How to Treat Diabetes Naturally – An MD’s Perspective

The basic principle for treating diabetes is to maintain the best possible glycemic control and to prevent organ damage caused by sugar. Excess sugar is always harmful, even to those who do not have diabetes. Sugar accelerates the aging process by forming compounds together Continue reading

The Anti-Aging Effects of Cucumbers

Superfoods are natural foods that have an array of nutrients that synergistically work to together to exponentially expand the individual nutritional components. Many raw, organic vegetables fall into this category. One of the world’s favorite superfoods are cucumbers.

Cucumbers are the 4th most cultivated vegetable in the world. Continue reading

The Top 8 Pain-Fighting Agents for Removing Sore Painful Muscles and Joints

Homeopathies are among one of the most popular remedies for people trying to stay away from the greedy, uncaring drug companies of America and around the world. Wish to use natural safe ingredients in your body? Read this list of some of the most effective pain-reducing homeopathies in the world.

Belladonna:

Before the Middle Ages, Belladonna was taken as an anesthetic for surgery. That’s how powerful it is! Today it’s used in many cough syrups to take away the pain in your throat… as well as alleviating the symptoms of intestinal inflammation, menstrual cycles, and is even being used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Continue reading

Human Model of Rare Genetic Disease Reveals New Clues To Aging Process

Scientists from A*STAR’s Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) in Singapore and the University of Hong Kong’s Department of Medicine have produced the world’s first human cell model of progeria, a disease resulting in severe premature aging in one in four to eight million children worldwide. This model has allowed them to make new discoveries concerning the mechanism by which progeria works. Their findings were published this month in the prestigious scientific journal, Cell Stem Cell.

Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome, also known as progeria, is caused by a mutation in the gene encoding for the protein lamin A, an important component of the membrane surrounding a cell’s nucleus. The mutation results in a truncated form of lamin A called progerin, which in turn causes misshapen cell nuclei and DNA damage. Children with progeria suffer symptoms of premature ageing, including growth retardation, baldness, and atherosclerosis (hardened arteries), and all die in their early teens from either heart attack or stroke.

Led by IMB’s Profs Alan Colman and Colin Stewart, the team used a novel technique of deriving induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from cells of human progeria patients. This human progeria model allows the group to trace and analyse the distinctive characteristics of progeria as it progresses in human cells. Previously, only mouse models of the disease were available.

Said Prof Colman, “While mouse models of progeria have been informative, no one mouse model recapitulates all the symptoms seen in humans. Our human progeria model allows us to examine the pathology of the disease at a much closer resolution than previously possible.”

The researchers used their iPS cells to identify two types of cells – mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) – that were particularly adversely affected by progeria. This means that a young patient with progeria would typically have fewer MSCs and VSMCs than other children. MSCs were found to be very sensitive to a low oxygen environment and their losses could delay renewal of the various tissues they gave rise to, thus exacerbating the patient’s symptoms of ageing. The same effect on VSMCs could explain why their number was reduced in the patient’s heart vessels.

The group’s findings are a significant boost to existing research on over 10 diseases associated with lamin gene mutations. Prof Stewart previously led a study in mice at IMB showing that progeria affected the connective tissues, potentially via defects in a signaling pathway connecting the nuclear lamina with the extracellular matrix and which was associated with death of the smooth muscle in major blood vessels.

Said Prof Stewart, “This new study provides further evidence for the role of lamin processing in connective tissue function, as well as insights into the normal ageing process. We hope to soon find new routes of intervention to treat this incurable disease. Such interventions may be of use in treating atherosclerosis in general, a condition afflicting many millions of individuals.”