Some U.S. Farmers now Feeding their Cattle Gummy Worms, Marshmallows, and Ice Cream Sprinkles in Response to Skyrocketing Feed Costs

5
209023

The cost of genetically-modified (GM) corn and soy feed for conventional cattle is surging so high, and availability plunging so low, as a result of persistent drought conditions and resultant crop failures that conventional feedlot farmers are having to seek out less expensive and more plentiful alternatives. But such alternatives are not exactly the types of things you would Continue reading

Public-Interest Group Says Chemical in Soda Causes Cancer

0
209023

It has been one of the listed ingredients of Coke and Pepsi for as long as most people can remember but, if the Center for Science in the Public Interest, or CSPI, has its way, caramel color will no longer be used to make colas. Continue reading

Chlorine-Free Pool and Spa Care – Ensure the Health of your Family

0
209023

Private pools and spas have become a normal part of life for many individuals, especially those living in the warmer states. Pool care, then, has also become an important topic for many homeowners, as finding natural pool and spa treatments has been a challenge for many consumers. Chlorine-based products have become staples in the pool and spa care industry, but the fact remains that the use of this chemical raises questions about its safety. Chlorine-free pool and spa care products have been developed relatively recently, but the question as to whether or not they are better for your family’s health is one that should be considered more thoroughly.

Chlorine is a chemical that, like other chemicals, can have adverse effects on the body if encountered frequently or in large quantities. For many pool and spa owners, both of these cases apply. Continue reading

Drinking Filtered Water may be Healthier for You than Bottled Water

0
209023

Millions around the world purchase bottled water as a primary form of hydration. Many of these consumers are under the false impression that the bottled water they are consuming is safer than the toxin-laden tap water that is coming out of their household faucets. Unfortunately, bottled water is often just as bad, or even worse, than tap water in the United States and elsewhere. Research shows that this common misconception is the result of highly-effective mass advertising campaigns and marketing. Learn how to distinguish between safe and unsafe drinking water.

The typical cost of bottled water per gallon is around $3.79, while a typical cost of tap water is $0.002/gallon. Of course tap water is not a viable alternative to bottled water when it comes to improving one’s health, but why is bottled water so much more expensive when it is oftentimes just as contaminated? For a 1900% markup over tap water,  Continue reading

Overcome ADHD the Natural Way

2
209023

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently surveyed 73,000 children and found one in 10 has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This is a 22% increase since 2003. Research has shown that toxic and deficient lifestyle patterns are the chief contributing factor for this disorder. Natural lifestyle solutions can prevent and reverse ADHD.

Many researchers consider chronic ADHD symptoms a sign of mild-moderate brain damage. When regions of the brain are chronically inflamed it signals the primitive regions of the brain to be on overdrive. This inhibits frontal lobe function which is the region responsible for concentration and emotional stability. The primitive regions on overdrive include the reticular activating system and limbic system. When this primitive brain is imbalanced  Continue reading

Targeting Enzyme Could Reduce Breast Cancer Spread

2
209023

Blocking key chemical stops disease from attacking other organs

UK scientists have discovered that blocking the actions of a key chemical can stop the spread of breast cancer to other organs.

The chemical, an enzyme called lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), is needed for tumor cells to escape from the breast and invade surrounding tissues, allowing cancer cells to spread to other organs.

The spread of cancer is known as metastasis. Once breast cancer metastases are detected in a patient with breast cancer, the average survival is less than two years.

However, in laboratory models, scientists found that blocking the function of this enzyme decreased the spread of the cancer from the breast to the lungs, liver and bone.

The enzyme is thought to play a role in controlling the amounts of other molecules called TIMP1 and MMP9, which have previously been linked to the spread of cancer.

The findings pave the way for the development of drug designed to block the actions of the LOXL2 enzyme, which could be used to treat women with advanced breast cancer.

When the team from the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) looked at levels of the enzyme in tissue samples from breast cancer patients, they found that high levels were associated with cancer spread and poor survival rates. This means that LOLX2 levels could also be used to predict whether a woman’s breast cancer is likely to be of an aggressive type.

As LOXL2 has also been linked to the spread of other cancers including cancer of the colon and oesophagus and squamous cell cancers, the study has important implications for treating many cancer types, the scientists said.

Dr Janine Erler from the ICR, who led the study, said: “Around 12,000 women die from breast cancer in the UK each year, most because their cancer has spread to other parts of their body.

“Our study shows that inhibiting the action of LOXL2 can significantly reduce the spread of breast cancer, suggesting that drugs which block this enzyme may be effective in preventing patients’ cancer from spreading.”

Dr Julie Sharp, senior science information manager at Cancer Research UK, said: “Cancer spread is an important problem in breast and other cancers, and scientists are searching to find new ways to stop cancer spread and save many more lives.

“The team has shown that targeting the molecule LOXL2, which plays a key role in spread, could offer new approaches to tackle this problem.”

The findings are published in the journal Cancer Research.