Healing the Heart in Body, Mind and Emotions

Integrative cardiology is a newer field in the larger scope of integrative medicine. It specializes in treating the heart from a body, mind and emotions perspective and in doing so; decreases the reliance upon using medication alone to help the function of the heart. Since most medications have an average of 70 side effects and some up to 525, Continue reading

Surprisingly Healthy Foods

Although the best diets contain a large amount of vegetarian, raw foods, several commonly eaten foods have remarkably robust health benefits. Even if your busy life makes it hard to eat right, simply adding chocolate, coffee and orange juice to your menus can offer a distinct boost to your well-being.

Chocolaty Health

I’ve heard and laughed at the health claims for chocolate over the years. The chocolate you buy and eat has been processed and formulated with refined sugar. However, even though many of the potent antioxidant flavonoids in raw cacao (the original source of chocolate) are depleted, the processed chocolate you buy still shows clear health benefits.

The August 2011 British Medical Journal includes a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and observational studies with a total of 114,009 participants that demonstrated a 37 percent reduction in cardiovascular disease and a 29 percent reduction in stroke for people who consumed the highest levels of chocolate compared to those who consumed the least.1 Continue reading

A Winter Danger you should be Aware of

There are the murmurings out there that shoveling snow can cause a heart attack. We’ve long thought that it happens every so often, but just in some incidences. Now the evidence points to men who have a family history of heart disease. It is they who should be cognizant about the risks that winter snow can bring…when it is on your driveway.

Two of the most important cardiology associations in the U.S. include snow-shoveling on their web sites as a high- risk physical activity. But the evidence didn’t seem convincing enough for a group of researchers. So they went to work.

They reviewed hospital patient records from the two previous winter seasons and came to this discovery: of 500 patients who came to the hospital with heart problems during this period, 35 of them (seven percent) had started experiencing symptoms while shoveling snow.

They call this a “huge” number. In fact, seven percent of anything in medicine is a significant proportion. What’s more is, perhaps they missed some patients that could have been shoveling snow around the time of a heart attack, but failed to mention it to the doctors. It is conceivable that the number of people could be double that.

The study also identified three main factors Continue reading