Would You Like Some Salt With Your MS?

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You don’t need to hear about more high-salt diets causing weight gain, heart problems, and diabetes. You get it all the time. But there’s something you might not know: it can also make you more susceptible to autoimmune diseases, like multiple sclerosis, by impacting your body’s ability to fight infection. Continue reading

What You See in the Toilet Can Give You Valuable Insights into Your Health

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Story at-a-glance

  • What’s normal and what’s not when you look into the toilet after using it? You can learn a great deal about your overall health by taking a look at your stool and noting its color, size, shape, consistency, odor and other features
  • Your toileting habits, such as your frequency of elimination and the ease with which you move your bowels, can provide additional clues to your health status
  • If you know what to look for, you may be able to detect health problems early enough to stop them in their tracks, including serious diseases like celiac disease, Continue reading

Stinging Nettle Health Benefits for Home Remedies that Treat Just About Everything

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It may be a brash statement to say that one prickly green herb is the panacea for almost everything that ails you; but, in the case of stinging nettles, it’s mostly true. If there’s one plant to have on hand at all times that provides a cure for arthritis, an herbal treatment for allergies, relieves hair loss, treats Celiac disease, bleeding, bladder infections, skin complaints, neurological disorders and a long list of other conditions — it’s nettle leaf. Continue reading

Help Your Body Win the Battle against Autoimmune Disease

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We face an epidemic of autoimmune diseases, medical conditions that cause the body to attack itself and destroy its own tissues. Everyone who lives in today’s polluted world — exposed to toxins at home, outside and just about everywhere in the environment — is at risk. But you can take natural steps to regulate your immune system and help it ward off disease, not cause it. Continue reading

A Gluten-Free Diet May Promote Fertility in Women with Celiac Disease

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A study conducted by researchers at Columbia University’s Center for Women’s Reproductive Care reveals that celiac disease may be behind unexplained infertility in some women, and that a gluten-free diet can help. Continue reading

Gluten May Threaten Your Brain

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The future of the American brain looks murky. One in 10 children reportedly suffers Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and millions are taking ADHDmedication.1 At the same time, the memories of many older Americans have started to falter as they begin to experience the mind meltdown known as dementia. The possible common factor that may be driving a portion of this collective brain dysfunction: our boundless appetite for bread and other gluten-containing foods.

Continue reading

Gluten Weakens Bones

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Years ago, a bread company boasted that its product “builds strong bodies 12 ways.” But if you’ve got a gluten problem, bread may actually be destroying your body, not building it. In particular, it may be weakening your bones. And unless you stop eating gluten-containing foods (made from wheat, barley and rye), the deconstruction of your bones may continue until you suffer debilitating osteoporosis. Continue reading

Starting a Gluten-Free Diet

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Getting started eating gluten-free may seem daunting. The typical American diet contains an overload of wheat, our main source of the problematic protein known as gluten. (The other sources are rye and barley.) But going gluten-free doesn’t have to be that difficult, doesn’t deprive you of wholesome, nutritious foods, and can be mastered with a little practice.

The first thing to keep in mind if you are avoiding gluten is that unprocessed meats, vegetables, fruits, rice and beans are all naturally gluten free. So if you enjoy an old-fashioned meal of meat, baked potato and veggies, a gluten-free diet won’t keep you from the foods you love.

On the other hand, there are some conventional, dietary mainstays that you have to give up. These include pretzels, pizza, bagels, rolls, hot dog buns, donuts and most breakfast cereals. The good news for those concerned with their nutrition: Most of the foods you have to stop eating are not very rich in nutrients. They’re merely heavy in starch and calories. Continue reading

Five Hidden Causes of Digestive Trouble

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Sometimes, when trying to ascertain the state of your natural health, it takes understanding the hidden triggers of any symptoms you have. On that note, let’s take a peek at five hidden reasons you might be experiencing digestive problems.

1. Fructose Intolerance
This is a hereditary disorder in which your body cannot metabolize fructose (a sugar molecule), resulting in its build-up in the liver, kidneys, and intestines. It causes abdominal pain and vomiting. You might suspect there is a fructose problem should you experience these symptoms continually after eating foods that claim it as an ingredient. For a diagnosis, see your doctor. The cure here is to avoid fructose and steer clear of sucrose and sorbitol, two related sugars. Gather nutritional information to see which foods are safe. A small list of safe foods includes milk, eggs, most meat, poultry, fish, asparagus, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, green beans, green peppers, salad greens, potatoes, spaghetti, butter, margarine, olive oil, coffee & tea, vegetable juice, and soups.

