Newtown School Shooter Needed Nutrition, not Drugs like Fanapt from Novartis

Adam Lanza, the mass murderer in the Newtown School shooting, reportedly took the pharmaceutical drug Fanapt, made by Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. According to the drug company’s literature, published on the packing insert, Fanapt is prescribed to treat schizophrenia in adults. Fanapt was approved Continue reading

‘Game-Changer’ in Evolution from S. African Bones

Two million-year-old bones belonging to a creature with both apelike and human traits provide the clearest evidence of evolution’s first major step toward modern humans — findings some are calling a potential game-changer.

An analysis of the bones found in South Africa suggests Australopithecus sediba is the most likely candidate to be the ancestor of humans, said lead researcher Lee R. Berger of the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa.

The fossils, belonging to a male child and an adult female, show a novel combination of features, almost as though nature were experimenting. Some resemble pre-human creatures while others suggest the genus Homo, which includes Homo sapiens, modern people.

“It’s as if evolution is caught in one vital moment, a stop-action snapshot of evolution in action,” said Richard Potts, director of the human origins program at the Smithsonian Institution. He was not among the team, led by South African scientists, whose research was published online Thursday in the journal Science. Continue reading

Use the Magic of Why to Get at the Root of your Health Issues

To many adults, that fact that young children insatiably ask, “Why?” over and over again can be maddening. But if you try that open-ended questioning technique on yourself to discover the roots of your health problems, you might be shocked at what you find. And a path to better health may open up before you.

Many children ask, “why?” again and again and again until the routine grows annoying. But children are still in their inherent genius stage and have not yet learned to inhibit their curiosity. So when a child incessantly asks, “Why?” he is authentically seeking to understand the deep root reason for things and the relationships that exist between the various causes and effects in a chain of circumstances.

Embracing the Why Continue reading

Fever is not Your Child’s Enemy but His Friend

It can be scary when your child’s forehead feels abnormally warm to the touch. So it’s only natural for parents to stress over how to treat a fever in their child. But your impulse to bring that fever down immediately with ibuprofen or acetaminophen may not be the best move, according to a new American Academy of Pediatrics clinical report, published in the journal Pediatrics. The reason: Your child’s fever is a physiologic mechanism that has beneficial effects in fighting infection, so reducing the fever may actually hamper healing.

The details: Even when a child has a mild fever, many parents want to administer antipyretics such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen, according to the report. That’s natural; we all want to be reassured by that “normal” 98.6 reading on the thermometer. But according to the AAP researchers, there is no evidence that fever itself worsens the course of an illness, or causes any long-term neurologic complications. “Thus, the primary goal…should be to improve the child’s overall comfort rather than focus on the normalization of body temperature,” the report says. Continue reading

Young Child Walks for First Time after Innovative Operation

An innovative operation using “telescoping rods” performed at Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan enabled a young Long Island boy to walk for the first time, and the child and his mother are going to Washington, D.C., to tell their story.

Patricia Vega and her son, Ismael, who turns six this month, have been invited to join Dr. Daniel Green, their orthopedic surgeon, to meet with U.S. Senators and Representatives to personally advocate for the future of musculoskeletal care  Continue reading

Childhood Physical Abuse Linked To Arthritis, Study Finds

TORONTO  — Adults who had experienced physical abuse as children have 56 per cent higher odds of osteoarthritis compared to those who have not been abused, according to a new study by University of Toronto researchers.

University of Toronto researchers investigated the relationship between self-reported childhood physical abuse and a diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA). After analyzing representative data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, the researchers determined a significant association between childhood physical abuse and osteoarthritis in adulthood.

The study is published in the November issue of the journal Arthritis Care & Research.

Osteoarthritis is an often debilitating chronic condition that affects millions of adults. “We found that 10.2 per cent of those with osteoarthritis reported they had been physically abused as children in comparison to 6.5 per cent of those without osteoarthritis,” says lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson of U of T’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and Department of Family and Community Medicine. “This study provides further support for the need to investigate the possible role that childhood abuse plays in the development of chronic illness.”

Co-author Sarah Brennenstuhl, a doctoral student at the University of Toronto, stated that, “We were surprised that the significant association between childhood physical abuse and osteoarthritis persisted even after controlling for major potentially confounding factors such as obesity, physical activity levels as well as age, gender, income and race.”

According to Fuller-Thomson, one important avenue for future research is to investigate the pathways through which arthritis may develop as a consequence of childhood physical abuse.