Your Body’s Master Defender Against Disease and Aging

Inside your cells this nutrient is without equal as an antioxidant — for its ability to neutralize toxins, boost immunity, fight disease and hold back the aging process. Continue reading

Cabbage Beats Chemo for Cervical Cancer

Mainstream medicine’s cancer treatments of radiation and chemotherapy are far from a cure.  In fact, they make cancer more deadly.  But new research shows some common vegetables may be more effective in battling cancer. Continue reading

The Worst Foods to Eat When You’re Sick, and the Best Ones

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If you feel yourself coming down with something like a cold or flu, avoid sugar, artificial sweeteners, and processed foods Continue reading

To Every Food there Is a Season, Color, Taste, Element – Your Organs Know This, Do You?

If your mother had x-ray vision and eyes on the back of her head that saw everything, it’s probably because her body’s innate intelligence knew she ate a lots of red foods whose properties nourish the eyes and vision. The practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) teaches the Five Element theory, where each element relates to a season, flavor, color, organ, bodily system Continue reading

Sulfur in Broccoli and other Cruciferous Vegetables May Hold the Key to Healing Genetic Diseases

Our mothers were right. Broccoli is good for us, but possibly in ways our mothers never knew. Health practitioners and fitness experts around the world have heralded the benefits of broccoli for decades. Scientists have long demonstrated the antioxidant properties of broccoli. Continue reading

Improving Your Genetic Health

The genes you inherit from your parents strongly affect your health and longevity. But you can influence your genes in a healthy fashion using the proper herbs, nutrition and lifestyle choices. Research shows that the natural chemicals in particular foods and botanicals send signals to DNA, optimizing cellular function and keeping illness at bay. Even positive emotions can help DNA yield better health. Continue reading

The Best Cooked Vegetable for Your Health

Do you ever wonder what impact cooking has on the nutrients in your food? After all, if your take the time to make a home-cooked meal, you’ll want to get all the health benefits you can. Here’s some health news that you’ll want to consider before you make that next meal: some cooking methods are more nutrient-friendly than others, according to Spanish researchers. Continue reading

Why it’s better to Eat Whole Foods for Your Health

Natural supplements are a great way to complement a healthful diet. Never should they be considered an adequate replacement for whole foods. A new study drives this home with a look at several foods, including broccoli. It shows why it’s just a bad idea to skip the broccoli in favor of popping a pill. Continue reading

Fruits and Vegetables Have Different Effects on Colon Cancer Risk

Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables has long been recommended to promote overall well-being and health. Researchers at the Western Australian Institute for Medical Research now believe that the types of produce consumed can affect a person’s risk of colorectal cancer in different ways, depending on the site of the carcinoma.

In a study, a team of scientists found that brassica vegetables — which include Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli and cabbage — may have a protective effect against distal and proximal colon cancer. However, apples were specifically associated with a lower risk of tumors of the distal colon, while fruit juice appeared to increase chances of rectal cancer. Continue reading

Sulforaphane Found in Cruciferous Vegetables Targets Cancer Cells

Research details published in the Molecular Nutrition & Food Research journal explains the potent mechanism exhibited by cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower to ameliorate developing cancer cells. The active photochemical known as sulforaphane targets prostate and other hormone dependent cancer lines and leaves normal healthy cells unaffected. Cruciferous vegetables have long been associated with a lowered risk of prostate cancer, but this is the first study to demonstrate the `search and attack` capability of the natural chemical compound. Consuming small amounts of crucifers several times each week can help to significantly lower your risk of developing many types of potentially deadly cancer lines.

The study was led by Dr. Emily Ho, associate professor from the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. Tissue from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower contain high levels of the powerful natural compound chemically known as glucosinolates. In the body glucosinolates are broken down into sulforaphane  Continue reading

Stay Healthy by Growing your Own Organic Fruits and Vegetables

Growing your own organic fruits and vegetables guarantees the freshest, best-tasting nutrient-rich food. Tending your organic garden also offers a very personal and spiritual experience.

One of the best ways to stay healthy year-round is to eat in the season thereof. This simply means that when certain foods are in season, you eat as much of them as you can and preserve the excess by canning, dehydrating and freezing.

Have you ever noticed that you crave seasonal fruits and vegetables? That is because our bodies need the nutrients we get from the different foods that are grown in those seasons.

If you don’t grow a garden, you can shop  Continue reading

Get 5 to 9 Fruit and Vegetable Servings Every Day

Here’s why: By now, you have probably heard that the new USDA recommendation for optimal health is to fill half of your plate with fruits and vegetables of all colors. Countless studies show that the fiber helps keep weight down and also that the different pigments in the skins of produce are powerful antioxidants that help the immune system function properly and prevent life-shortening diseases. The countries with the highest amount of centenarians eat very large portions of vegetables and consume almost none of our modern packaged foods. These centenarians live to a ripe old age in basically good health, suffering from very little heart and liver disease and showing very slight rates of cancer and degenerative diseases. Research supports this: compared with people who eat very small amounts of produce, those who eat larger amounts as part of a healthful diet are more likely to have reduced risk of stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, certain cancers, and many chronic conditions.

A few tips: Eat foods of all colors–red, yellow, green, white, Continue reading