.
  • The bed shouldn’t be positioned so that the soles of the feet, when lying face-up in bed, directly face the doorway.
  • When lying in bed, you should have full view of anyone coming in the door. If you can’t do this directly, hang a mirror to reflect the entranceway.
  • Try to avoid facing sharp corners from desks, bookcases, and other pieces of furniture.