2. Gallstones
As many as one in 12 Americans Continue reading

The Only Treatment for Celiac is a Lifelong Gluten Free Diet

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One or the most remarkable facts about celiac — the autoimmune reaction to the gluten in wheat, barley and rye — is the stunningly wide range of problems it can cause. The list of difficulties linked to celiac includes not only digestive discomfort but things like nerve damage, dementia, thyroid disorders, and diabetes and nutrient deficiencies. Celiac is a many-headed health monster.

Traditionally, the medical community has considered celiac to be a digestive disease. Symptoms like bloating, diarrhea, stomach pain and intestinal gas were believed to be the main signs that your body was experiencing physiological complications related to gluten. However, more recently, researchers have begun to recognize that gluten’s harmful effects are not always restricted to digestion. It is that fact that can make celiac such an insidious disease.

For example, if you began to unexpectedly suffer nerve damage and/or brain fog , chances are you wouldn’t initially suspect that the bread you eat every day might be the cause of your condition.  Continue reading

When Gluten is a Menace

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Can a piece of bread destroy your brain? Believe it or not, it’s possible if you have the condition called celiac. For some celiac sufferers, eating foods like bread that contain gluten (a protein found in wheat, barley and rye) causes an autoimmune reaction that destroys nerve tissue and brain cells. The main defense against this destruction: eating a gluten-free diet.

Deteriorating Memory

In 2007, I was on the brink of full-blown dementia, suffering very serious (and seemingly inexplicable) cognitive and memory difficulties. After taking part in a conversation in the morning, I would have no memory of it by the afternoon. Driving became increasingly difficult. Writing and editing? Fuhgeddaboutit. And when my son interrupted me one evening to ask why I was telling him a story I had just told him two minutes before (and which I had no memory of doing), I knew I was in serious trouble.

I couldn’t understand why a brain fog had enveloped me so unrelentingly.

Now, about a year before, without paying it too much attention, I had read about a study at the Mayo Clinic that found that folks with celiac who were suffering cognitive decline improved on a gluten-free diet. Continue reading

Today hybrid Versions of Grains Contain significantly more Gluten than Traditional Varieties

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Over the past decade, the frequency of conversations about gluten intolerance (GI) and celiac disease (CD) in the United States has gone from almost unheard of to commonplace. Chances are your local supermarket sells dozens of items labeled “gluten free” where none existed five years ago. Restaurants and school lunch programs frequently offer gluten-free alternatives. What happened?

“Gluten” is the general term for a mixture of tiny protein fragments (called polypeptides), which are found in cereal grains such as wheat, rye, barley, spelt, faro, and kamut. Gluten is classified in two groups: prolamines and glutelins. The most troublesome component of gluten is the prolamine gliadin. Gliadin is the cause of the painful inflammation in gluten intolerance and instigates Continue reading

Celiac Disease and Osteoporosis Link Brings Possible Treatment

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Celiac Disease and Osteoporosis Link Brings Possible Treatment

A new study indicates a startling reason that osteoporosis is a risk factor for celiac disease: The body’s immune system may attack its own bone tissue. It also holds promise for treatment.

Scientists previously speculated that the reason for the celiac-osteoporosis link was the body’s failure to absorb vitamin D and calcium, nutrients essential for healthy bones.

But researchers at the University of Edinburgh studied a protein called osteoprotegerin (OPG) in victims of celiac disease. OPG controls the rate that bone is removed and is vital in maintaining good bone health. They found that 20 percent of celiac patients produced antibodies that kept the OPG protein from working properly. The result is rapid destruction of bone and severe osteoporosis.

Although the scientists found that, even though this form of osteoporosis doesn’t respond to calcium and vitamin D supplement, it can be treated with drugs already available that prevent bone loss.

An intolerance to gluten, a protein found in wheat, causes celiac disease, which damages and inflames the small villi that line the small intestines and help in digestion. When inflamed, the villi can’t absorb food normally, which leads to diarrhea and malnutrition.

“This is a very exciting step forward,” said lead researcher Professor Stuart Ralston from the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine. “Not only have we discovered a new reason to explain why osteoporosis occurs in celiac disease, but we have also found that it responds very well to drugs that prevent bone tissue removal,” he told BBC News.

“Testing for these antibodies could make a real and important difference to the lives of people with celiac disease by alerting us to the risk of osteoporosis and helping us find the correct treatment for them.”

Bone Health Fact: Celiac Disease affects 1 in 100 people, and many of them will develop osteoporosis.